An historical and critical review of the civil wars in Ireland, from the reign of queen Elizabeth to the settlement under ki ng William. With the state of the Irish Catholics from that settlement to 1778

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The Spaniards invade Ireland
34
The cruelty of the English army in Munster
38
A dreadful famine in Ireland
41
The greater and better part of the Irish in this war fought for the queen against their countrymen The hard terms on which they were received to mer...
43
Tirone sues for pardon and obtains it
46
BOOK II
49
A general act of oblivion
55
HI Some observation on the statutes of supremacy and unifor mity
58
Sir Arthur Chichesters government
63
The conspiracy and flight of ihe carls
68
Puritan bishops in Ireland
74
Warm contests in the Irish house of commons
75
The king thanks the Irish for their supply but order the penat laws to be put in force against them
84
Some account of the ecclesiastical courts at that juncture
88
in Ireland
89
The state of the Irish under Charles I
92
A free gift raised for the king chiefly by the natives
96
Lord Wentworths manner of modelling the Irish parlia
105
1x The remonstrance of the Irish commons to the deputy
115
BOOK IV
125
Further distress of the people of Connaught
132
Some invidious reflections on the foregoing passage consi
138
ne immediate cause of the insurrection in 1641
147
Some mi representations concerning the beginning of
153
BOOK V
159
The masssacre in IslandMage
165
The original depositions now in the possession of the uni
174
V The original examinations further considered
177
Concerning the number of murders
178
VỊI The humanity of the chiefs of the insurgents
181
The conduct of the catholic clergy during the insurrection
189
The first cause of the insurrections increasing
192
The same subject continued
194
Further misconduct of the lords justices
197
The nobility and gentry of the pale banished from Dublin
200
The justices invite the lords of the pale to a conference
201
The gentlemen of the pale assemble at Swords
204
The lords justices violate the public faith
205
The order for a general pardon limited by the justices
207
Lords justices orders concerning Roman catholic priests
211
The cause of the insurrection in Munster
213
The cause of the insurrection in Connaught
217
Further severities of the lords justices
220
The gentlemen of the pale petition the king and parlia ment
222
Barbarous orders of the lords justices and council to the earl of Ormond
225
Orders of the English parliament relative to Ireland
227
BOOK VI
229
The king consents to hear the grievances of the insur gents
233
Another contrivance of the justices to hinder the cessation 295
235
Sir William Parsons displaced from the government
239
His majestys commissioners meet those of the confederate catholics to treat of the cessation
241
The cessation at last concluded
243
The advantages of the cessation to his majestys army
246
The cessation violated by his majestys forces in Ulster O
248
The covenant brought into Ireland further breaches of the cessation by the Scotch and English forces O
250
The revolt of lord Inchiquin
253
The confederates send supplies to the king
255
The confederates press the marquis of Ormond to take the command of their forces
260
The king sends Ormond a commission to conclude a peace with the confederates
263
The treaty of peace adjourned
265
The earl of Clanrickard expostulates with Ormond upon his last answer to the confederates commissioners
268
CHAP PAOLA
271
Glamorgan now freed from his confinement treats with
279
Peace concluded with the marquis of Ormond
286
The king is prevailed on by the Scots to forbid Ormond
293
Owen ONial and the Nuncio reject the peace
300
The marquis of Ormond pursues his treaty with the core
307
Cromwells policy to reduce Ireland
350
Owen ONial submits to che peace Inchiquins forces revolt to the rebels P
353
The marquis of Ormond desires leave to quit the kingdom
358
The king is invited to Scotland
360
The king secretly regrets this measure
363
Proceedings of the bishops at Jamestown 964
364
Ormond approved and advised the kings agreement with the Scots
366
XXXH The real cause of the clergys proceedings at Jamestown
368
The clergys proceedings at Jamestown disapproved of by the generality of the Irish catholics
370
The presbytery of Bangors proceedings on the peace 873
373
The total defection of the protestant forces 976
375
Treaty with the duke of Lorrain
377
The treaty with the duke of Lorrain considered
380
BOOK IX
386
The transplantation of the Irish into Connaught
388
High courts of justice in Ireland
391
Henry Cromwells administration in Ireland
398
Contrivances of sir Charles Coote and lord Broghill
401
Commissioners sent from Ireland their characters and de sign
403
The Irish catholics excluded out of the general act of obli vion
404
A proclamation published against the Irish
405
The Irish parliament
406
False reports of a conspiracy against the Irish considered The effects of these reports
410
The parties principally suspected of this conspiracy volun tarily appear before the lords justices in order to detect
412
Loalty of the catholic nobility and gentry of Ireland at this juncture
413
CRAP PAGI XIII The Irish clergys remonstrance of loyalty
416
The duke of Ormonds design in permitting this meeting of the Irish clergy
419
The king confesses his obligation to make good the peace of the year 1648
421
Ormonds reasons for his opposition to the Irish considered
422
The earl of Orrery abuses the kings confidence with re spect to the settlement of Ireland
424
The affairs of Ireland brought before the English council
426
The sufferings of the Irish set forth by their agents before the king and council
428
A court of claims appointed in Ireland
432
The time limited for holding these courts found too short and not suffered to be enlarged 496
436
An enlary ement of time for hearing all the claimants by whom hindered 499
439
Some reflections on the foregoing acts
443
a dangerous conspiracy of the puritans
446
The duke of Ormond apologizes for the favour he had shewn to the Cromwellian party in Ireland
448
The probable motives of the duke of Ormonds past and present conduct with respect to the Irish
450
The duke of Ormond befriends the Irish
453
BOOK X
459
The same subject continued in general
461
Particular facts related in Archbishop Kings book proved false concerning pupish judges and juries
462
The execution of captain Ashton
464
The affair of the quowarrantos against the corporations not truly stated by Dr King
465
The behaviour of the Irish priests and new recruits under King James impartially considered
469
The conduct of the Irish and English army compared
471
Irisb rapparees
474
A conspiracy of the protestants of Dulilin against the go vernment
478
The disarming of the protestants further considered
482
General De Rosens cruelty before Derry considered
483
King James countermands De Rosens order
487
The protestants of Ireland were not deprived of their churches by King James as Dr King sets forth
491
XV1 The perplexity of the established clergy of Ireland after
498
A short sketch of the cruelties inflicted on the Irish prisoners
506
Infringement of the articles of Limerick
526
Penal laws to prevent the further growth of popery
533
Penal laws enforced in the reign of King George II
552
A bill for nuturalizing the Jews passes the house of commons
558
Tumults in Munster considered
566
Reflections on the foregoing subject
577
APPENDIX
587
NO PAGES
611
Intelligence from his majestys army in Scotland to the lord
633
The heads of the causes which moved the northern Irish
640
Extract of Dr Gorgehis letter to colonel Hamilton
646
XVII The coronation oath of James II
660

