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come to his knowledge, and of the people with confidence in gowhich, indeed, he had recently vernment, would quickly call forth been witness. In addresing his that fond affection of the inhabimajesty, to the effect proposed, the tants of Ireland to this country, house would not only exercise one which circumstances might cloud, of its most important privileges, but could not extinguith; inspire but fulfill one of its most important that zeal so necesary in the preduties. If it appeared that the sent moment; and furnish those recounsellors, more immediately about fources which were requisite for his majesty's perfon, his majelly's the critical situation in which we ministers, had not given that ad- were placed, and the arduous convice which was calculated to en- test in which we were engaged. sure the happiness and prosperity On these grounds he relied the of Ireland, it was the duty of their motion which he was now to prolordship's to approach the throne pofe: “ That a humble address with advice more wise and falu- be presented to his majesty, praytary. But it might be said, What ing that he would be graciously influence could such an address pleafed to interpose his paternal carry with it, to change the coun- and beneficent interference to allay cils by which Ireland was govern- the discontents which at present ed> To prove the influence of fubfist in his kingdom of Ireland, the British cabinet he appealed to and which threaten the dearest ina recent fact: he meant the recall terests of the British empire.” of the earl Fitzwilliam, at a time Lord Grenville faid, in reply to when all Ireland concurred in the lord Moira, that his motion could measures which he pursued, when not be adopted without breaking the that country gave the faireft pro- folemn contract which had been enspect of tranquillity, and the surest tered into between the two counpledge of aslistance and support tries; without tearing asunder every to Britain, in the arduous circum- bond of union and connection, and stances in which she was placed. spreading distraction and division It might be alked, What plan he wish- between the members of the British ed to pursue? This, lord Moira ob- empire. He should, tkerefore, give served, was indicated in the motion, his decided opposition to the prehe was about to make, itself. When fent motion, and every proposition they addresled his majesty to inter- of a similar tendency. The motion pose his paternal care and benevo- he considered, first, as unnecessary; lence, the known goodness of his fecondly, as mischievous. Under nature left no room for doubt as the first heaci he expatiated on the to the result. It was by temper, mealures that had been taken by equily and good faith, that the his majesty, in the course of a reign distractions of Ireland were to be of thirty-lix years, from year to appeased, and their affections con- year, to remove every ground of ciliated. No good could be ex

uneasiness or discontent which the pected from a profecution of the fituation of the Irish presented; the present system. He was confi- improved state of their commerce ; dent, however, that the adoption their full enjoyment of civil and of measures, calculated to impress religious liberty; the Catholics ad

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which, fo far from having been ne- or on which, at least, they were glected, had been the object of par- rested. ticular attention. The house having In the house of peers, the earl divided on lord Albemarle's motion, of Moira rose to make a motion, it appeared that it was rejected by of which, as usual in all fimilar 74 against 14.

cases, he had given previous notice, The noble secretary's repeated respecting Ireland, on the twentyaflurances, respecting the security, first of March. The exordium of external and internal

, of Ireland, his lordship's speech turned on the were not satisfactory to the mem- delicacy that was to be observed, bers in opposition to government, in 'agitating questions in which nor to fome not always or often in separate and independant legislaopposition, in both houses of par- tures, --in agitating questions in

, Jiament. Motions for inquiries into which the privileges and the inthe internal state, and allaying the dependence of each other, were discontents, of Ireland were made, involved. Yet, when urgent cases ard gave rise to animated and long render interference necessary, the debates in both houses. Of these delicacy, which may be observed, debates, however, it would be un- may remove € ery jealousy which neceliary and even nugatory to give might otherwise be excited; and other than a very summary account: it would be meritorious for the

