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conceires “ that the deist or the atheist, who openly and honestly rejects the Bible, must incur less of the divine displeasure than the man (a Unitarian) who professes to believe the scriptures, and yet labours to undermine its very foundation.” I have not quite so good an opinion of deists and atheists as Mr. B. seems to have. What he considers as open honesty, I consider as brazen blasphemy.

Granting that there may be (and there is no doubt) an honest deist; the fool atheist, who openly denies the existence and perfections of that Being who created him, and whose paternal goodness supplies him with all his blessings, surely does not deserve the name of honest. Even to suspect that there is no presiding intelligence over the affairs of the universe, is a mark of mental imbecility ; but openly to deny it, is a conduct, to express the baseness of which, language has no name. I do not pretend to underrate the conduet of Unitarians, in purging, as they think, Christianity from its corruptions. What they consider the blemishes of Christianity, I consider its basis and beauty. Whatever degree of wickedness there is in their conduct, they certainly do not designedly and knowingly undermine the foundation of the Bible. We must leave them in the hands of God, who will certainly do right when he judgeth.

A Unitarian, of considerable literary acquirements, was, not long since, reclaimed by affectionate argument; and no other means ought ever to be employed. Bigotry, that imp of hell, never performed such an achievement, nor ever will; God will never own its work. The spirit manifested by the Bishop of Landaff, in his answer to Thomas Paine, is most amiable; and to all orthodox writers I would say, Go thou, and do likewise.

I am, Sir, &c. MODERATUS.

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ANECDOTE OF ZENO.

Among the discoveries and improveTRUE pbilosophy consists in the love ments which distinguish the present of wisdom. This opinion was enter-age, there are scarcely any more retained by the founder of the Stoics, markable, than those which have arisen whose doctrines the following anec- from the varied application of Steam. dote placesin a proper light. ---Zeno, on On an extensive scale, its power and being told that Love was unbecoming utility are well known. Scarcely a a philosopher, replied -“If this were year elapses in which its uses are not true, the fate of the fair sex would be extended. It has found its way into lamentable, for they would only then many of our large manufactories, at be loved by fools.”.

once giving motion to the most com

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plicated machinery, and imparting and on which the plate is laid to be warmth to those who are engaged in heated for working. the employment connected with it. D, A stop-cock affixed to each box,

In the annexed figure, our readers to admit and adjust the quantity of are presented with the plan of a new steam required. Steam Apparatus, erected in the office E, A cock and pipe, to regulate the of this Magazine, for the purpose of emission of a portion of the steam Copper-plate printing.

into the air ; by which the heat of the To those who are conversant with whole range may be increased or dithis art, it is well known, that a cer- minished. tain degree of temperature in the plate, F, A chamber for the reception of is necessary to give beauty to the im- | the condensed steam ; from which it is pression. For this purpose every man conveyed by the connecting pipe. had formerly his pot of burning char- G, The work bench. coal placed before him, the fumes of H, Three feet six inches, the height which he was compelled to breathe. of the steam-box from the floor. These, it is well known, are highly per- There is a small air-cock connected nicious to human health, frequently with each box, through which the air producing dizziness and fainting; and that may collect in the pipes is exin many instances, when closely con- pelled by the force of the steam. fined, and strongly impregnated with The boiler is 6 feet long by 3 feet that deleterious fluid, carbonic acid wide, and 4 feet 3 inches high ; supplygas, numerous instances have been re- ing the steam to this apparatus, as corded, of their proving fatal to indi- well as to a range of 160 yards of other viduals. In addition to this, the lighter pipes, for the purpose of warming the particles, and the dust arising from general printing-office, consisting of the action of the fire, cannot but com- six stories of rooms. And it is worth municate filth to every part of the observing, that the expenses attending room where a considerable quantity of the use of steam, in heating the whole charcoal is used.

of these premises, are more than coBy this substitute, all the advan- vered by the saving effected in the intages arising from the use of charcoal surance, in .consequence of its adopare completely secured, without any tion. of its inconveniences. In this office, the room is now sufficiently warm for the accommodation of the workmen, Answer to a Question respecting the and the facility of their business, while

Weight of Catlle. the air, freed from the noxious eflluvia, MR. EDITOR. retains a degree of purity which can- Sir,-Willing to oblige your subscrinot but contribute to their health ; the ber A. B. C. who is desirous to have room at the same time exhibiting an his mode of calculation, col. 1045, No. appearance of cleanness, which was 11. explained, I would observe, that impossible on the old system.

in all similar bodies, and in all cyThe present method is simple, whole-linders, and even in some other bodies, some, economical, and elegant; as (the dimensions being taken in similar much superior to the former, as the parts of those bodies) if the square of principle of heating by steam is to the girths be multiplied by the lengths, that of common coal fires.

the products will be the proportional We therefore anticipate the more bulks; and if the bodies be of the same extensive application of Steam in the specific gravity, the same products various manufactories of the country, will be the proportional weights. where economy, safety, and regularity, Hence, if one of these products be are desired.

multiplied or divided by a number which reduces it to a weight of a given

denomination, any of the other proReference to the Figure.

ducts will be reduced to the same deAA, The walls at the extremities of nomination of weight by the same prothe room, which is fifty feet long.

