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DIALOGUES AND CONCERT-READINGS.

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VII. EPISODE FROM A NEW ENGLAND

TRAGEDY
X. PAUL REVERE'S RIDE
XIV. THE KING OF GLORY.
XVII. THE CHEERFUL LOCKSMITH .
XXX. Two VIEWS OF CHRISTMAS
XLVII. THE QUAKER MARTYRS .

LIX. CATILINE AND AURELIA
LXII. THE SONG OF THE FORGE
LXIV. HOTSPUR AND VERNON
LXXXV. THE TENT-SCENE BETWEEN BRU-

TUS AND CASSIUS .
XCIII. DIALOGUE BETWEEN HAMLET AND

HORATIO ...
CXII. SCENE FROM KING HENRY IV.

CXXXII. OTHELLO'S DEFENSE

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INDEX OF AUTHORS.

ALDRICH, T. B., 289.
ALLINGHAM, W., 381.
ARNOLD, GEORGE, 356.
BEATTIE, 171.
BROWN, JOHN, M. D., 110, 287.
BROWNING, ROBERT, 335.
BRYANT, W. C., 264, 311.
BURKE, EDMUND, 222 353
BURRITT, ELIHU, 227.
BURROUGHS, JOHN, 145.
BYROM, JOHN, 87.
BYRON, LORD, 260, 360.
CAIRD, JOHN, 292.
CARLYLE, T., 325, 385.
CHANNING, Rev. W. E., 378.
CHATHAM, LORD, 70, 374.
CHILD, MRS. L. M., 150.
CICERO, 125.
CLAY, HENRY, 155.
COLERIDGE, S. T., 383.
COOPER, J. F., 356.
CROLY, G., 189.
DAVID, KING, 90.
DEWEY, O., 345.
DICKENS, CHARLES, 96, 128.
EMERSON, R. W., 225.
ERSKINE, LORD, 301.
EVERETT, A. H., 117, 120.
EVERETT, EDWAP.D, 89, 350
FERGUSON, S., 129.
FOX, CHARLES JAMES, 249.
FRANCIS, CONVERS, 61.
FRISWELL, J. H., 265, 283.
GOLDSMITH, 346.
GRIFFIN. GERALD, 212.
HALL, ROBERT, 380.
HARTE, F. BRET, 126.
HAYES, ISAAC I., 203.
HEBER, BISHOP, 62.
HOLMES, O. W., 15+, 300.
HUGHES, T., 313, 316.
HUNT, LEIGH, 151, 295, 370.
INGELOW, JEAN, 303.
IRVING, WASHINGTON, 152.
KHEMNITZER, 123.
KING, T. STARR, 257.

LARDNER, DR., 329.
LEWES, G, H., 91.
LINCOLN, ABRAHAM, 382.
LINGARD, JOHN, 184.
LONGFELLOW, H. W., 72, 79, 107, 163, 238,

363, 366.
LOWELL, JAMES R., 69, 210.
LUSHINGTON, VERNON, 165.
MACAULAY, LORD, 143, 158.
MCMILLAN, Rev. H., 234, 361.
MILLER, HUGH, 215.
MILLER, JOAQUIN, 159, 246.
MILLER, THOMAS, 267.
MILTON, 243.
MIRABEAU, 211.
MITCHEL, O. M., 262.
MOORE, THOMAS, 149, 173, 186, 280.
PHILLIPS, WENDELL, 307.
PRENTISS, S. S., 278.
PRESCOTT, W. H., 101.
READ, T. B., 208.
READE, CHARLES, 214, 217.
ROBERTSON, REV. F. W., 37).
RUSKIN, JOHN, 174.
SALA, G. A., 207.
SCHILLER, 182.
SCOTT, SIR WALTER, 99, 192, 197, 272.
SHAKSPEARE, 206, 254, 275, 327, 376,
SHELLEY, P. B., 343.
SMITH, SYDNEY, 253.
SPECTATOR, 168.
STOWE, MRS. H. B., 140.
TENNYSON, ALFRED, 113, 178, 251, 3:
TILTON, THEODORE, 220.
TRENCH, R. C., 286.
TROWBRIDGE, J. T., 156.
WARE, WILLIAM, 105.
WEBSTER, DANIEL, 179.
WHITE, BLANCO, 372.
WHITTIER, J. G., 85, 93, 229.
WILSON, JOHN, 339.
WIRT, WILLIAM, 16).
WISEMAN, CARDINAL, 187.
WORDSWORTH, 136, 352.
YOUNG, 379.

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THE NEW YORK
PUSIC LIBRARY

"OTOR, INOX AND

:'DATIONS.

All art must be preceded by a certain mechanical Experiness."

GOETHE.

PRACTICAL ELOCUTION.

I. STANDARD DIRECTIONS. TAND OR SIT IN A GOOD POSITION. Body upright, chest exST

panded, shoulders thrown back, and head erect.

2. HOLD THE BOOK PROPERLY. Support the book in the left hand, with three fingers underneath,—the thumb and little finger extended above to keep the leaves down. Elbow free from the body, and forearm elevated at an angle of thirty to fortyfive degrees.

3. BREATHE BEFORE THE LUNGS ARE EMPTY OF AIR, and before necessity or fatigue forces the lungs to respire too great a volume at once.

4. KEEP THE EYE AND MIND IN ADVANCE OF THE TONGUE. That is, look ahead on the page, and see and understand clearly what you are going to say, before you speak.

5. THINK THE THOUGHTS AND FEEL THE EMOTIONS. Unless this is done the reading will be as profitless to the reader as it is dry, mechanical, and meaningless to the hearer.

6. BE IN EARNEST. Always throw yourself into the spirit of what you read, and try to do your best.

7. MAKE YOURSELF HEARD, UNDERSTOOD, AND FELT.

To do this, however, do not overstrain the voice nor pitch its tones too high. Be correct but not over-nice in the enunciation. Do not mistake theatrical bluster for expressive reading.

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