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tions. What inference can be drawn tained a considerable extent of terfrom this conduct, on the part of mi- ritory from that unfortunate counnisters, but that, by thus bringing try; and, in addition to his share of forward a futile, illusory, and un- the division, it is also proposed, that meaning bafis, they expected to the emperor of Germany Mall also disgust the French in the first in- be put in possession of Maestricht, stance, and so get rid of the negoci- or some other place. France is to ation and, if the French, who be left with only Savoy, Nice, and must have felt themselves mocked Avignon. Is it fair that all the by this treatment, and have been other powers fhould gain more than more and more assured of the in- France? is the state of the war fincerity of our ministers, had stop- such as to justify this proposition? ped all farther proceedings, would When Great Britain made a propothey not liave been fully justified?sition so unreasonable, France took Undoubtedly, ministers expected a step calculated to give confidence that they would have resented the to the people in those conntries the infult, and have broken off the ne- had annexed to the republic, by gociation at the outset. They thus declaring that she could not, on any hoped to have obtained easy cre- account, give them up. In the condit for their pacific intentions, and ference which took place between to have thrown upon the enemy the British ambassador and the French the odium of a determined purpose minister, the former declared, that

, of hostility, and an unreasonable the king of Great Britain would not rejection of the preliminary basis recede from his demand, with reof negociation.

Unfortunately, spect to the Netherlands. Must however, for this project, the basis not the French, in consequence of was recognized. "The disappoint- this declaration, have been induced ment of ministers was evident : lord to assume an equally resolute tone, Malmesbury was unprepared how with respect to their intention of to act, and compelled to fend for keeping that territory; when, from farther instructions. The question the nature of the terms proposed, then became, “ since the French they perceived no likelihood of obhave so unexpectedly accepted the taining peace? As to the French basis we intended to be rejected, minister having asked lord Malmes

. what can we find that they must be bury to give in his ultimatum, it indispensibly called upon to refuse?” evidently meant no more than that Lord Malmesbury, who had before he should make a formal declaration no terms to propose; was now in- of what he had said with regard to structed to bring forward such as Belgium : a demand which could could not be supposed to undergo not surely be considered as unreamuch discussion; such as could not fonable. Whatever the English readily fail to effect the purpose of ministry might think on that subject

, being rejected. The three great the world at large would consider powers of the continent of En- the memorial of lord Malmesbury rope, will all of them be left with as the fine qua non of the court of confiderable acquisitions ? The Great Britain, respecting Belgium. king of Prussia has gained a third If, Mr. Fox proceeded, the house | part of Poland ; 'Rusia has ob- fhall be of opinion, that Belgium

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is really entitled to be regarded as with great emphasis, why did not a fine qua non; that it is an object the directory present a contre projet ? for which this country ought to con- To whom should they present it? tinue the war till it has expended was the emperor a party? No, another hundred millions, and shed They had, then, no one to present the blood of half a million more it to, for, every thing contained in wretched beings: if the house think our projet was for the emperor's fo, it ought openly to declare its benefit alone. I agree with the opinion. If, on the contrary, the right honourable gentleman as to house shall think with me, that it is the principle, that a people, who not worth the risk of this country, come into the power of another to expend such immense treasures people, by the chance of war, canof money

and blood, in order to re- not, by the law of nations, be dil store it to the emperor, who, after posed of lawfully, till the definitive all, may, perhaps, in a short time, treaty of peace is concluded; but be no longer our ally: then," let this is very different from a people them act like men, and, by some fair who are left at liberty to chuse a and unequivocal amendment, con- government for themselves, and vince the country, and thew the who, after such liberty, voluntarily world, that they will not be longer adopt the step of uniting themselves fubfervient to fuch a dreadful waste with their neighbours; and those, of blood and treasure. But if it be who, perhaps, at one time, might true that the negociation was bro- have claimed over them the right ken off, on the ground that the re- of conquest. The French, Mr. Fox tention of Belgium was made a fine observed, were now, and always had qua non, on the one part; and its re- been, represented, by ministers, as a storation to the emperor a fine qua horde of affallins. Suppose the Corsin10n, on the other; I ask, on what cans had chosen the king of Great ground was this dune? Was the Britain for their king, and intreated, emperor a party to the negocia- in the strongest terms, that they might tion? Here then is a fine qua non not be given up to those affallins, made in a matter intended solely would it be said, by the British miniffor the benefit of the emperor, to ter, in a negociation for