Now multiplying by 24 and BB, A three-inch pipe to convey cutting off two figures, is the same as the steam from the boiler.

multiplying by 24 and dividing by 100, CC, Are 10 hollow cast-iron stands and if this process reduces the product or boxes, into which the steam enters, of the square of the girth and the

cess.

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conceives " that the deist or the atheist, who openly and honestly rejects the Bible, must incur less of the divine displeasure than the man (à Unitarian) who professes to believe the scriptures, and yet labours to undermine its very foundation.” I have not quite so good an opinion of deists and atheists as Mr. B. seems to have. What he considers as open honesty, I consider as brazen blasphemy. Granting that there may be (and there is no doubt) an honest deist ; the fool atheist, who openly denies the existence and perfections of that Being who created him, and whose paternal goodness supplies him with all his blessings, surely does not deserve the name of honest. Even to suspect that there is no presiding intelligence over the af'fairs of the universe, is a mark of mental imbecility ; but openly to deny it, is a conduct, to express the baseness of which, language has no name. I do not pretend to underrate the conduet of Unitarians, in purging, as they think, Christianity from its corruptions. What they consider the blemishes of Christianity, I consider its basis and beauty. Whatever degree of wickedness there is in their conduct, they certainly do not designedly and knowingly undermine the foundation of the Bible. We must leave them in the hands of God, who will certainly do right when he judgeth.

A Unitarian, of considerable literary acquirements, was, not long since, reclaimed by affectionate argument; and no other means ought ever to be employed. Bigotry, that imp of hell, never performed such an achievement, nor ever will; God will never own its work. The spirit manifested by the Bishop of Landaff

, in his answer to Thomas Paine, is most amiable; and to all orthodox writers I would say, Go thou, and do likewise.

I am, Sir, &c. MODERATUS.

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ANECDOTE OF ZENO.

AMONG the discoveries and improveTRUE philosophy consists in the love ments which distinguish the present of wisdom. This opinion was enter- age, there are scarcely any more retained by the founder of the Stoics, markable, than those which have arisen whose doctrines the following anec- from the varied application of Steam. dote places in a proper light. ---Zeno, on On an extensive scale, its power and being told that Love was unbecoming utility are well known. Scarcely a a philosopher, replied -“ If this were year elapses in which its uses are not true, the fate of the fair sex would be extended. It has found its way into lamentable, for they would only then many of our large manufactories, at be loved by fools.”

once giving motion to the most conh:

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plicated machinery, and imparting and on which the plate is laid to be warmth to those who are engaged in heated for working. the employment connected with it. D, A stop-cock affixed to each box,

In the annexed figure, our readers to admit and adjust the quantity of are presented with the plan of a new steam required. Steam Apparatus, erected in the office E, A cock and pipe, to regulate the of this Magazine, for the purpose of emission of a portion of the steam Copper-plate printing.

into the air ; by which the heat of the To those who are conversant with whole range may be increased or dithis art, it is well known, that a cer- minished. tain degree of temperature in the plate, F, A chamber for the reception of is necessary to give beauty to the im- the condensed steam ; from which it is pression. For this purpose every man conveyed by the connecting pipe. had formerly his pot of burning char- G, The work bench. coal placed before him, the fumes of H, Three feet six inches, the height which he was compelled to breathe. of the steam-box from the floor. These, it is well known, are highly per- There is a small air-cock connected nicious to human health, frequently with each box, through which the air producing dizziness and fainting; and that may collect in the pipes is exin many instances, when closely con- pelled by the force of the steam. fined, and strongly impregnated with The boiler is 6 feet long by 3 feet that deleterious fluid, carbonic acid wide, and 4 feet 3 inches high ; supplygas, numerous instances have been re- ing the steam to this apparatus, as corded

, of their proving fatal to indi- well as to a range of 160 yards of other viduals. In addition to this, the lighter pipes, for the purpose of warming the particles, and the dust arising from general printing-office, consisting of the action of the fire, cannot but com- six stories of rooms. And it is worth municate filth to every part of the observing, that the expenses attending room where a considerable quantity of the use of steam, in heating the whole charcoal is used.

of these premises, are more than coBy this substitute, all the advan- vered by the saving effected in the intages arising from the use of charcoal surance, in .consequence of its adopare completely secured, without any tion. of its inconveniences. In this office, the room is now sufficiently warm for the accommodation of the workmen, Answer to a Question respecting the and the facility of their business, while

