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Delaware, Illinois, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Oregon, Tennessee, Vermont and West Virginia, the diploma is subject to supervision of some designated body vested by law with authority, to determine its validity as evidence of its possessor's qualifications for the practice of medicine. Failing the possession of such a recognized diploma, th3 right to practice may be acquired by passing a satisfactory examination.

In Arizona, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, Nevada, Ohio, South Carolina (since the repeal of the Act of 1888), Wisconsin and Wyoming, the presentation of any kind of a diploma--provided that it be from a "chartered” medical institution is the sufficient warrant in law for county clerks, clerks of courts, registrars of deeds and similarly qualified judges of medical fitness to admit to practice.

Following is a résumé of the legal requirements for practice in each State and Territory of the United States, in force Jan. 1, 1894:

Alabama.-A certificate of successful examination by the State (or a county) Board of Medical Examiners. Diplomas confer no right to practice.

Arizona.-Registry, with a county recorder of an unrevoked, uncancelled “diploma regularly issued by a medical college properly and lawfully organized under the laws of the state wherein said college shall be located.”

Arkansas.-A certificate of successful examination by the State Board of Examiners. Diplomas confer no right to practice.

California.--A certificate issued on the diploma of a college in good standing or upon a successful examination by one of the State Boards of Medical Examiners-regular, homopathic or eclectic.

Colorado.—Similar to California, except there is but one State Board of Medical Examiners.

Conneticut.-A certificate of registration of the diploma of a college "recognised as reputable by one of the chartered medical societies of the State," regular, homepathic, eclectic; or a certificate of satisfactory examination by a committee appointed for the purpose by the State Board of Health,

Delaware.-A certificate based upon the registration of a diploma from “a respectable medical college,” or upon "a full and impartial examination by the State Board of Medical Examin

ers.

District of Columbia.-Nominally the indorsement of a diploma, or an examination, by a committee of the District Medical Society; practically no requirement.

Florida.-A certificate of satisfactory examination by the State (or a district) Board of Medical Examiners. Diplomas confer no right to practice.

Georgia.—The registration of a diploma from any “incorporated medical college, medical school or university.”

Clerks of the Superior Courts are the sole judges of the diplomas evidence of fitness for medical practice.

Idaho.—The record of a diploma at a county seat.

Illinois.--A certificate issued by the State Board of Health upon the diploma of a legally chartered medical institution in good standing as determined by the Board, or upon a satisfactory examination by the Board.

Indiana.--The registration, in a county clerk's office, of a diploma "from some reputable medical college."

Indian Territory.—a. Cherokee Nation: An examination by the Board of Medical Examiners; d. Choctaw Nation: A certifi. cate by the Board of Medical Examiners; c. Creek Nation: Payment of $25 annually as a license fee.

Iowa. Similar to Illinois.

Kansas.—The registry of a diploma from "some respectable school of medicine," or of a certificate of qualification from some-State or county medical society.

Kentucky.-A certificate from the State Board of Health issued upon the "diploma of a reputable and legally chartered medical college."

Louisiana.—The record of a diploma from “any medical institution of credit and respectability" after indorsement by the State Board of Health.

Maine.—No legal requirement. In 1887 an act to regulate the practice of medicine was passed by the Legislature but was vetoed by the Governor.

Maryland.-A certificate issued upon a satisfactory examina

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tion by the State Board of Medical Examiners. Diplomas confer no right to practice.

Massachusetts.—No legal requirement.
Minnesota.-Similar to Maryland.

Mississippi.---Similar to Maryland-except that the examination is made and the certificate issued by the State Board of Health.

Missouri. -Similar to Illinois.

Montana.-Ten years of practice; a certificate upon the diploma of a college "in good standing,” or upon an examination by the State Board of Medical Examiners.

Nebraska.—A certificate issued by the State Board of Health upon the diploma of a “legally chartered medical school or college in good standing,” as defined in Section 8 of the Act of July, 1891.

Nevada.-The record of a diploma from “some regularly chartered medical school."

New Hampshire.—No legal requirement.

New Jersey.- A license issued upon a successful examination by the Bourd of Medical Examiners. Diplomas confer no right to practice.

New Mexico.-A certificate upon the diploma of a legally hartered medical institutiou in good standing, or an examinac tion by the Territorial Board of Medical Examiners.

New York.-A license issued upon a successful examination by one of the State Boards of Medical Examiners-regular, homepathic, eclectic. Diplomas confer no right to practice.

North Carolina.-A license issued upon a successsul examination by the State Board of Medical Examinera. Diplomas confer no right to practice.

North Dakota. -Similar to North Carolina.

Ohio.—The diploma of a respectable school of medicine, or a certificate of qualification from a State or county medical society.

Oklahoma--A license issued by the Superintendent of Public Health upon a medical diploma or after examination.

Oregon.—A certificate on the diploma of a college in good standing,” or after examination by the State Board of Medical Examiners.

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SVAPNIA

or PURIFIED OPIUM For Physicians' use only.

Contains the Anodyne and Soporific Alkaloids, Codeia, Narceia, and Morpnia. Excludes the Poisonous and Convulsive Alkaloids, Thebaine, Narcotine and Papaverine. Svapnia has been in steadily increasing use for over twenty

years and whenever used has given great satisfaction. To Physicians of repute, not already acquainted with

its merits, samples will be mailed on application. Svapnia is made to conform to a uniform standard of Opium

of Ten per cent. Morphia strength. JOHN FARR, Manufacturing Chemist, New York.

Charles N. Crittenton Co., General Agents, 115 FULTON STREET,

NEW YORK. To whom all orders for samples must be addressed.

SVAPNIA IS FOR SALE BY DRUGGISTS GENERALLY.

Fairchild's Pepsin as Solvent

of blood clots and muco-pus.

"In one case in which the bladder contained

"blood clots and the catarrhal mucous membrane “discharged ropy.muco-pus, pepsin injected for the “purpose of liquefying the clots, not only fulfilled "its mission in that direction, but unexpectedly "cleared out the muco.pus and left the interior of - the bladder quite clean. The process was repeated "as soon as the muco-pus again became abundant, "and the patient experienced a feeling of relief “after the simple cleansing that pepsin afforded."Fairchild's hand-book of the Digestive Ferments, April, 1892.

Samples and comple details sent gratis upon application to Fairchild Bros. & Foster, New York.

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