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OF

THE NATIVES

OF TIE

TO NGA ISL A N DS,

IN THE SOUTH PACIFIC OCEAN.

WITH

AN ORIGINAL GRAMMAR AND VOCABULARY

OF

THEIR LANGUAGE.

COMPILED AND ARRANGED FROM THE EXTENSIVE COMMUNICATIONS OF

MR. WILLIAM MARINER,

SEVERAL YEARS RESIDENT IN THOSE ISLANDS.

BY JOHN MARTIN, M. D.

« The savages of America inspire less interest .... since celebrated navigators have
made known to us the inhabitants of the islands of the South Sea .... The state of
« half-civilization in which those islanders are found gives a peculiar charm to the
"description of their manners .... Such pictures, no doubt, have more attraction than
« those which pourtray the solemn gravity of the inhabitant of the banks of tl.e
* Missouri or the Maranon."

Preface to Humboldi's Personal Narrative,

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LONDON:

PRINTED FOR THE AUTHOR,
AND SOLD BY JOHN MURRAY, ALBEMARLE-STREET.

1817.

T. Davison, Lombard-street,

Whitefriars, London,

CHAP. XV.

The king annihilates the divine chiefdom of Tooitonga, and

the ceremony of inachi ---Mr. Mariner's adopted mother departs for Hapai— The stratagem used to prevent her female attendants from accompanying her-Spirited speech of Talo on this occasion--All communication with the Hapai islands shut up—The king's extraordinary attention to the cultivation and defence of the country Interesting anecdote' respecting two chiefs, Hála A'pi A'pi and Tálo_Attempt from the people of Hapai-Mr. Mariner discovers an European vessel whilst on a fishing excursion: his men refusing to take him on board, he wounds one mortally, and threatens the others,

upon which they paddle towards the ship—Anecdote of - the wounded man-Mr. Mariner's arrival on board, and

reception from the captain—The king visits him in the ship: his behaviour on board: his earnest wish to go to England–Mr. Mariner sends on shore for the journal of the Port au Prince, and procures the escape of two of his countrymen-Further transactions on board-He takes a final leave of the king--The ship sails for the Hapai islands.

IN consequence of Tooitonga's death, the great obstacle to shutting up the communication with Hapai was, for a time at least, re

VOL. II.

moved; but that it might be so more completely, the king came to a determination of having no more Tooitongas, and thus to put a stop for ever to the ceremony of inachi ; for he conceived that there was very little public utility in what was supposed to be the divine authority of Tooitonga'; but that it was, on the contrary, a great and useless expense to the people. This measure, as may be imagined, did not prove very objectionable to the wishes of the multitude, as it relieved them from the inachi, a very heavy tax; and, in times of scarcity, of course extremely oppressive. In regard to the religious objections which one might suppose would be started against the endeavour to set aside an institution so ancient, so venerable, and so sacred, as that of Tooitonga's divine authority,-it must be noticed that the island of Tonga had, for many years, been deprived of the power, presence, and inAuence of Tooitonga, owing to its political situation; and, notwithstanding, appeared in the eyes of Finow, and of all his chiefs, warriors, and subjects, to be not less favoured with the bounties of heaven and of nature than the other islands, excepting the mischief and destruction which arose from human passion and disturbances : and if Tonga could

exist without this divine chief, why not Vavago, or any other island? This strong argument growing still stronger, upon a little reflection, brought the chiefs, matabooles, and older members of society, to the resolution, that Tooitonga was of no use at all ; and the people themselves, ever willing to fall into measures that greatly promote their interest, notwithstanding a few religious scruples, very soon came to be of the same opinion too. · As soon as Finow had come to this determination, and to that of shutting up all communication with the Hapai people, it became necessary to acquaint Tongamana, at his next arrival, with this new regulation, and to forbid. him ever to return to Vavaoo again. In the mean time, however, as Finow had promised Tooi Bolotoo that his daughter (Mr. Mariner's adopted mother) should be allowed to proceed to him at the Hapais, she was ordered to get herself and attendants ready to accompany Tongamana on his way back. Now it happened this person had a great number of female attendants, many of whom were some of the handsomeşt women at Vavaoo; and, as the leave granted to her to depart was equally a licence for the departure of her attendants, Finow became apprehensive that the alienation of

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