а as the explosion which Town after different parties mutually to matook place throws greater light on nifest their attention, and their the fituation of Ireland than was, anxiety, for objects in which their at this time, enjoyed, proves or

common interests' were disproves the statements of facts, on ed. On these grounds he had which much of those debates was now risen, for the purpose of founded; and, on the whole, finks moving a humble address to his much of the interest in those tem- majesty, that he would be graporary and temporizing effufions, ciously pleased to interpose his pain the events which it produced, ternal and beneficent interference and the new spirit and order of to remedy the discontents which affairs by which these have been prevailed in Ireland, and which succeeded. And here we shall take create the most serious alarm for occasion, once for all, to observe, the dearest interests of that counthat, in relating the transactions of try, and of the British empire.parliament, it is not so much our The extent and rapid increase object to display the eloquence of of the discontents, which prevailed the different speakers, which would in Ireland, were subjects of suffwell our narrative to the size of ficient notoriety to form the ground several volumes,* as to purfue the of this proceeding. He should abthread of the main reasoning on stain, therefore, from an enumerawhich the main decisions turned, tion of the particulars which had

concern

* The curiosity of knowing what was said, on such and such an occasion, by such and such a speaker, will be best gratified by the newspapers and magazines of the day ; and the annual volumes of parliamentary debates.

come

come to his knowledge, and of the people with confidence in gowhich, indeed, he had recently vernment, would quickly call forth been witness. In addresling his that fond affection of the inhabia majesty, to the effect proposed, the tants of Ireland to this country, house would not only exercise one which circumstances might cloud, of its most important privileges, but could not extinguith; inspire but fulfill one of its most important that zeal so neceflary in the preduties. If it appeared that the fent moment; and furnish those recounsellors, more immediately about fources which were requisite for his majesty's perfon, his majesty's the critical situation in which we ministers, had not given that ad- were placed, and the arduous convice which was calculated to en- test in which we were engaged. sure the happiness and prosperity On these grounds he rested the of Ireland, it was the duty of their motion which he was now to prolordship’s to approach the throne pose: " That a humble address with advice more wise and salu- be presented to his majesty, praytary. But it might be said, What ing that he would be graciously influence could fuch an address pleased to interpose his paternal carry with it, to change the coun- and beneficent interference to allay cils by which Ireland was govern- the discontents which at present ed> To prove the influence of subsist in his kingdom of Ireland, the British cabinet he appealed to and which threaten the dearest ina recent fact: he meant the recall terests of the British empire.” of the earl Fitzwilliam, at a time Lord Grenville faid, 'in reply to when all Ireland concurred in the lord Moira, that his motion could measures which he pursued, when not be adopted without breaking the that country gave the fairest pro- folemn contract which had been enspect of tranquillity, and the furest tered into between the two counpledge of aslistavce and support tries; without tearing asunder every to Britain, in the arduous circum- bond of union and connection, and stances in which she was placed. spreading distraction and division It might be asked, What plan he wish- between the members of the British ed to pursue? This, lord Moira ob- empire. He should, tkerefore, give served, was indicated in the motion, his decided opposition to the prehe was about to make, itself. When sent motion, and every propofition they addressed his majesty to inter- of a similar tendency. The motion pose his paternal care and benevo- he considered, first, as unnecessary; lence, the known goodness of his fecondly, as mischievous. Under nature left no room for doubt as the first head he expatiated on the to the result. It was by temper, mealures that had been taken by equity and good faith, 'that the his majesty, in the course of a reign difiractions of Ireland were to be of thirty-lix years, from year to appeased, and their affections con- year, to remove every ground of ciliated. No good could be ex- uneasiness or discontent which the pected from a profecution of the fituation of the Irish presented; the present fyftem. He was confi- improved state of their commerce ; dent, however, that the adoption their full enjoyment of civil and of measures, calculated to impress religious liberty; the Catholics admitted to the enjoyment of their conftitution, the best way to fix their propertv; a participation in every attachment to it, was, to engage civil and social blelling, and even their confidence in its favour. The faring in the right of voting for earl Fitzwilliam admitted the immembers of parliament. Nor were proved state of Ireland. But what the people of Ireland insensible or ever circumstances might have conungrateful for the benefits they had tributed to that prosperity, still there received: their good difpofitions, might remain room for fomething and contentment with their fitua- farther to be done. The noble tion, he inferred from fundry cir- fecretary had faid, that the people cumstances, particularly, their rea- of Ireland were not distracted and diness to refitt and repel the threat- discontented, but tranquil and hapened invafion. With regard to the py Was it a proof of this, that mischievous tendency of the motion, acts of indemnity had been passed, lord Grenville remarked a distinc- in the Irisn parliament, for proceedtion between the fubject of this, ings beyond the law, which must and the cases of common intereft, have been called for by a conduct ftated by lord Moira, which were not very consistent with tranquil. fair objects of negociation. The lity. If no circumstances of difo motion was intended to be applied order appeared, why were whole to the internal state of Ireland, and parishes, baronies, and even couneven. if he understood it rightly, ties, declared to be out of the to the frame of its independent king's peace? It was likewise legifature. Though the British le- ftated, in the proceedings of the giliature had refirained parliament government in Ireland, that they from entertaining any bill which were, in certain districts, difarming prelended, in any degree, to bind the people, from which it was The inhabitants of Ireland; their evident they had