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Populære passager

Side 21 - ... and if they found a plot of watercresses or shamrocks, there they flocked as to a feast for the time...
Side xv - ... and images; nay even their transubstantiation. But while they acknowledge a foreign power, superior to the sovereignty of the kingdom, they cannot complain if the laws of that kingdom will not treat them upon the footing of good subjects.
Side 499 - Mount-Leinster, now belonging to the regiments in the aforesaid garrisons and quarters of the Irish army, who were beyond the seas, and sent thither upon affairs of their respective regiments, or the army in general, shall have the benefit and advantage of the second article, provided they return hither within the space of eight months from the date of these presents, and submit to their Majesties' government, and take the above-mentioned oath.
Side 498 - Mayo, or any of them ; and all the commissioned officers in their majesties' quarters that belong to the Irish regiments now in being, that are treated with, and who are not prisoners of war, or have taken protection, and who shall return and submit to their majesties...
Side 499 - ... provided also, that no person whatsoever shall have or enjoy the benefit of this article, that shall neglect or refuse to take the oath of allegiance,* made by act of parliament in England, in the first year of the reign of their present majesties, when thereunto required.
Side 498 - The Roman catholics of this kingdom shall enjoy such privileges in the exercise of their religion, as are consistent with the laws of Ireland, or as they did enjoy in the reign of king Charles II.; and their majesties, as soon as their affairs will permit them to summon a parliament in this kingdom, will endeavour to procure the said Roman catholics such further security in that particular, as may preserve them from any disturbance upon the account of their said religion.
Side 502 - ... should be inserted and be part of the said articles, which words having been casually omitted by the writer, the omission was not discovered till after the said articles were signed, but was taken notice of before the second town was surrendered ; and that our said Justices and...
Side 140 - Some time before the rebellion broke out,'x says Mr. Carte, " it was confidently reported, that sir John Clothworthy, who well knew the desigus of the faction that governed the house of commons in England, had declared there in a speech, that the conversion of the papists in Ireland, was only to be effected by the bible in one hand and the sword in the other; and Mr.
Side 502 - ... that our said Justices and General, or one of them, did promise that the said clause should be made good, it being within the intention of the capitulation and inserted in the foul...
Side 52 - This bred such comfort and security in the hearts of all men as thereupon ensued the calmest and most universal peace that ever was seen in Ireland.

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