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WFA FOOD SALES AMOUNT TO 15 MILLION DOLLARS IN MAY AND JUNE

During the last two months--May 1 to July l--the War Food Administration has sold into civilian trade channels more than 15 million dollars worth of food from Government-owned stocks, Sales have included canned fruits and vegetables, dried fruit, dairy products, eggs, beans, peas, rice, fish products, and Irish potatoes for starch.

This food, no longer needed to meet the requirements of the United States military forces, commitments to our allies, or for other war agency use, has been released from stocks hich may be divided roughly into three categories:

1. After inventories are carefully checked against requirements of the various Government

war agencies, it may be found that there are relatively small lots of food which will
not be needed. Changes in wer plans, location of the stocks, or type of package are
among the reasons for releasing them to the civilian trade. Every offort is being
made to trin stocks to known requirements to avoid excessive surpluses and resultant

was to and disruption of markets after the war.
2. To prevent deterioration of stocks which must be maintained in quantities sufficient

to meet wer needs, FA is following established trade practice of turning stocks to

keep its invontory in good condition at all times.
3. Some stocks have been built up as a result of price-support programs, Prices have been

supported on & mumber of commodities to encourage production and assure adequate supplies.
These purchases are usually made during the periods of peak production and as production
declines and the market can absorb then, the commodities are being sold to the civilian
trade,

WFA's Office of Distribution through its Sales Division is making use of established trade channels in releasing these food stocks for civilian consumption. Where it is practical, the original packer is given the first chance to buy back the se food stocks. If, however, he does not take food offered to him, the stocks will then be sold through other trade channels.

A sales plan is worked out by the Sales Division for each definite quantity of food which is released at a given time. In making up this sales plan, consideration is given to deficit areas, location of the product and the need for it in that area.

Fresh Fish Trade

THREE PORTS LANDINGS SHOW GAINS OVER 1943 FOR FIRST 6 MONTHS DESPITE DROP IN JUNE

Fishing vessels delivering their catches to the ports of Boston and Gloucester, Mass., and Portland, Maine, in June landed 40,966,000 pounds of fishery products, valued at $2,058,942, according to Current Fishery Statistics No. 137, published by the Fish and Wildlife Service. This was a decrease of four percent in amount landed and nine percent in value received by the fishermen compared with May 1944. Compared with June 1943, it was a decrease of eight percent in volume and 22 percent in value. Five items, rosefish, mackerel, haddock, cod, and whiting, accounted for 94 percent of the June landings.

Considering the landings by ports, 14,607,000 pounds, valued at $919,730, were landed at Boston; 25,081,000 pounds, valued at $1,087,728, at Gloucester; and 1,278,000 pounds, valued at $51,484, at Portland.

During the month, 238 vessels made 1,045 trips to the fishing grounds. with 231 vessels which made 1,268 trips during June 1943.

This compares

The over-all weighted average price per pound received by the fishermen for their catches during June was 5.03 cents compared with 5.30 cents during May, and 5.98 cents during June 1943.

Total landings at the three ports for the first six months of 1944, amounted to 164,816,000 pounds, valued at $9,881,205. This was an increase of 11 percent in volume, but a decrease of 19 percent in value compared with the corresponding period in 1943.

6.55

9.81

Landings by Fishing Vessels at Boston and Gloucester, Mass., and Portland, Maine

Six mos. ending with June-I tem June 1944 May 1944 June 1943 1944

1943 Pounds Cents* Pounds Cents* Pounds Cents* Pounds Cents Pounds Cents Cod

4,709,417

6.15 10,421,342 6,20 3,854,224 8.59 35,263,5696.92 25,017,588 10.02 Haddock

7,693,585 6.85 9,566,896 6.92 10,112,034 8.38 50,128,125 7.71 55,484,534 10.25 Hake 511,587 5.51 1,259,150 2.64 295,639 5.59 3,678,746 4.15 1,461,521

8.38 Pollock

540,299 4.46 1,988,273 4.42 1,211,021 5.65 8,010,931 5.34 6,790, 296 8.75 Cusk 119,086 5.48 116,508 5.47