Weight of Cattle. the air, freed from the noxious effluvia,

MR. EDITOR. retains a degree of purity which can- Sir,-Willing to oblige your subscrinot but contribute to their health; the ber A. B. C. who is desirous to have room at the same time exhibiting an his mode of calculation, col. 1045. No. appearance of cleanness, which was 11. explained, I would observe, that impossible on the old system.

in all similar bodies, and in all cypresent method is simple, whole- | linders, and even in some other bodies, some, economical, and elegant; as (the dimensions being taken in similar much superior to the former, as the parts of those bodies) if the square of principle of heating by steam is to the girths be multiplied by the lengths, that of common coal fires.

the products will be the proportional We therefore anticipate the more bulks; and if the bodies be of the same extensive application of Steam in the specific gravity, the same products farious manufactories of the country, will be the proportional weights. where economy, safety, and regularity, Hence, if one of these products be are desired.

multiplied or divided by a number which reduces it to a weight of a given

denomination, any of the other proReference to the Figure.

ducts will be reduced to the same deAA, The walls at the extremities of nomination of weight by the same prothe room, which is fifty feet long.

Now multiplying by 24 and BB, A three-inch pipe to convey cutting off two figures, is the same as the steam from the boiler.

multiplying by 24 and dividing by 100, CC, Are 10 hollow cast-iron stands and if this process reduces the product or boxes, into which the steam enters, of the square of the girth and the

The

cess.

ON THE ETERNAL SONSHIP OF CHRIST.

90

64

length to the weight in English stones, liquely through both its sides; place the in any case found by trial, it will al- part cut off upon paper, and with a pen ways do so, provided the cattle be of draw a line round it: thus you will similar figure, and of the same specific produce the conic section called an elgravity: but as this is not so accurate, lipsis, as described by Hutton, Bonnythe rule can only be considered as an castle, and all other writers on that approximation to assist in guessing the subject. weight.

If the dimensions were taken in inches, and the product divided by 7200, the same result would be obtain- In consequence of a short article comed. Thus, 90

municated by Pudicus, and inserted in col. 924, of our preceding volume,

we have received several papers on 8100 square of girt in inch. this subject, which, if published, would length.

occupy more of our room than we can

devote to its discussion. 32400

In looking over these articles, we 486

have been compelled to observe, that 6 | 518400

in general the authors of those which 72

advocate the Eternal Sonship, proceed

either to defend the doctrine of the 72 | 00 weight.

Trinity, or to establish the divinity of Here dividing by 6 and by 12 and Christ. By these means we have litcutting off two figures, is the same as tle more than a repetition of the argudividing 7200.

ments, criticisms, and expositions, Thos. EXLEY.

which have already faded before the Bristol, Jan. 6, 1820.

public eye, while the question itself is

left undecided. Reply to a Query on Elliptical Figures. The doctrine of the Trinity, and the MR. EDITOR.

Divinity of Christ, we conceive, are Sir,- If none of your correspondents alike admitted, both by those who adhave noticed the inquiry of M. P. vol. vocate, and those who oppose, the I. col. 806, I beg to advise him to be- phrase, “ Eternal Son;" and, unless we lieve Dr. Hutton and Mr. Bonnycastle, are much deceived, it is to place these or to think no more on the subject; doctrines on what has been thought or, which would be more satisfactory, more tenable ground, that the doubts to study Mathematics for himself. If of the latter have been urged against he take the last course, he will soon the terms in question. find, that the figure defined by those It has been observed by Pudicus, Mathematicians has the properties they that the subject seems to be “ more of ascribe to it, and that the error, which a Philological than of a Doctrinal naso greatly perplexes him, is in the ture.” In this light we have long surideas he has admitted ; ideas not atveyed it; and the various articles, all suggested by the definition: every which, both in print and in manuscript, diameter of that figure will have its or- have fallen under our inspection, have dinates equal at equal distances on tended uniformly to confirm us in this each side of the centre. It seems to opinion. Under this impression, we me very probable, that many proceed have extracted what we conceive to be far in error by cherishing false ideas, the essence of the question, and we forcibly presented to the mind, and wish our correspondents who have any embraced as certain truths, even while thing to advance on either side, to it is evident to the persons who admit confine their observations chiefly to the the ideas, that an error exists some- points stated below. where. Thos. Exley.

.. If human relationships had not Bristol, Jan.

existed, what idea would have been

conveyed by the term Son ? In reply to the above Query, A. B. 2. Does the term Son, necessarily of Painshaw, has furnished the follow- imply commencement of existence in ing observations.

that being or person to whom it is justly Form a cone of a piece of turnip, or applicable? any other substance, cut that cone ob

3. What is the meaning of the terms

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1820.

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