that which, nevertheless, he is not a par- Corsica was an object of restoraty, and which we do not know tion ? Mr. Fox believed that it whether he himself would absolute would not: and might not the ly insist on or not! Surely this French use the fame arguments remight have been known before the specting Belgium? On former ocnegociation was entered upon, cafions, when the conquests in the When we were so often sending West Indies were mentioned, as fuch immense fums to the em- means of negociation, the idea of peror, inillions after millions, fome the fatus quo ante bellum was turnperson or other, employed in those ed into ridicule. Martinico, paroffices, might have asked the ques- ticularly, (though in this negociationed. Had any one done for No. tion the minister had lowered his I ask any impartial man, if this is tone) was, on those occasions, not not a mere mockery?' but, says to be confidered as a conquest in the right honourable gentleman, former wars; but as territory received at the request of the inhabi- ftances, this house cannot help fatants, who had desired to be taken menting the ralliness and injustice under the protection of his Britannic of his majesty's ministers, whose majesty. Mr. Fox concluded his long-continued miscondua has prospeech with moving, as an amend- duced this embarrassing fituation, ment to the address, that, after the by advising his majesty, before the words returning, his majesty blessing of peace had been unforthanks for his gracious message, tunately interrupted, to refuse all there be inferted the following: negociation for the adjustment of

peace,

“ That this house has learnt, the then fubfisting differences, alwith inexpreffible concern, that the though, at that time, the Nethernegociation, his majesty lately com- lands, now the main obstacle to the menced, for the restoration of peace, return of tranquillity, so far from has been unhappily frustrated. being considered as an object of

“ In so awful and momentous a contest, was solemnly renounced, crisis, the house of commons feel it and the peace of Europe offered their duty to speak to his majesty, into his majesty's hands, upon the with that freedom and earnestness basis of that renunciation, and upon which becomes men anxious to pre- the security and independence of terve the honour of his majelty's Holland, whilft the preserved her crown, and to secure the interests neutrality towards France. of his people. That, in doing this, “ That this house has farther they fincerely deplore, that they are deeply to regret that, soon after the under the necessity of declaring, commencement of the war, when, that, as well from the manner in by the vigour of his majesty's arms, which the late negociation has been with the assistance of those of his conducted, as from the substance of allies, the repnblic of Holland had the memorial, which appears to been rescued from invafion, and the have produced the abrupt termina- greatest part of the Netherlands tion of it, they have reason to think had been recovered by the empehis majesty's ministers were not fin- ror; at a time, too, when most of cere in their endeavours to procure the princes of Europe, with rethe blessings of peace, so necessary fources yet unexhausted, continued for this distressed country; and that firm in their alliance with Great all prospect of pacification seems Britain, his majesty's mimifters did intirely removed from their view: not avail themselves of this high for, on the one hand, his majesty's and commanding position, for the ministers inGft upon the restoration negociation of an honourable peace, of the Netherlands to the emperor, and the establishment of the political. as a fine qua nm, from which they balance of Europe; that, on the have pledged his majesty, not to contrary, without any example in recede; while, on the other, the the principles and practices of this executive directory of the French or any other nation, it is with pain republic, with equal pertinacity, this house recollects, his majesty's claim the preservation of that part minister refused to sel on foot any of their conquest

, as a condition negociation whatsoever with the from which they cannot depart. French republic, not upon a real or “ That, under these circum- even alleged unwillingness on his

part

part to listen to the propofitions might have procured peace with now rejected by her, or to any the country. He agreed that the other specific proposal of indemnity expence of the war was great, but or political security, but upon the confidered our success as equal to it. arrogant and insulting pretence, The emperor's and our fituation that her government was not capa

were thrown into a common stock. ble of maintaining the accustomed We were willing to relinquish our relations of peace and amity amongst acquisitions from the French, to pronations, and that, on this unfounded cure for his Imperial majesty the and merely speculative assumption, restoration of the territories he had his majesty was advised to continue loft. With respect to the possessions the war to a period when the dif- of Holland, in our hands, whick ficulties in the way of peace have were particularly connected with been so much increased, by the his share in the administration, and defect of most of the powers en- of the vast importance of which he gaged in the confederacy, and by had spoken on former occafions, it the conquests and consequent pré was his wish to keep both the Cape tensions of the French republic. and Ceylon, but never his design