105,921

540,099 6.38 675,792 9.22 Halibut

19,209 18.08

47,937 18.63 26,512 18.38 122,228 17.95 130,128 24.86 Mackerel 7,869,197 5.32 5,952,425 4.88 6,297,602 6.00 13,822,132 5.13 7,725,977 6.12 Flounders: Gray sole 185,248 7.03 269,386 7.00

184,997 9.41 1,128,320 7.86 1,337,141 Lemon sole 147,107 8,11 221,885

278,200 10.40

439, 928

8.63 761,847 11.38 Yellowtail 86,211 4.41 234, 230

322,405 6.19 1,094,659 6.25 1,771,704 7.48 Blackback 101,897 6.99 93,742

6.86 179,995 7.46 694, 959 8.68 740,150 8.75 Dab 552,323 4.54 428,733 4.47

569,680

5.51 1,713,452 5.05 1,715,930 Other

775
315

1,090

565 Rosefish 15,053,469 3.75 11,348,073 3.70 15,489,592 3.72 42,967,918 3.86 37,809,719 4.35 Whiting 3,292,044 3.98 500,473 4.02 5,131,307 4.15 3,847,674

3.96

5,980,910 4.40 Wolffish 75,189 4.48 256,269

4.83
90,430 8.78 801,907

5.21 505,878 7.98 Eelpout

8,625 3.05

250
4.00
149,555 3.70

108,105

2.71 Scallops(meats)

13,213 30.00 166,440 52.71 105,652 35.45 370,860 55.30 Other 8,886

15,334
304,927

398,534 To tal 40,965,529 5.03 42,752,093 5.30 44,331,583 5.98 164,815,871 6.00 148,787,179 8.18

By ports: Boston

14,607,079 6.30 16,987,615 6.34 17,473,941 8.25 76,283,824 7.14 79,783,624 10.08 Gloucester 25,081, 217 4.34 23, 868,968 4.65 24,675,426 4.52 81,418,042 5.06 59,512,320 6.13 Portland 1,277,233 4.03 1,895.510

1,895.510 4.15 2,182.216 4.25 7, 114,005 4.37 9,491,235 5.05 "Weighted average of prices per pound paid to fishermen.

7.83 4.38

6.42

24,618

JUNE LANDINGS AT NEW BEDFORD DECLINE 40 PERCENT

Landings of fishery products during June at New Bedford, Mass., totaled 8,178,000 pounds, valued to the fishermen at $622,815, according to data published in Current Fishery Statistics No. 138 by the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, This was a decrease of 40 percent in amount landed and 33 percent in value to the fishermen compared with May. Compared with June 1943, when 7,259,000 pounds, valued at $723,020, were landed, it was an increase of 13 percent in volume, but a decrease of 14 percent in value.

During the month, 172 craft made 373 trips to the fishing grounds. The over-all weighted average price per pound received by fishermen during June was 7.62 cents compared with 6.80 cents during May and 9.96 cents during June 1943. The principal items landed during June were haddock, mackerel, and blackbacks, which accounted for 79 percent of the total.

Total landings for the first six months of 1944, amounted to 44,226,000 pounds, valued at $3,370,127 to the fishermen. Compared with the same period of 1943, this was an increase of 37 percent in volume, but a decrease of one percent in value. The total weighted average value for the first six months of the current year was 7.62 cents per pound compared with 10.55 cents during the same period of 1943.

8.44

6.34

8.65 6.72

Landings by Fishing Craft at New Bedford, Massachusetts

Six mos, ending with June--
Item
June 1944

May 1944
June 1943
1944

19243
Pounds Cents Pounds Conts*, Pounds Cents Pounds

Cents Pounds Cents. Cod 419,0716.01 893.826

7.97 4,167,734 7.95 2,027,173 8.83 Haddock

3,069,466 7.92 4,558,040 6:87 1,041,343 3:52 11:141,832 7.13 3,623,592 Hake: White 27,850 6.35 37.737

