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Thad no difficulty in assenting, though ciation the fonction of its vote. perhaps he would not agree

with But it seems the French will be enthe minister as to the extent to couraged if this house should interwhich that principle might be car- fere and diēlate to the executive goried. The present question was vernment. Will they really think not, whether any minister, under worse of your energy, if they find any circumstances, thould have the that you are determined to take your confidence of the house, during a own affairs into your own hands, negociation, but whether the pre- iuftead of confiding to the present fent minifter, under the prefent ministers. Will they really expect circumstances, should possess that to make better terms of peace

with confidence? A motion was made the people of England, speaking to for peace, by an honourable gen- them through the medium of repretleman (Mr. Wilberforce) two years fentatives, than with the present ago. What was the language then executive government? Do they exDo not vote for this propofition, pect more real care of the interest of but trust in me.” He prevailed the people of England from a reignwith this house to do then what he ing faction, than from the people alks you to do now; to confide in themselves, speaking through the me. his fincerity. After a considerable dium of their representatives? I aplapse of time, a negociation was at prehend the contrary; and that, as last attempted, through the medi- we should expect more justice from um of Mr. Wickham, and after- the French people themselves, than wards carried on by the embassy of we do of

any

faction among them, so lord Malmesbury. This negociation would they from the people of Great became a subject of discussion in Britain; and, in that view, I Thould this house, which was told, after hope, that neither the republic of every means had been made use of France would be hostile to Great Brito evade all measures that could lead tain, nor the limited monarchy of this to any serious negociation, that there country be hostile to the just claims was not a heart in England so“

and true interests of the republic of fligate as to wish, nor a hand so France. I will to know what betdaftardly as to fign, nor a man to be ter pledge you could give of finderifound fo degenerate, as to be the ty to France, in your desire for peace, courier of a commission to be sent than to tell them, by a vote of the to France, to stipulate for peace.” house of commons, that you are We have tried our executive go- willing to negociate: and what is vernment enough, said Mr. Fox, to more likely to lead to a restoration be confident we can do no good to of tranquillity, upon a solid and perour country, by trying such means manent foundation? any longer. Let us now try means Colonel Fullarton observed, that that we have not tried. My opinion the present question, stripped of all is, that, let who will be the negocia- diplomatic ambiguity, food exactly tors for peace, certainly, ftill more thus: is this country prepared to if the present ministers are to be admit, that Belgium ihall not be rethe negociators, the chance of ob- stored to the emperor, and that the taining it will be infinitely increased, Rhine shall be the boundary of f parliament lhould give that nego- France. If not, the French will answer, come and take Belgium. Austria and England. If the French These are not times for entrusting lose all hope of detaching thefe the most important interests of the powers from each other, they can country to plenipotentiaries who no longer have the same object left entrench themselves behind the for pertifting in that policy; at ramparts of etiquette, and talk on least, it may no longer be impracthe stilts of ambaladorial mightiness. ticable to devise means for bringing Undoubtedly, every returning len- them to treat on general principles, timent of mutual forbearance and and collective arrangements. This amity ought, by every practicable can hardly be effecied without a mode, to be encouraged. Per- congress, in fome form or other. haps, with this view, no better Under this impression, he would beacon or directory can be found, take the liberty of reading fuch a in the annals of negociation, than form of relolutions as he conceived the conduct of our Indian govern- would meet the object in view, not ment, in the

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answer,

year 1781, when meaning, however, at all, to press French, Dutch, Mysoreans, and all, them on the house at present: were in arms against the English ; Refolved, “That it is the opiand our interest in the east were, nion of this house, that, whenever if poflible, more nnprosperous than a proper opportunity occurs, the they are at present on the con- most eligible mode of establishing tinent of Enrope. An honourable the tranquillity of Europe, on a lebaronet, now a member of this cure foundation, will be, by assemhoufe, then second in council, and bling a general congress, such as afterwards governor-general in In- took place last century, previous to dia, in conjuction with lord Mac- the peace of Munster. That the artney and fir Eyre Coote, inti- object of this congress ought to be, mated to the Mahrattas, that, unless to specify and declare to all manin so far as might be necellary to kind the principles of right and support existing engagements with wrong, which onght to govern allies, the English government was the relations between independent determined, that their operations lates; to fpecify and declare to all against the Mahrattas should be na- mankind the principles of security, val, and defensive merely. This property, and public credit, which they intimated to the Poonah go- it is necessary to recognize, and renvernment, and, from that moment, der effectual, before any pacificanot a shot was fired between the tion can be negociated with stability Mahrattas and the English. There or ho ur. is one point, which must not be .“ In the event of the Belligerent omitted. It is well known, that powers not acceding to this opinion, the French, from the commence- it will become this house to make ment of the war, have relisted all known the grounds on which the ideas of treating collectively with war is continued, to ascertain the the confederated powers : in fo form on which it is to be conducted, doing, they have proved their wil and to declare the principles on dom; for, by treating individually, which a cession of hostilities ought, they have detached every power to be concluded, on the part of his from the confederacy excepting Britannic majeily.”