in arms. lordhips were now called upon to The earl of Liverpool, after reinterfere in a point most exclusively peating and approving the reasonrelating to the internal state of that ing of lord Grenville, put the case country. Such an interference was of a motion beivg made, in the obviously improper: it was, besides, Irish parliament, for the purpose impollible for them to proceed with of inducing it to interfere in the fufficient information, which lay difcuflion of the great question of much more within the reach of their parliamentary reform, or Catholic own legislature. Farther still, the tuleration in this country. How, interference of the British legisla- he asked, would such a motion be ture, instead of remedying the dif- taken by the British parliament ? contents, which were alleged to The motion, before their lord ship's, prevail, would inflame them. It seemed to him to be as mischie. would induce the people of Ireland vous in its tendency, as unconstito imagine that their own legila- tutional in its principle, wherefore ture was indifferent to their wel- he would give it his most decided fare, and thus ftir up the divisions negative. which it was its object to appease. The earl of Moira granted, that As the British legislature had given the legislature of Ireland was indeto Ireland the bleflings of a free pendent, but still maintained, that

was

in every matter where the common and pointed out not only the nature interests of both countries of the discontents of the Irish naconcerned, the British legislature tion, but the kind of measures had a right to interfere. He ad- which ought to be resorted to for mitted, also, the advantages whịch semoving them. Ireland had enjoyed, under the The marquis of Lansdowne said, auspicious reign of his present ma. that, if the present was a subject jesty. But why should it be for- of delicacy, ministers were the gotten, that, notwithstanding all the cause of it. There was nobody generous liberality which the Irish less inclined to question, or to inq had experienced from their fove- fringe upon, the independence of reign, there was still a part of the the Irish legislature than he was; boon unbestowed? Was the house but there was a gseat difference to be informed that the catholics of between infringing upon that indeIreland infifted on their right of pendence and acting in their capa- . being elected members of the le- city, as the great hereditary council giflature, on the ground, that, if of the king The doctrine, which they had some of their body in ministers had held forth, he was inparliament, the persecuțions which clined to think, was much more have existed would not have taken calculated to foment jealousies beplace? But here, perhaps, it would tween the two legislatures than the be faid, that he was speaking of motion of the noble lord, were it persecutions as vaguely as he had carried into effect. The lord-lieudone of discontents; and that the tenant of Ireland, as a minister, was one had as little foundation as the accountable to the British as wel! other. He knew, however, - no as to the Irish parliament; and, fewer than ninety-one house-holders therefore, they had a right to watch who had been baniihed from one of over the measures of his administrahis own estates, after being plunder- tion, and to censure or advise him ed of their property, and some of as they might deem proper. The them wounded in their persons. poble secretary had entered into a of the existence of discontents he pompous and elaborate display of enumerated many proofs of the fame the advantages which Ireland had kind with those that had been stated enjoyed under the reign of the preby the earl Fitzwilliam.

sent king. But he would aik him, The earl of Guildford could not whether the immunities which had admit that ministers had thewn any been granted to Ireland had not attention to the interests of Ireland, been fully justified by the confefince the recal of the earl Fitz- quences; and that, too, after they william. If the advice proposed had been refused by their own legifwas not necessary to the king, of latịre ? It was in the recollection of whose paternal care for his people almost every noble lord, that, when he entertained no doubt, it was a petition was presented to the Irish highly requisite to his minifters. parliament, by a numerous and reThe earl Spencer was of opinor, pecable body of that kingdom, the

( that, if lord Moira meant to do any prayer of it was rejected, with somesubstantial good by his motion, he thing little short of indignation; but pught to have gone much farther, . when deputies were sent over to Vol. XXXIX

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