Billeder på siden
PDF
ePub

services, had placed him in the rank days afterwards, the minister of fo. of the most clieemed and respected reign ciations informed the recal. in the nation. The direct object led American minister, that the of his mission was expressed in his Executive Directory had determinletter of credence to the French ed not to receive another Minifter Republic, being “ to maintain that Plenipotentiary from the United good understanding which, from States, until after the redress of the commencement of the alliance, grievances demanded of the Ame. had fubfifled between the two na- rican government, and which the tions; and to efface unfavourable French Republic iad a right to eximpressions, banish suspicions, and peet from it. The American mi, restore that cordiality vihich was at nister immediately endeavoured to once the evidence and pledge or a ascertain whether,, by refusing to friendly union,” And his instruc- receive hi'n, it was intended that he tions were to the same effect, fould retire from the territories of

faitsfully to represent the dispo- the French Republic; and verbal lition of the government and peo- answers were given, that such was ple of the United States, their dif- the intention of the Directory. For position being one, to remove jea; his own justification he desired a lousies and obviate complaints, by wiitten answer; but obtained none howing iliat they weegrorudless; until towards the last of January; to restore that mutuai confidence when, receiving notice in writing which had been so unfortunately to quit the territories of the Repuband injuriously impaired; and to lic, be proceeded to Amsterdam, explain the relative interests of both where ne proposed to wait for incountries, and the real sentiments structions from this government. of his own.”

During his residence at Paris cards A minister thus specially conimis- of hospitality were refused him; and fioned; it was expected would have he was threa ened with being subproved the instrument of resoring jected to the jurisdiction of the mutual confidence between the two minister of police: but with be, republics: the first step of the French coming firmness he infifted on the government corresponded with that protection of the law of nations, expeétation ; a few days before his due to him as the known minister arrival at Paris, the French minister of a foreign power. You will de: of foreign relations informed the rive further information from hiş American minister, then resident at dispatches, which will be laid be: Paris, of the formalities to be ob- fore you. served by himself in taking leave, As it is often necessary that naand by his fucceffor, preparatory to tions should treat for the mutual his reception. These formalities advantage of their affairs, and espethey observed; and on the ninth of cially to accommodate and terminate December presented officially to differences, and as they can treat the minifter of foreign relations, only by ministers, the right of emthe one a copy of his letter of re- bally is well known, and established call; the other a copy of his letters by the law and usage of nations. of credence. These were laid be. The refusal on the part of France fore the Exccutive Directory. Two lo receive and hear our minister, is

then then the denial of a right; but the be forgotten : they have inflicted a refusal to receive him until we have wound in the American breast. It acceded to their demands without is my sincere desire, however, that discussion, and without investiga- it may be healed ; it is my fincere tion, is to treat us neither as allies, defire, and in this I presume I connor as friends, nor as a sovereign cur with you, and with our constistate.

tuents, to preserve peace and friendWith this conduct of the French fhip with all nations : and believe government, it will be proper to ing that neither the honour nor the take into view the public audience interest of the United States absogiven to the late minister of the lutely forbid the repetition of adUnited States, on his taking leave vances for securing these desirable. of the Executive Directory. The objects with France, I shall institute fpeech of the President discloses a fresh attempt at negotiation ; and sentiments more alarming than the shall not fail to promote and accelerefusal of a minister, because more rate an accommodation, on terms dangerous to our independence and compatible with the rights, duties, union; and at the same time studi- interests, and honour of the nation. ously marked with indignities to- If we have committed errors, and wards the government of the Unit- these can be demonstrated, we shall ed States. It evinces a disposition be willing to correct them; if we to separate the people of the Unit- have done injuries, we shall be willed States from the government; to ing on conviction to redress them; persuade them that they have diffe- and equal measures of justice we rent affections, principles, and inte- have a right to expect from France, rests, from those of their fellow-ci- and every other nation. The ditizens, whom they themselves have plomatic intercourse between the chosen to manage their common United States and France being at concerns, and thus to produce divi- present suspended, the government fions fatal to our peace. Such at- has no means of obtaining official tempts ought to be repelled, with a information from that country, decision which shall convince France nevertheless there is reason to beand the world that we are not a lieve that the Executive Directory degraded people, humiliated under passed a decree on the 2d of March a colonial spirit of fear, and sense last, contravening in part the treaof inferiority, fitted to be the mise- ty of amity and commerce of 1778, rable instruments of foreign in- injurious to our lawful commerce, fluence, and regardless of national and endangering the lives of our honour, character, and interest. citizens. A copy of this decree.