Sir William Pultney faid, that ally declared its respect for personal what the parliament and the nation fafety, property, and morals, and has should require was not so much an denounced vengeance against the immediate peace, as a secure one: anarchists. It has likewise maniand this object would be accom- tested an appearance of a wish for plished by patience under our suffer- peace. It is for the French nation ings, and perseverance in the con- to realize the peace; of which their teft. As long as the enemy re- new government speaks to them tained Belgium and Holland there with eautious reserve. And this obcould be no fecurity for England. ject, a frank declaration on the part Now, was the moment to strain every of the people of England, through nerve in the struggle; and he was their representatives, of a fincere fiore fearsul that ministers would be disposition to peace, on a fair moral too forward than too tardy in bring- balis, equally conducive to the secuing matters to a termination. His rity and welfare of both nations, by complaint against them was that, on awakening the fenfibility, and gainhearing the disasters that had be- ing the confidence of the French nafallen the Imperial arms, they had tion, would materially tend to fornot immediately come down to the ward. The basis to which he alluded house, and called for a loan to invi- was a due regard to justice, private gorate the brave exertions of oor property, public credit, and the illustrious ally

rights of nations. It was time for the Sir John Macpherson spoke to the English nation to open their eyes on following effect. He thought that it the true object of the war : an obwould not be a greater proof of mo- ject which ought to be as remote deration and justice, than of sound from the spirit of vengeance, as political wisdom, to declare that we that of conqueft. It points, on the stood up only in defence of our own contrary, to a reasonable agreement rights and liberties, and not for the between the belligerent states; an purpose of encroaching on those of agreement dictated by the force of other nations. He was anxious that their wants, and founded on the insuch a declaration should be made, dispensable protection of the right not only because it would contribute of property, without which no to give peace to this country, but to state can be certain of providing all Europe, and among other na- for the subsistence of its subjects, tions, even to our enemies. The in- nor of maintaining the security of terests of Britain would be best pro- its civil order. Commerce and moted by consulting not only our modern finance having intermingled own advantage, but that of all the all property, even that of nations, civilized world: by endeavouring it follows that public credit has benot only to obtain from, but to ex- come the universal depofitary of tend to France, a just, honourable, civilized society. There is only one and solid peace. The French go- . property, and one real finance in vernment has ceased to be an incen- Europe, the circulation of which diary assembly, sanguinary dictators, is as essential to the political body, and a club of plunderers. It has as that of the blood to the human assumed the form and the tone of body: it was a violation of the regular governments. It has officie right of property that produced the

assignats, affignats, and the assignats that

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the calamities of war did not rest duced the revolution, with all the with Great Britain. To a motion miseriès suffered by France, and in- of this tendency, he did not see flicted on her neighbours. To fhew why any objection should be made a disposition, even a zeal for the by either side of the house: as it settlement of a government in

was calculated to procure an essenFrance, that should respect the tial advantage to the country, while rights of men and nations, would not it contributed to strengthen the be a greater bleffing to that country, hands of government. On these thän to all Europe. The motion grounds, he thought himself jufbefore the house had a happy ten- tified in supporting the present modency to harmonize the great body tion. of the French and English people Mr. Johnes could never forget the (who could not be said properly to ignominiousmanner in which ourambe at war with each other, though bassador had been dismissed, nor fortheir governments were) into peace give the insult offered to the nation. and good neighbourhood, by dif- The objects for which we contended countenancing and disapproving the were, our liberties, our fortunes, infinuations of insincerity, on the our religion, our God, and our part of this country, in the late ne- king! On a division of the house, gociation. It would assist ministers; there appeared for Mr. Pollen's moin proving that the prolongation of tion, 85: against it, 291.

VOL. XXXIX.

IN)

CHAPA

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Sir William Pultney said, that ally declared its respect for personal what the parliament and the nation safety, property, and morals, and has fhould require was not so much an denounced vengeance against the immediate peace, as a secure one: anarchists. It has likewise maniand this object would be accom- tested an appearance of a wish for plifhed by patience under our suffer- peace. It is for the French nation ings, and perseverance in the con- to realize the peace, of which their test. As long as the enemy re- new government speaks to them tained Belgium and Holland there with cautious reserve. And this obcould be no security for England. ject, a frank declaration on the part Now was the moment to strain every of the people of England, through nerve in the firuggle; and he was their representatives, of a fincere more fearsul that ministers would be disposition to peace, on a fair moral too forward than too tardly in bring- balis, equally conducive to the secuing matters to a termination. His rity and welfare of both nations, by complaint against them was that, on awakening the fenfibility, and gainhearing the disasters that had being the confidence of the French nafallen ihe Imperial arms, they had tion, would materially tend to fornot immediately come down to the ward. The basis to which he alluded house, and called for a loan to invi- was a due regard to justice, private gorate the brave exertions of our property, public credit, and the illuftrious ally.

rights of nations. It was time for the Sir John Macpherson spoke to the English nation to open their eyes on following effect. He thought that it the true object of the war : an obwould not be a greater proof of mo- ject which ought to be as remote deration and justice, than of found from the spirit of vengeance, as political wisdom, to declare that we that of conquest. It points, on the Itood up only in defence of our own contrary, to a reasonable agreement rights and liberties, and not for the between the belligerent states; an purpose of encroaching on those of agreement dictated by the force of other nations. He was anxious that their wants, and founded on the insuch a declaration should be made, dispensable protection of the right not only because it would contribute of property, without which no to give peace to this country, but to state can be certain of providing all Europe, and among other na

for the subsistence of its subjects, tions, evento our enemies. The in- nor of maintaining the security of terests of Britain would be best pro- its civil order. Commerce and moted by consulting not onļv our modern finance having intermingled own advantage, but that of all the all property, even that of nations, civilized world: by endeavouring it follows that public credit has benot only to obtain from, but to ex- come the universal depofitary of tend to France, a just, honourable, civilized society. There is only one and solid peace.

The French go- · property, and one real finance in vernment has ceased to be an incen- Europe, the circulation of which diary affembly, fanguinary dictators, is as essential to the political body, and a club of plunderers. It has as that of the blood to the human assumed the form and the tone of body: it was a violation of the regular governments. It has officie right of property that produced the

affignats,

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