That this house, having thus to take from the Dutch their trade humbly submitted to his majesty the to the Cape; which was all that reflections which his majesty's gra- they were now capable of holding cious communication immediately with advantage to themselves: for, suggest

, feel themselves in Juty as to the actual possession of the bound, for the information of his place, they were too weak to keep majesty, and the fatisfaction of an it. He appealed to the old French exhausted people, to proceed. with monarchy, for the truth of the afunremitting diligence, to investigate sertion, that one acre of land in the the causes which have produced our Austrian Netherlands is equal in present calamities, and to offer such value to a whole province of France. advice as the critical and alarming And this he did, that the house circumstance of the nation may re- might see how neceísary it was quire.”

for his majesty to demand, as a Mr. Dundas, at the same time condition of peace, that they should that he charged Mr. Fox with be restored to France. Facts would availing himlelf of his situation, as best thew which party had been. a member of that house, to plead wanting in a real detire to promote the cause of the enemy, yet allowed peace. Did the French, in any pethat his amendment was unequivo- riod, come forward to negociate, cal, fair, and open.

He called and were refused by us? If this. upon the members to make a de. had been the case, the backwards. claration, that they believed the mi- ness of ministers. to pacification nistry to have been insincere in the must have been admitted; but the late negociation for peace. Upon contrary was the truth: we had rethat illie he, for his own part, gularly used every means, from the would call on the members, as ho- note of Mr. Wickham, at Bale, nest men, to give their opinion, to the late million of lord Malmes.. whether they thought that minifters bury, to bring about fo defirable an had omitted any measures that event, without fuccoli.

ceived at the request of the inhabi- ftances, this house cannot help fatants, who had defired to be taken menting the rallness and injustice under the protection of his Britannic of his majesty's minifters, whose majesty. Mr. Fox concluded his long-continued miscondu& has prospeech with moving, as an amend- duced this embarrassing situation, ment to the address

, that, after the by advising his majesty, before the Words returning his majesty blessing of peace had been unforthanks for his gracious message,” tunately interrupted, to refuse all there be inferted the following: negociation for the adjustment of

“ That this house has learnt, the then sublisting differences, alwith inexpressible concern, that the though, at that time, the Nethernegociation, his majesty lately com- lands, now the main obstacle to the menced, for the restoration of peace, return of tranquillity, so far from has been unhappily frustrated. being considered as an object of

“ In so awful and momentous a contest, was solemnly renounced, crisis, the house of commons feel it and the peace of Europe offered their duty to speak to his majesty, into his majesty's hands, upon the with that freedom and earnestness basis of that renunciation, and upon which becomes men anxious to pre- the security and independence of terve the honour of his majesty's Holland, whilst the preserved her crown, and to secure the interests neutrality towards France. of his people. That, in doing this, That this house has farther they fincerely deplore, that they are deeply to regret that, soon after the under the necessity of declaring, commencement of the war, when, that, as well from the manner in by the vigour of his majesty's arms, which the late negociation has been with the assistance of those of his conducted, as from the substance of allies, the republic of Holland had the memorial, which appears to. been rescued from invafion, and the have produced the abrupt termina- greatest part of the Netherlands tion of it, they have reason to think had been recovered by the empehis majesty's ministers were not fin- ror; at a time, too, when most of cere in their endeavours to procure the princes of Europe, with rethe blessings of peace, so neceflary sources yet unexhausted, continued for this distressed country; and that firm in their alliance with Great all prospect of pacification seems Britain, his majesty's minifters did intirely removed from their view: not avail themselves of this high for, on the one hand, his majesty's and commanding pofition, for the ministers inlift upon the restoration negociation of an honourable peace, of the Netherlands to the emperor, and the establishment of the political as a fine qua non, from which they balance of Europe; that, on the have pledged his majesty not to contrary, without any example in recede ; while, on the other, the the principles and practices of this executive directory of the French or any other nation, it is with pain republic, with equal pertinacity, this house recollects, his majesty's claim the preservation of that part minister refused to sel on foot any of their conquest, as a condition negociation whatsoever with the from which they cannot depart. French republic, not upon a real or “That, under these circum- even alleged unwillingness on his

part

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