42,666 4.60 104,541 6.57 112,278 4.77 Red 460 2.61 807.528 1.76

1,919,808 1.90

125 Eelpout 575 3.13 54,722 2.58

3.224.239 6.42 3,179,129 3.15 Pollock 8,665 4.50 28,702 4.59

865 3.35
130,673 5.20

66,066 Halibut

5,367 17.22 13,995 17.58 748 20.05 35,309 17.37 17,774 26:82 Mackerel 1,796,445 5.04 3,197,580 4.88 2,257,805 5.71 4,994,025 4.94 4,279,085 Flounders: Gray sole 13,050 7.02 18,355 6.96 3,428 4.99 33.937 7.10 13,229

9.20 Lemon sole 292,191 1.97 840,507 7.93 72,583 10.61 1,953,123 8.98 503, 601 13.48 Yellowtail 321 263 4.66 320,012 4.50 1,547,571 5.57 9,489,175 2.13 12,514,904 9.24 Blackback 1,632, 885 6.89 2,300,022 6.85 1,444,125 8:31

4:758,513 4:08 3;312;622 7.04 Dab

22,840 4.50 12,695 4.51 1.825 4.49 64,432 4.93 107,234 8.05 Fluke 13,512 6.27

27,529 . 16.02 8,889 10.20 404,003 16.71 11,835 10.02 Swordfish 2,368 29.98

4,215 51,24 2,368 29.98 4,215 51.24 Rosefish

3.330 1.26
Whiting
23,000 3.87

435 4.14
1,704 1.82 37.300 3.95

3,206 2.46 Wolffish 15,005 4.47

17,698
4.43 1,470 2.38 42,135 4.74 11, 232

5.86 Scallops (meats) 445,076 30:36 442, 348 30.00 562,688 49.95 1,552,688 31.84 1,951,407 51.53 Other

6,277
157,014

62,955 Total 8,177,790 7.62 13,589,191 6.80 7,258,679 9.96 44,226,379 7.62 32,201,662 10.55 *Weighted average of prices per pound paid to fishermen.

17,460

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68,701

NEW YORK FISH RECEIPIS DECREASE 18 PERCENT IN JUNE

June receipts of fresh and frozen fishery products on the Salt-water Market decreased 18 percent compared with May, and 9 percent compared with June 1943, according to the Seryice's New York Market News office. In the opinion of some dealers, relaxation of the regulations governing meat rationing contributed to a decreased demand for fish. This was followed by a falling, off in the volume of supplies of most varieties received in New York City.

Halibut receipts from the West Coast showed a considerable increase over May's abnormally low arrivals, but fell far below those of June 1943. Swellfish (blowfish), while comprising but a small percentage of the total receipts, continued to show a sizable increase over previous months. Much favorable publieity is still being given this variety, through the medium of local newspapers. A decrease in shrimp receipts from June 1943 was due, at least in part, to a falling off in production.

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Receipts of fresh and Frozen Fishery Products--Sal t-weter Market, New York City

June
June compared with May

June Item

1944

May 1944 June 1943 1944. 1943 Classification:

Pounds
Percent Percent Pounds

Pounds Fish

15,750,000 - 26 - 13 21,338,000 18,136,000 Shellfish, etc.

6,072,000 + 13 + 3 5,356,000 5,884,000 Total receipts

21,828,000

18

- 9 26,694,000 24,020,000 Important Items: Cod

1,465,000
37

2,336,000 1,537,000 Croaker

330,000

42
23

570,000 431,000 Flounders: Blackbacks

1,877,000

23
28

2,433,000 2,614,000 Yellowtails

698,000
28 - 18

966,000 852,000 Haddock

2,297,000

1
+ 12

2,330,000 2,052,000 Halibut

490,000 +1261 48

36,000 942,000 Mackerel

1,659,000

20

2,691,000 2,077,000 Scup (porgy)

1,193,000

10 1,098,000 1,325,000 Sea trout, gray (weakfish)

484,000
39 +19

789,000 408,000 Shad

187,000

94 - 47 2,943,000 351,000 Swellfish (blowfish)

64,000 + 19 +166

54,000 24,000 Whiting

957,000 +

- 4

896,000 994,000 Fillets (unclassified)

410,000

40
2
679,000

420,000 Clams, hard

3,097,000
13 + 29

2,748,000 2,406,000 Lobsters

769,000 + 14 + 14

672,000 675,000 Shrimp

1,005,000 + 38

26

727,000 1,360,000 Arrivals by: Fishing vessels

1,973,000

16
+ 1

2,353,000 1,947,000 Truck, freight, and express

19,855,000

18
10

24. 341,000 22,073,000 *Excluding imports entered at New York City.