I should have been happy to have will be laid before you. thrown a veilover these transactions, While we are endeavouring to if it had been possible to conceal adjutt all our differences with France them; but they have passed on ine by amicable negotiation, the progreat theatre of the world in the gress of the war in Europe, the deface of all Europe and America, predations on our commerce, the and with such circumstances of pub- personal injuries to our citizens, licity and folemnity, that they can- and the general complexion of af10t be disguised, and will not foon fairs, render it my indispensable

[ocr errors]

services, had placed him in the rank days afterwards, the minister of fo: of the most clieemed and respected reign iliations informed the recalin the nation. The direct object led American minister, that the of his mission was expressed in his Executive Directory had determinletter of credence to the French ed not to receive another Minifter Republic, being " to maintain that Plenipotentiary from the United good understanding which, from States, until after the redress of the commencement of the alliance, grievances der anded of the Ame. had fubfifled between the two na- rican government, and which the tions; and to efface unfavourable French Republic iad a right to eximpressions, banish fufpicions, and pect from it. The American mi, restore that cordiality vihich was at nister immediately endeavoured to once the evidence and pledge or a ascertain whether,, by refusing to friendly union,” And his instruc- receive hi'n, it was intended that he tions were to the same effect, mould retire from the territories of “ faithfully to represent the difpo- the French Republic; and verbal lition of the government and peo- answers were given, that such was ple of the United States, their dis- the intention of the Directory. For position being one, to remove jea, his own justification he desired a lousies and obviate complaints, by wiitten answer; but obtained none Ihowing that they w'e e groundless; until towards the last of Jan uary; to restore that mutuai confidence when, receiving notice in writing which had been so unfortunately to quit the territories of the Repuband injuriously impaired; and to ļic, be proceeded to Amsterdam, explain the relative interests of both where le proposed to wait for incountries, and the real sentiments structions from this government. of his own.

During his residence at Paris cards A minister thus specially commis- of hospitality were refused him; and fioned, it was expected would have he was threa ened with being subproved the instrument of restoring jected to the jurisdiction of the mutual confidence between the two minister of police : but with bez republics: the first step of the French coming firmness he insisted on the government corresponded with that protection of the law of nations, expeétation ; a few days before his due to him as the known minister arrival at Paris, the French minister of a foreign power. You will de of foreign relations informed the rive further information from hiş American minister, then resident at dispatches, which will be laid be: Paris, of the formalities to be ob- fore you. served by himself in taking leave, As it is often necessary that na and by his succesfor, preparatory to tions should treat for the mutua! his reception. These formalities advantage of their affairs, and espethey observed; and on the ninth of cially to accommodate and terminate December presented officially to differences, and as they can treat the minister of foreign relations, only by ministers, the right of emthe one a copy of his letter of re- balty is well known, and established call; the other a copy of his letters by the law and usage of nations. of credence. There were laid be- The refusal on the part of France fore the Exccutive Directory. Two to receive and hear our minister, is

then then the denial of a right; but the be forgotten : they have inflicted a refusal to receive him until we have wound in the Ainerican breast. It acceded to their demands without is my sincere desire, however, that discussion, and without investiga- it may be healed : it is my sincere tion, is to treat us neither as allies, desire, and in this I prefume I connor as friends, nor as a sovereign cur with you, and with our constistate.

