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the campaign the 13th of Decem was enjoyed.

Christmas Eve ber was the most fatiguing, and was spent at Ali Musjid, and again the hardest work fell to at the hour when, throughout their lot, though the K.O.S.B. every village in England, the and the 3rd Gurkhas bore the unwelcome carol-singer chants brunt of the fighting. In the of “Peace on earth, goodwill early morning they were told toward men,” Christmas morn off to burn the defences of the was heralded in by the sound of villages on both sides of the firing. river as far as Guli Khel. The Three days of flanking duties, destruction was rapidly accom- skirmishing, and desultory fightplished, as a Gurkha is an adept ing followed Christmas Day, and at doing the greatest possible on the 28th the Scouts formed damage in the least possible part of Sir William Lockhart's time. From Guli Khel they personal escort back to Jamrud. kept parallel with the rear On that day the first phase of guard along the tops of the the Tirah Campaign ended. hills on the left bank of the The 5th Gurkha Scouts had river. What this would entail started 92 strong, and the men is not easy to understand—even of the 1-3rd numbered 40. Of for practised climbers. The these only 3 had been killed and heights were all isolated; each 5 wounded, whereas a loss of hill towered from 1000 to 2000 more than 100 in killed alone feet above the slowly progress- had been inflicted by them on ing column winding along the the enemy. The value of the river-bed; the sides were steep trained mountaineers had been and in some places precipitous; frequently demonstrated during a perpetual climb up and down, the war. Their admirable guidand up again, went on until ing had enabled the others to after dark; and, for a welcome reach their objective with a change, parties of the enemy minimum of exposure, and this must needs be surprised and accounts to a great extent for driven off. Even as the day's their immunity from loss. Still, work seemed ended, a body of so great a disproportion is hard Pathans tried to rush the rear to understand when we reflect section, but, meeting with on the losses sustained by other reception warmer than had been corps. With the exception of anticipated, they decamped. To the fight on the Saran Sar, all crown all, the baggage again or part of the Scouts had taken went astray, the night was part in every action between pitch dark, and an attack was October 18 and December 28. expected. Worn out and fam- They were engaged thirty-one ishing, the tough little fellows times by day and seventeen by flung themselves on the ground night. And they had their to snatch what sleep they reward. Eight men received could.

the Order of Merit for gallantry Jamrud was reached on the in action, and six obtained 17th, and there a whole week's special promotion. Of the three welcome and well-earned rest officers, Captain Lucas, com

а

men

manding, received the brevet of 21st, and 22nd. Football was major as well as the D.S.O.; likewise indulged in. “We used Lieutenant the Hon. C. G. to play a lot of football with Bruce, on his subsequent pro- the Tommies,” wrote the commotion to captain, also received mandant, “and held our own his brevet-majority, and Lieu- fairly well. The British ontenant Tillard the D.S.O. That lookers would cheer our the services of the Scouts were with shouts of ‘Go it, Johnny ! appreciated was also shown by Well played, Johnny !' and there their reorganisation into a bat was invariably a roar of aptalion of ğ British officers and plause when we got a goal.” 666 Gurkha officers and men, As usual, British and Gurkhas drawn from the 5th, 1-1st, and became very good comrades. 2-3rd Gurkhas, all under the Several real friendships sprang command of Captain Lucas. up, and some of these chums They were re-armed with the keep up a correspondence to this Lee-Metford, and all ranks day. . eagerly looked forward to a While the Scout Battalion resumption of the campaign. was at Ali Musjid in March, an But this was not to be : the Afridi approached Major Lucas Afridis complied with the terms, and begged permission to join and on April 9 the Scouts his battalion. Informed that marched to Peshawur, thence it was composed entirely of dispersing to their respective Gurkhas, “Oh, never mind,” cantonments. Major Lucas said he, “I like Gurkhas. We describes the joy that reigned had great fun with some who in the new battalion : “The used to prowl round the Maidan men were delighted with the camp at nights.” “ When I Lee-Metfords, and used to put told him that the prowlers were on any amount of side at being my men,” wrote Major Lucas to the only native troops armed Lord Roberts, “his delight knew like the British. The roads at no bounds. He smacked me on Peshawur

hardly big the back, shook hands, and enough to hold them when introduced me to his friends." they condescended to walk! Yet these were the Gurkhas Their favourite mode of loco- who had burned their villages motion was to drive through and slain their young men. the place in dogcarts — about Can Mr Labouchere explain? ten men in each !”

