Abridgment of Murray's English Grammar: With an Appendix, Containing Exercises in Orthography, in Parsing, in Syntax, and in Punctuation

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Luther Roby, 1823 - 81 sider
 

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Side 73 - The spacious firmament on high, With all the blue ethereal sky, And spangled heavens, a shining frame, Their great original proclaim : Th' unwearied sun, from day to day, Does his Creator's power display, And publishes to every land The work of an almighty hand.
Side 71 - Vice is a monster of so frightful mien, As, to be hated, needs but to be seen; Yet seen too oft, familiar with her face, We first endure, then pity, then embrace.
Side 73 - And nightly to the listening earth Repeats the story of her birth ; Whilst all the stars that round her burn, And all the planets in their turn, Confirm the tidings as they roll, And spread the truth from pole to pole.
Side 73 - What though, in solemn silence, all Move round the dark terrestrial ball; What though no real voice nor sound Amid their radiant orbs be found; In reason's ear they all rejoice, And utter forth a glorious voice, For ever singing as they shine, The hand that made us is divine.
Side 28 - Ye or you were loved. 3. He was loved. 3. They were loved. Perfect Tense. Singular. Plural. 1. I have been loved. 1. We have been loved. 2. Thou hast been loved.
Side 45 - The only point where human bliss stands still, And tastes the good without the fall to ill ; Where only merit...
Side 28 - Tense. Singular. Plural. 1. I have been loved. 1. We have been loved. 2. Thou hast been loved. 2. Ye or you have been loved.
Side 26 - Plural. 1. I have loved. 1. We have loved. 2. Thou hast loved. 2. You have loved. 3. He has loved. 3. They have loved.
Side 18 - This refers to the nearest person or thing, and that to the more distant; as, " This man is more intelligent than that." This indicates the latter, or last mentioned; that, the former, or first mentioned; as, " Wealth and poverty are both temptations; that tends to excite pride, this, discontent.
Side 71 - All fame is foreign but of true desert, Plays round the head, but comes not to the heart : One self-approving hour whole years outweighs Of stupid starers and of loud huzzas : And more true joy Marcellus exil'd feels Than Caesar with a senate at his heels.

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