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FLORILEGIUM POETICUM.

A SELECTION OF ELEGIAC EXTRACTS FROM

OVID AND TIBULLUS.

NEW EDITION,

GREATLY ENLARGED, WITH ENGLISH NOTES,

BY THE

REV. PERCIVAL FROST, M.A.,

FORMERLY FELLOW OF ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE.

JAN '78

SODLEIANA

LONDON:

GEORGE BELL, YORK STREET, COVENT GARDEN;

WHITTAKER AND CO., AVE MARIA LANE.

1877.

297.9

LONDON':

PRINTED BY WILLIAM CLOWES AND SONS,

STAMFORD STREET AND CHARING CROSS.

PREFACE.

In

THIS book is a revised edition of a favourite volume, now out of print, Florilegium Poeticum, originally edited by the Rev. George Whittaker. The work, in its first edition, consisted of extracts from Ovid, Tibullus, Propertius, Martial, and Ausonius. the present edition the extracts from the last three have been withdrawn, and replaced by additional ones from Ovid and Tibullus. The work, therefore, now consists entirely of passages from these two writers; and contains all the pieces to be found in the selections ordinarily used in schools, with large additional extracts, so that the total number of passages exceeds that of any similar work. The extracts from Tibullus are distinguished by his name, all the rest being from Ovid.

There are also appended English foot notes, which the original edition was without. It is hoped, therefore, that the volume will be thus made more useful as a class-book for translation.

And over and above this, as the selections have been carefully made or revised, and are graduated in length, the volume-consisting entirely, as it does, of choice passages of Latin elegiac verse-may, it is thought, be useful for "repetition." It is traditionally supposed that he who wishes to write English prose with elegance must give his days. and nights to Addison. So, if any one wishes to excel in Latin elegiac verse composition, he must first commit to memory large portions of Ovid, as the great master in this branch of poetry.

PERCIVAL FROST.

Rumburgh Vicarage,
Suffolk, 1877.

SHORT ACCOUNT OF OVID AND

TIBULLUS.

PUBLIUS OVIDIUS NASO was born at Sulmo, a town of the Peligni, A.U.C. 711. His family was of equestrian rank, and possessed a liberal fortune. His father, who wished to educate him for the bar, sent him at an early age to Rome, to learn the liberal arts and sciences: he began to plead in the Forum, agreeably to the wishes of his father, and acquired both reputation and public employment; but he was born a poet, and the laborious profession of the law did not suit his taste; accordingly, as soon as his father died, he gave himself up entirely to the Muses. His amatory works were his first productions; he then wrote his books of Metamorphoses, which he left imperfect, and his tragedy of Medea, which is lost. These works raised his reputation to a great height at Rome. Falling under the suspicion of Augustus, either because he expressed a passion for his daughter Julia in some of his poems, or because he was a witness of some dark crime of the prince, or for some other cause (for nothing certain is known on this head), he was banished,

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