Summing up the work of the At Lundi Kotal the Scouts Scouts in the Tirah Campaign, challenged all comers to a hill we might imagine them declar

Numbers of Afridis and ing—not in tones of complaint other Pathans competed, but but rather with complacent selfwere hopelessly out-classed, the congratulationGurkhas taking every place in the first thirty except the 9th,

“Lor', they shoved us in the stalls!”

were

the campaign the 13th of Decem was enjoyed. Christmas Eve ber was the most fatiguing, and was spent at Ali Musjid, and again the hardest work fell to at the hour when, throughout their lot, though the K.O.S.B. every village in England, the and the 3rd Gurkhas bore the unwelcome carol-singer chants brunt of the fighting. In the of “Peace on earth, goodwill early morning they were told toward men,” Christmas morn off to burn the defences of the was heralded in by the sound of villages on both sides of the firing. river as far as Guli Khel. The Three days of flanking duties, destruction was rapidly accom- skirmishing, and desultory fightplished, as a Gurkha is an adepting followed Christmas Day, and at doing the greatest possible on the 28th the Scouts formed damage in the least possible part of Sir William Lockhart's time. From Guli Khel they personal escort back to Jamrud. kept parallel with the rear On that day the first phase of guard along the tops of the the Tirah Campaign ended. hills on the left bank of the The 5th Gurkha Scouts had river. What this would entail started 92 strong, and the men is not easy to understand-even of the 1-3rd numbered 40. Of for practised climbers. The these only 3 had been killed and heights were all isolated; each 5 wounded, whereas a loss of hill towered from 1000 to 2000 more than 100 in killed alone feet above the slowly progress- had been inflicted by them on ing column winding along the the enemy.

The value of the river-bed; the sides were steep trained mountaineers had been and in some places precipitous; frequently demonstrated during a perpetual climb up and down, the war. Their admirable guidand up again, went on until ing had enabled the others to after dark; and, for a welcome reach their objective with a change, parties of the enemy minimum of exposure, and this must needs be surprised and accounts to a great extent for driven off. Even as the day's their immunity from loss. Still, work seemed ended, a body of so great a disproportion is hard Pathans tried to rush the rear to understand when we reflect section, but, meeting with a on the losses sustained by other reception warmer than had been corps. With the exception of anticipated, they decamped. To the fight on the Saran Sar, all crown all, the baggage again or part of the Scouts had taken went astray,

the night was part in every action between pitch dark, and an attack was October 18 and December 28. expected. Worn out and fam- They were engaged thirty-one ishing, the tough little fellows times by day and seventeen by flung themselves on the ground night. And they had their to snatch what sleep they reward. Eight men received could

the Order of Merit for gallantry Jamrud was reached on the in action, and six obtained 17th, and there a whole week's special promotion. Of the three welcome and well-earned rest officers, Captain Lucas, com

men

manding, received the brevet of 21st, and 22nd.