38
9

+

GULF SHRIMP PRODUCTION INCREASED IN JUNE

Shrimp production for the month of June increased sharply over May yields at most points along the Gulf Coast, helping bring up the yearly production which is still 28 percent below the first six months of 1943, the Market News office at New Orleans has reported.

Total production of shrimp for all purposes was 21,420 barrels in June, a 50 percent increase over the 14,167 barrels produced in May. Partly because of price disagreements which tied up Biloxi fishermen early in the year, and also because of a subsequent scarcity of shrimp on the fishing grounds, production for the first six months of the year totaled 73,340 barrels, compared with 101,738 barrels during the same period last year.

In contrast to shrimp, hard crabs showed a strong increase in total production for the year as well as in the June fishery. Gulf Coast fishermen had caught 5,099,000 pounds of hard crabs by the end of June, compared with 3,781,000 pounds by that date last year.

Because of the shortage of shrimp during the spring season, many shrimp canners turned to crab meat, canning this product for the first time. As a result, June was a record month for the canning of crab meat in this area, with 108,000 pounds processed in addition to 73,000 pounds sold fresh and frozen.

12 months Jan. -Dec.

1943

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138,874 251 394 390,268

Production of Fishery Products in the Gulf States*
June 1944

6 months Compared with Item

Unit
June
compared with

Jan.-June 6 months
1944 May 1944
June 1943 1944

1943 Shrimp:

Percent Per cent

Per cent
For canning

Bols.
1,025 +236 -74

2,058

-89 Other 20,395 +47 +20

71,282

-14 To tal 21,420 + 51

2

73,340 -28 Oysters: For canning

326,889 Other

8,505
- 29

132,417 Total

8,505

73
6

459,306
Crabs, hard
Lbs. 2,280,410

+ 55
+59 5,098,928

+35
Crabmeat, fresh-cooked
183,510 + 72 -14

436,908 + 2 Sal t-water fish

420,710

11

-33 2,546,271 -18 Fresh-water fish

66,830
6 +20

297.779 -15 "Includes production in Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas.

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507,350 298,641

805,991 8,876,943 1,028, 908 6,683,995

662,525

CHICAGO RECEIPTS. IN JUNE CONTINUE BELOW 1943

Although they were 3 percent over May, the June arrivals of fresh and frozen fishery products in the wholesale market in Chicago, totaling 6,618,000 pounds, dropped 29 percent under the June 1943 figure, according to the Service's Chicago Market News office. Receipts of fresh-water fish fell below those of May, while salt-water fish and shellfish both showed important gains. The decline in supplies of fresh-water fish was caused largely by the slackening of the blue pike run in Lake Erie. Contributing to the gains in the other two classifications were shipments of halibut from the Pacific Coast and of shrimp from the Gulf States, Receipts for the first six months of 1944 were 15 percent below those of 1943, decreases being general among important items.

6mos.

Item

Receipts of Fresh and Frozen Fishery Products at Chicago
June 1944

6 mos. 1944
June
compared with

Jan, -June compared with
1944 May 1944 June 1943 1944. 6 mos. 1943
Pounds Percent Percent Pounds

Percent 3,263,000

19

7 22,104,000 + 3 1,760,000

66

47 8,974,000 - 34
. 46
2,837,000

- 39
5,618,000

3

29 33,915,000 - 15

12 months Jan. -Dec,

1943 Pounds 42,508,000 29, 820,000 11,706,000 84,034,000

1 + +

596,000

67

+

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Classification: Fresh-water fish Salt-water fish Shellfish, etc.

