Marmion: A Tale of Flodden Field

Forsideomslag
Cosimo, Inc., 1. nov. 2005 - 292 sider
And now the midnight draught of sleep, Where wine and spices richly steep, In massive bowl of silver deep, The page presents on knee.Lord Marmion drank a fair good rest, The captain pledged his noble guest, The cup went through among the rest, Who drained it merrily...-from MarmionFantastically successful when it was first published in 1808 and a bestseller throughout the 19th-century, this is Scott's epic poem of the 1513 Battle of Flodden Field, an enormous military disaster for Scotland in which the English killed King James IV and most of his nobles, and "all was lost," Scott said of the debacle, "but our honour." With a hero, Lord Marmion, who is by turns both upright and villainous, and its sweeping air of romantic and political intrigue, this rich tapestry of verse remains favorite of Scott devotees today.Scottish novelist and poet SIR WALTER SCOTT (1771-1832), a literary hero of his native land, turned to writing only when his law practice and printing business foundered. Among his most beloved works are The Lady of the Lake (1810), Rob Roy (1818), and Ivanhoe (1820).

Fra bogen

Hvad folk siger - Skriv en anmeldelse

Vi har ikke fundet nogen anmeldelser de normale steder.

Indhold

I
1
II
18
III
56
IV
94
V
129
VI
168
VII
223
VIII
273
Copyright

Andre udgaver - Se alle

Almindelige termer og sætninger

Populære passager

Side 182 - Eske river where ford there was none; But ere he alighted at Netherby gate The bride had consented, the gallant came late: For a laggard in love and a dastard in war Was to wed the fair Ellen of brave Lochinvar. So boldly he...
Side 182 - The bride kissed the goblet : the knight took it up, He quaffed off the wine, and he threw down the cup. She looked down to blush, and she looked up to sigh, With a smile on her lips and a tear in her eye. He took her soft hand, ere her mother could bar, 'Now tread we a measure !
Side 182 - Eske river where ford there was none; But, ere he alighted at Netherby gate, The bride had consented — the gallant came late; For a laggard in love, and a dastard in war, Was to wed the fair Ellen of brave Lochinvar.
Side 253 - And sudden, as he spoke, From the sharp ridges of the hill, All downward to the banks of Till, Was wreathed in sable smoke. Volumed and vast, and rolling far, The cloud enveloped Scotland's war As down the hill they broke; Nor martial shout, nor minstrel tone, Announced their march; their tread alone, At times one warning trumpet blown, At times a stifled hum, Told England, from his mountain-throne King James did rushing come.
Side 87 - Till twice an hundred years roll'd o'er ; When she, the bold enchantress came, With fearless hand and heart on flame ! From the pale willow snatch'd the treasure, And swept it with a kindred measure, Till Avon's swans, while rung the grove With Montfort's hate and Basil's love, Awakening at the inspired strain, Deem'd their own Shakspeare lived again.
Side 254 - At length the freshening western blast Aside the shroud of battle cast; And first the ridge of mingled spears Above the brightening cloud appears; And in the smoke the pennons flew, As in the storm the white sea-mew. Then marked they, dashing broad and far, The broken billows of the war, And plumed crests of chieftains brave Floating like foam upon the wave...

Henvisninger til denne bog

Om forfatteren (2005)

Walter Scott was born in Edinburgh, Scotland on August 15, 1771. He began his literary career by writing metrical tales. The Lay of the Last Minstrel, Marmion, and The Lady of the Lake made him the most popular poet of his day. Sixty-five hundred copies of The Lay of the Last Minstrel were sold in the first three years, a record sale for poetry. His other poems include The Vision of Don Roderick, Rokeby, and The Lord of the Isles. He then abandoned poetry for prose. In 1814, he anonymously published a historical novel, Waverly, or, Sixty Years Since, the first of the series known as the Waverley novels. He wrote 23 novels anonymously during the next 13 years. The first master of historical fiction, he wrote novels that are historical in background rather than in character: A fictitious person always holds the foreground. In their historical sequence, the Waverley novels range in setting from the year 1090, the time of the First Crusade, to 1700, the period covered in St. Roman's Well (1824), set in a Scottish watering place. His other works include Ivanhoe, Rob Roy, and The Bride of Lammermoor. He died on September 21, 1832.

Bibliografiske oplysninger