Football was major as well as the D.S.O.; likewise indulged in. “We used Lieutenant the Hon. C. G. to play a lot of football with Bruce, on his subsequent pro- the Tommies,” wrote the commotion to captain, also received mandant, “and held our own his brevet-majority, and Lieu- fairly well. The British ontenant Tillard the D.S.O. That lookers would cheer our the services of the Scouts were with shouts of “Go it, Johnny ! appreciated was also shown by Well played, Johnny !’and there their reorganisation into a bat was invariably a roar of aptalion of 9 British officers and plause when we got a goal.” 666 Gurkha officers and men, As usual, British and Gurkhas drawn from the 5th, 1-1st, and became very good comrades. 2-3rd Gurkhas, all under the Several real friendships sprang command of Captain Lucas. up, and some of these chums They were re-armed with the keep up a correspondence to this Lee-Metford, and all ranks day. eagerly looked forward to a While the Scout Battalion resumption of the campaign. was at Ali Musjid in March, an But this was not to be : the Afridi approached Major Lucas Afridis complied with the terms, and begged permission to join and on April 9 the Scouts his battalion. Informed that marched to Peshawur, thence it was composed entirely of dispersing to their respective Gurkhas, “Oh, never mind,” cantonments. Major Lucas said he, “I like Gurkhas. We describes the joy that reigned had great fun with some who in the new battalion : “The used to prowl round the Maidan men were delighted with the camp at nights.” “ When I Lee-Metfords, and used to put told him that the prowlers were on any amount of side at being my men,” wrote Major Lucas to the only native troops armed Lord Roberts, “his delight know like the British. The roads at no bounds.

He smacked me on Peshawur were hardly big the back, shook hands, and enough to hold them when introduced me to his friends." they condescended to walk! Yet these were the Gurkhas Their favourite mode of loco- who had burned their villages motion was to drive through and slain their young men. the place in dogcarts — about Can Mr Labouchere explain? ten men in each !”

Summing up the work of the At Lundi Kotal the Scouts Scouts in the Tirah Campaign, challenged all comers to a hill we might imagine them declarrace. Numbers of Afridis and ing—not in tones of complaint other Pathans competed, but but rather with complacent selfwere hopelessly out-classed, the congratulationGurkhas taking every place in the first thirty except the 9th,

“Lor', they shoved us in the stalls!”

LIKE TO LIKE:

A TRIVIAL ROMANCE.

BY G. S. STREET.

CHAPTER VI.

soon

re

was

FAIRBROTHER was

worth looked hard at his sister, vived, and with his bruised who still looked at the floor. head anointed and comforted Hugh Sinclair was the first to with a cold rag, lay on a sofa speak. in the drawing - room. The “ Tell you what my theory others stood by and looked on is,” he said. « Old brother him with a gloomy interest- Fairbrother had been going all but Lady Betty, who sat rather strong with the drinks, very pale and looked at the and began fooling about with floor. Fairbrother still his sword, and very naturally dazed, and answered their fell down. Then" - turning questions with an effort of to the victim on the sofa memory.

then, when you were coming “Yes; I slipped, I suppose. to, you sort of dreamt about Fellow came in window

Sir Eustace and all that. 66 What?cried Mereworth. That's it.”

" Fellow came in window and Lady Betty looked up for the challenged me fight, and we first time. That must be it," were fighting when it happened, she said quickly. I suppose.

The gloomy in Mereworth bit his lip, and terest was changed to excite- looked at her again. “I exment, and “My dear fellow !” pect Hugh's right,” he said ; “Man came in at the window !” "you must have imagined it, “What on earth do you mean?” old man.” came in chorus. Only Lady Fairbrother looked perplexed Betty sat silent. “That's all for a moment, and then spoke I know,” continued Fairbrother excitedly. “I tell you I didn't; slowly, “except that we quar- I'm certain it was all real. He relled 'bout something. Wait- made me fight with swords" oh yes, by Jove !”—and he half —his audience looked more and sat up and looked less vacuous. incredulous—“

"and then “Most extraordinary thing. He oh yes, I heard Betty call out was just like your ancestor— my name in the hall. yes, he said he was Sir Eustace; “Well, but, Lady Betty,” Sinand he was dressed like we are, clair, anxious for his theory, inyou know—like the picture." terposed, “did you hear any

There was a silence of amaze noise of swords clashing and ment. Bertha Mostyn's round that, while you were in the blue eyes widened, and Mere- `hall?"

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