Total receipts

Important Items:
Blue pike
Carp
Lake herring
Lake trout
Sheepshead
Suckers
Whitefish
Yellow pike
Cod
Halibut
Rosefish fillets
Shrimp

Leading Sources:
Louisiana
Massachusetts
Michigan
British Columbia

Domestic to tal
Imported to tal

Transported by:
Truck
Express
Freight

344,000
155,000
238,000
651,000
256,000
193,000
530,000
312,000
342,000
737,000
220,000
514,000

7.

12 +

18 +

5
+ 1108

18
73

+ 30
- 41
- 30
+

48

21 + 31 + 22 +176 .61 . 6 - 42

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26

3 - 3

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+ 34

12

3 + 744

14 73

46 + 6 - 55 - 32

22

1,251,000 3,243,000 3,583,000 1,676,000 21,725,000 12,190,000

- 69 . 16

5,343,000 8,913,000 7,683,000 10,707,000 57,065,000 26,968,000

+

- 12

8,196,000 13,343,000 12,375,000

1,353,000 3,172,000 1,094,000

I + +

25
22
4

14
34
28

9 21 . 11

18,898,000 35,355,000 29,781,000

SEATILE RECEIPTS OF FRESH AND FROZEN FISHERY PRODUCTS CONTINUE TO GAIN DURING JUNE

Seattle receipts of fresh and frozen fishery products during June increased 60 percent over May, according to the Service's local Market News office. Contributing to the rise was increased activity of the halibut fleet. In spite of a late beginning of halibut fishing, which caused a virtual lack of receipts in May and subnormal landings in early June, total receipts were 4,382,000 pounds, only 28 percent less than those for June 1943.

Otter-trawl fishing was sporadic. Heavy landings of lingcod and rockfish were reported but this gain was off set by a decline in sablefish and sole receipts,

For the first six months of 1944, the totals for practically all the major items were less than for the corresponding period in 1943.

6mos.

12 months Jan. -Dec,

1943 Pounds 82,471,000

Receipts of Fresh and Frozen Fishery Products at Seattle
June 1944

Compared with
Item

June

Compared witila Jan.-June 6 months 1944 May 1944 June 1943 1944

1943 Classification:

Pounds

Percent Percent Pounds Percent To tal fish and shellfish 9,492,000 + 60 -26 30,713,000 -22

Important Items: Halibut 4,382,000 +2433

-28

7,343,000 -52 Lingcod

1,21,000
+ 26 -43

3,735,000 -21
Rockfish
638,000 + 25 +91

2,221,000 -12 Sablefish

96,000
69 -39

966,000

-38 Salmon 941,000 + 50 -46

4,243,000

8 Sole

873,000

57 -32 4,298,000 Oysters

154,000

-24 1,528,000 *Halibut and shark fleets and receipts from local and all other sources. **Converted from gallons to pounds using factor of 8.75.

24,384,000 6,942,000 4,506,000 5,046,000 16,895,000 10,093,000 2,522,000

+7

+38

PRICES ESTABLISHED FOR CERTAIN FRESH FISH IN ALASKA

Order No. 3, Region IX, under Section 2 (a) of MPR-418--Fresh Fish and Seafood--modifies producers' maximum prices for fresh fish in Alaska. Excerpts follow:

1. On and after the effective date of this order, the maximum prices for producers of fresh fish sold on fishing grounds or receiving stations in and off the Territory of Alaska, shall be the maximum prices established by Table A at the Alaskan port of entry nearest to the grounds or station where delivery of the fish is made to the buyer or the buyer's agent, less the deduction for the applicable species of fish as set forth below:

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For all other fresh fish or species of fresh fish, regardless of size or style of dressing, the amount to be deducted shall be two cents per pound.

2. This Order No. 3 supersedes Order No. 1 and Order No. 2 which are hereby revoked. 3. This order may be revoked or amended at any time,

This Order No. 3 shall become effective July 15, 1944.
Issued this 14th day of July 1944.

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