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THE

W O R K S

OF

AUGUSTUS M. TOPLADY, A. B.

LATE VICAR OF BROAD HEMBURY, DEVON.

NEW EDITION,

WITH AN ENLARGED MEMOIR OF THE AUTHOR.

IN SIX VOLUMES.

VOL. I.

LONDON:

PRINTED FOR WILLIAM BAYNES AND SON,

PATERNOSTER ROW;

AND H. S. BAYNES, EDINBURGH.

1825.

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Page

-Ax Account of the Life and Writings of the Author

1

Last will

134

Elegiac Poem on the death of the Author

142

INTRODUCTION.

Occasion of the present undertaking. Free-willers punished

with imprisonment by king Edward VI. and our first refor-

mers. Harmony between Popery and Arminianism. Re-

markable particulars concerning John Goodwin the Fifth-

monarchy-man. Case of departed infants considered • 169

SECTION I.

Free-willers the first dissenters of the reformed church of

England. Calvinism of king Edward, and of the Lord Pro-

tector Somerset. That king a prodigy of parts, piety, and

learning. Vindication of his character from the nibbling of

Papists and Arminians

211

SECTION II.

Modern Geneva arminianized, through the abolition of mini-

sterial subscriptions. Some particulars concerning Dr.

Christopher Potter. Arminianism proved on the church of

Rome. Pope Leo X. anathematizes Luther for denying the

doctrines of free-will and perfection. Luther's undaunted

behaviour on that occasion

227

SECTION III.

The council of Trent called, with a view to stem the progress

of the Calvinistic doctrines. The decisions of that council,

and therein of the Romish church at large, in favour of free-

will, conditional predestination, merit, and justification by

works

243

SECTION IV.

The Arminianism of the church of Rome farther evinced, in

her treatment of Janssenius and Quesnel. Concise history

of Janssenius and Quesnel. Concise history of Janssenius,

and of ihe celebrated five propositions. Extracts from the

hundred and one propositions of Quesnel. Bull Unigenitus 248

SECTION V.

The supposed Calvinism of Thomas Aquinas, considered. Sum-

mary of St. Austin's doctrine concerning grace

261

SECTION VI.

Some account of the Ranters, and their principles. Doctrinal

agreement between that sect and many of the modern Armi-

nians

SECTION VII.

Arminianism not the doctrine of the four first centuries. The

judgment of Barnabas, of Clement, of Ignatius, and of Poly-

carp, concerning those articles of faith which stand between

Calvinists and Arminians

SECTION VIII.

Judgment of some eminent persons, who flourished antecedent-

ly to the Reformation, concerning those points. The Albi-

genses and Waldenses. Sketch of Gotteschalcus' doctrines

and sufferings. Remigius of Lyons. Florus Magister

SECTION IX.

Judgment of eminent persons, before the Reformation, con-

tinued. John Huss, Jerom of Prague, John de Wesaliâ

SECTION X.

Judgment of several eminent persons in England, previous to

the Reformation. Bede, Bishop Grosthead, Doctor John

Wickliffe, Archbishop Bradwardin, Lord Cobham

SECTION XI.

The charge of Mahometanism refuted and retorted

SECTION XII.

Judgment of eminent English martyrs, prior to the settlement

of the Reformation. Sawtree, Claydon, Bilney, Bainham,

Tyndal, Lambert, Ascough, Barnes, Hamelton, Frith,

Wishart

SECTION XIII.

The judgment of our English reformers. Archbishop Cranmer,

Bishop Ridley, Bishop Latimer

SECTION XIV.

Judgment of the English reformers continued. Bishop Hooper,

Doctor Peter Martyr, Doctor Bucer

SECTION XV.

Of Calvin's share in the reformation of the church of England.

Honours paid to his name by our old bishops and divines.

His cordial approbation of episcopacy

PREFACE TO THE WORKS.

BY THE PUBLISHERS.

The Works of Mr. Toplady have now been long in the hands of the religious world. Nor will it be al. leged, that the estimation in which they have been so generally held, has at all been diminished, by the length of time that has elapsed, since their first publication. The grand doctrines, which it is their object especially to illustrate and establish, must be for ever interesting. They lie at the very foundation of the Christian system. And so long, therefore, as vital Christianity shall be valued among men, the Works of this Author must be esteemed a precious treasure of divine truth, till the language in which they are written, shall cease to be understood.

The doctrines here contended for with such earnestness, and supported by such evidence, are, we are bold to say, the very same which it was the leading design of the apostle Paul, in all his writings, but especially in his epistles to the Romans, the Galatians, and the Ephesians, to establish. For the proof of this assertion, we, with confidence, appeal to the Works themselves. Their Author will be found to take the apostle for his guide. He has, accordingly, been assailed by the same objections, and might, with equal truth, have made the same

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