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Brown's Elements of Medicine

Dean Tuckers Reflections on the present Matters and Disputes 371

A Discourse delivered to the Students of the Royal Academy

Priestley's Letters to Dr. Horsley, Part II.

377

Dr. Orræus's Description of the Plague at Jalle and Moscow,

(concluded)

384

Pictures from nature

Words of the Songs, &c. in the Nunnery

Parker's Treatise on Hair-dressing

ibid

The Demoniad

ibid

Sufan and Osmond, a Lyric Poem

ibid

Birth-day Conversation anticipated

The Prospect, or Re-union of Britain and America

ibid

Sonnets and other Poems

390

Liberty-hall; a Comic Opera

ibid

Brief account of a Seminary of Learning

391

Adelaide, a Novel

ibid

Vale of Glendour

ibid

Fatal Marriage, a Novel

ibid

Practical Benevolence

ibid

Key to the Parliamentary Debates

ibid

Plain facts

392

Loose thoughts on the very important Situation of Ireland ibid

We have been all in the Wrong

ibid

Dean Berkley's Sermon

393

Dr. Lillies Sermon on the Death of Mrs. Sturgis

ibid

Scripture Lexicon

394

Defence of oppofition

ibid

Lord Mountmorres's Impartial Reflections

ibid

A Gleam of Comfort

395

Thoughts on the Merits of the Westminster Scrutiny

ibid

Manufacturers improper
subjects of Taxation

ibid

Heroic Epistle to Major Scot

ibid

Robertson's Inquiry into the Fine Arts, v. I

401

Smith's Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of

Nations

411

Anna, or Memoirs of a Welsh Heiress

420

Balfour on the Influence of the Moon in Fevers

424

Fox's Speech

Letters to a Young Nobleman

427

Medical Communications, Vol. I. (concluded)

429

Hamilton's Attempt to prove the Existence of the supreme un-

originated Being

437

Boswell's Letter to the People of Scotland

441

Sullivan's Philosophical Rhapsodies

444

The Progress of Romance

Grant's Observations on the use of Opium

451

Fordyce's Fragmenta Chirurgica et Medica.

454

Dr. Francklin's Sermons

457

Craufurd's Essay on the Practical Resources of Great Britain 460

Confiderations sur l'Ouverture de l'Escaut, par M. Linguet 462

Fox's Reply to Pitt

664

The

England separated from America. Excellence of her Con-
stitution

75
Frequent Changes of Ministry. Patronage of the East ibid

The Power of the Commons. Controuled by the People ibid
Designs of North and Fox. Opposed by five Orders in the State 77
Confequences to the Crown and Peers if the Coalition had fuc-
ceeded with the India Bill

ibid
The Principles of the Parliament 1641, attempted to be revived 70
The Crown aflisted with the People prevails

ibid
The good Sense of the People in the Contest with the Coalition ibid
Exclusive Rights of the Commons. Contracted with the Rights
of Peers

150

Peculiar Fabric of English Constitution

ibid

Fox and Pitt's Bills Stated. Commutation Tax

15?

Dutch Fisheries

ibid

Scotland, her Reform. Taxes of laf Session

154

Ireland, hostile appearances subsided

156

Policy and Firmness of D. of Rutland

ibid

America, Observation on her Laws

ibid

Views of France, Pruffia, Russia, England

Air Balloons

159

How Far our Predictions have been realized

160

Irish Propositions

233

Reasoning upon them. Retrospect to America

234

Every Conceffion to Ireland produces new Demands

ibid

Difficult Talk of the Minister

235

Mr. Orde's Declaration to Irish Parliament

ibid

Mr. Pitt's Declaration to the English

236

Prospects of Ireland when Gratified

ibid

Cheapness

THE

ENGLISH

REVIEW.

For ) ANUARY, 1785.

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The History of Greece. By William Mitford, Esq. The first vo*

Jume. 4to. 16s. boards. Murray. N the present historical age, it is with extreme pleasure

that we announce so great an undertaking as 6. The Hils tory of Greece.' For hitherto a work of this sort lias remained among the desiderata of literature. And, it is obvi, ous that it could not have been attempted at a period when historical compositions were more completely understood, and when the public were more disposed to attend to them.

The difficulty of this task was sufficiently apparent to Mr. Mitford. His subject, while it is extensive, is complicated; and his materials, while they are various, are defective. He had occasion for all his diligence and ability; and he has exerted them.

As he intended that his performance should be as complete as possible, he has entered very deeply into the earlier stages of the Grecian story; and, in the volume now before cus, he discovers that he is not only an historian, but a philosopher, and an antiquary... While he collects facts he is ftudious to give them their proper importance. When he meets with knotty and problematical points, he consults not his ease by avoiding them : he is anxious to show his strength in their solution. And, when he is opposed by seeming or real contradictions, and by hoftile theories, he employs himself to search out the trøth by ingenuity, speculation, and research.

The first chapter of his History is devoted to the affairs of Greece, from the earliest accounts to the Trojan war. In his second chapter he exhibits the early state of Alia Minor, ENG. Rev. Vol. V. Jan. 1785. A

and

and is very ingenious in detailing the circumstances of the Trojan expedition. His third chapter examines the religion, government, jurisprudence, science, arts, commerce, and manners of the early Greeks. On this wide field the march of our author is in general steady and secure. The liberality of his mind is every where as conspicuous as the extent of his information; and instruction and amusement are fcattered with a profuse hand. Upon the early manners of the Greeks, he is particularly entertaining, and our readers may be pleased with what he has observed on the subject of the condition of their women.

• Women in the Homeric age,' he observes, enjoyed more freedom, and communicated more in business and amusement among men, than in subsequent ages has been usual in thosc castern countries; far more than at Athens in the flourishing times of the commonwealth. In the Iliad we find Helen and Andromache appearing frequently in company with the Trojan chiefs, and entering freely into the conversation. Attended only by one or two maid-servants, they walk through the"streets of Troy as business or fancy lead them, Penelope, persecuted as she is by her suitors, does not scruple occasionally to lbow herself among them; and scarcely more reserve seems to have been imposed on virgins than on married women. Equally indeed Homer's elegant eulogies and Hefiod's severe sarcasm prove women to have been in their days important members of society. The character of Penelope in the Odyffee is the completest panegyric upon the fex that ever was, composed; and no language can give a more elegant or a more highly colored picture of conjugal affection than is displayed in the conversation between Hector and Andromache in the fixth book of the Iliad. Even Helen, in spite of her failings, and independently of her beauty, Steals upon our hearts in Homer's description by the modesty of her deportment and the elegance of her manners. On all occasions indeed Homer dhows a disposition to favour the fex: civility and attention to them he attributes moft particularly to his greatest characters, to Achilles, and still more remarkably to Hector. The infinite variety of his subjects, and the historical nature of his

poems, Ied him neceffarily to speak of bad women : but even when the black deed of Clytemnestra calls for his utmost reprobation, fill his delicacy toward the sex leads him to mention it in a manner that might tend to guard against that reproach which would be liable to involve all for the wickedness of one. With some things of course widely differing from what prevails in diftant climates and distant ages, we yet find in general the most perfect decency and even elegance of manners in Homer's descriptions of the intercourse of men and women. Of this Helen's conversation on the walls of Troy in the Iliad, and in her court at Sparta in the Odyffee, afford remarkable examples. One office of civility indeed, which we find usually performed by women in the heroic age, may excite our wonder: the bufiness of attending mon in bathing seems to have been peculiar to women ; and, in compliment to men of rank, was performed by virgins of the highest rank. When Teleinachus visited

Nestor

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