tuents, to preserve peace and friendWith this conduct of the French fhip with all nations: and believ. government, it will be proper to ing that neither the honour nor the take into view the public audience interest of the United States absogiven to the late minister of the lutely forbid the repetition of adUnited States, on his taking leave vances for securing these desirable. of the Executive Directory. The objects with France, I shall inititute fpeech of the President discloses a fresh attempt at negotiation; and sentiments more alarming than the shall not fail to promote and accelerefusal of a minister, because more rate an accommodation, on terms dangerous to our independence and compatible with the rights, duties, union; and at the same time studi- interests, and honour of the nation. ously marked with indignities to. If we have committed errors, and wards the government of the Unit- these can be demonstrated, we shall ed States. It evinces a disposition be willing to correct them; if we to separate the people of the Unit- have done injuries, we shall be will. ed States from the government; to ing on conviction to redress them; persuade them that they have diffe- and equal measures of justice we rent affections, principles, and inte- have a right to expect from France, rests, from those of their fellow-ci- and every other nation. The ditizens, whom they themselves have plomatic intercourse between the -chosen to manage their common United States and France being at concerns, and thus to produce divi- present suspended, the government fions fatal to our peace. Such at- has no means of obtaining official tempts ought to be repelled, with a information from that country : decision which shall convince France nevertheless there is reason to beand the world that we are not a lieve that the Executive Directory degraded people, humiliated under passed a decree on the 2d of March a colonial spirit of fear, and sense last, contravening in part the treaof inferiority, fitted to be the mise- ty of amity and commerce of .1778, rable instruments of foreign in- injurious to our lawful commerce, fluence, and regardless of national and endangering the lives of our honour, character, and interest. citizens. A copy of this decree .

I should have been happy to have will be laid before you. thrown a veilover these transactions, While we are endeavouring to if it had been possible to conceal adjuft all our differences with France them; but they have passeni on ine by amicable negotiation, the progreat theatre of the world in the gress of the war in Europe, the deface of all Europe and America, predations on our commerce, the and with such circumstances of pub- personal injuries to our citizens, licity and folemnity, that they can and the general complexion of afpot be disguised, and will not foon fairs, render it my indispensable

duty

duty to recommend to your confi- present abilities of the union, would deration effectual measures of de- have been fuficient to have baffied fence.

mány formidable transportations of · The commerce of the United troops from one state to another, States has become an interesting ob- which were then practised. Our ject of attention, whether we con- sea-coasts, from their great extent, sider it in relation to the wealth are more easily annoyed, and more and finances, or the strength and eally defended by a naval force resources of the nation. With a than any other: with all the matefea-coast of near two thousand miles rials our country abounds; in skill in extent, opening a wide field for our naval architects and navigators fisheries, navigation, and commerce, are equal to any; and commanders a grcat portion of our citizens natu- and seamen will not be wanting. rally apply their industry and enter- But although the establishment prize to these objects. Any serious of a permanent system of naval de and permanent injury to commerce fence appears to be requisite, I am would not fail to produce the moft sensible it cannot be formed fo embarrassing disorders: to prevent fpeedily and extensively as the preit from being undermined and de- fent crisis demands. Hitherto I stroyed, it is essential that it receive have thought proper to prevent the an adequate protection.

failing of armed vessels, except on The naval establishment must oc- voyages to the East Indies, where cur to every man who considers the general usage, and the danger from injuries committed on our com- pirates, appeared to render the permerce, the insults offered to our mission proper ; yet the reftri&tion citizens, and the description of the has originated folely from a wish to vessels by which these abuses have prevent collusions with the powers been practised. As the sufferings at war, contravening the act of of our mercantile and fea-faring Congress of June, 1794, and not citizens cannot be ascribed to the from any doubt entertained by me omiffion of duties demandable, con- of the policy and propriety of persidering the neutral situation of our mitting our vessels to employ means country, they are to be ttributed of defence while engaged in a law. to the hope of impunity, arising ful foreign commerce. It remains from a supposed inability on our for Congress to prescribe such regu-' part to afford protection. To re- lations as will enable our sea-faring fist the consequences of such im- citizens to defend themselves againit preslions on the minds of foreign violations of the law of nations, and nations, and to guard against the at the same time restrain them from degradation and servility which they committing acts of hoftility against must finally stamp on the American the powers at war.

In addition to character, is an important duiy of these voluntary provisions for degovernment.

fence by individual citizens, it apA naval power, next to the mili- pears to me necessary to equip the tia, is the natural defence of the frigates, and provide other vessels United States. The experience of of inferior force, to take under conthe last war would be sufficient to voy such merchant vessels as shall Thow that a moderate naval force, remain unarmed. ich as would be easily within the The greater part of the cruisers,

whose

« ForrigeFortsæt »