Billeder på siden
PDF
ePub

ages.

their victories, than the glory of The clergy in the pope's dominions delivering nations from tyranny, engrossed all the authority, and the

These ideas had spread far and other countries were in the hands of wide among the Italians, together foreigners. Hence the national with the hope of seeing their coun- spirit of the natives was extinct, try re-attain its independence and and they felt no interest in the ancient splendour. The remem- transactions of their rulers, looking brance of those celebrated names, upon themselves, as wholly unconthat had done it so much credit of cerned either in the good or the old, was now recalled with en- ill success of their measures. thusiasm. Peculiar honours were While Buonaparte was putting paid to the spot where Virgil was the last hand to the settlement of born. A monument was erected to differences with the court of Rome, his memory, and similar memorials and of the affairs of the newly conwere intended to perpetuate the ftituted republies, the councils of fame of other illustrious men, who the Imperial court, were no less had adorned their country either busily occupied in preparing the in former times, or in modern means of disputing, once more, the

empire of Italy, with this fortunate Numerous were the effusions and commander. The point, that seemed teftimonials of their gratitude to the chiefly in contemplation, was whom French, for reviving their expecta- to appoint fucceflor to those genetions to recover those free govern- rals, whom he had successively dements, under which some of the feated. Several were proposed; Italian states had once made so and in truth, the Austrian armies flourishing a figure. While the re- were not deficient in officers of expublican army was advancing to-perience and reputation ; but the wards Rome, some of its many general voice seemed to pronounce well-wishers in that city had al- in favour of the archduke Charles. ready reared in their determinations His conduct and fuccesses, during a statue to its commander, with an the last campaign, had made him inscription to commemorate the re- very confpicuous, and his closing it ftitution of the senate and people with the taking of Kehl, and by to their priinitive power and dig- compelling the French to retire nity.

within their own limits, had raised At Faenza, the inhabitants ac- him a great name in all Germany. tually erected a triumphal arch to These circumstances determined the the honour of the French, and of Imperial miniftry to fix upon this Buonaparte, specifying their victory young prince as the fittest rival to over the papal army, and securing oppofe to Buonaparte. thereby the liberty of that city. In order to fend him to the field The fact was, that the governments with all the advantages that could exercised over the differeat people be procured, every exertion was of Italy, in the ecclesiastical state made throughout the Austrian doespecially, were fallen fo low in minions, to furnish him with an the estimation of the public, that a army fit to revive the hopes of his large proportion of the inhabitants family and his country, both which, were heartily desirous of a change. righely confidered the efforts that

[ C 4 )

were

were making for another trial of before he had received a farther adfortune, to be the last that could dition to the ftrength already are possibly be made. Full of this per- rived. To this intent they advanced suasion, a most formidable army was to the Piava, in three divisions. The again collected, from the numerous first commanded by Massena, effectdivisions and garrisons in the Auf- ed its passage over, near Feltri, on trian service. Their patriotisin and the tenth of March, and compel, honour were equally excited by led the Austrians to withdraw to every motive that could stimulaté Belluno, higher up that river. The either. To do the Austrians justice, second division, under Serrurier, they had displayed enough of both proceeded to Asola, in the neighto preserve their character unsul- bourhood of which, he also crolled lied. But the extremity to which on the twelfth, after putting to the their sovereign and their country rout a body of Austrians that opwas now reduced evidently called posed him. Several other corps were for greater exertions than ever. encamped near this one: but they

The archduke Charles, though did not venture to support it, and a prince of high spirit, and of an they all made a precipitate retreat, enterprising disposition, was not in apprehenfion of being furrounded, by the public reputed an adequate and cut off by the two divifions that match for Buonaparte. This latter, had already crossed, and by another had raised himself entirely by his that was then crolling the river. talents and merit; but the former It was headed by general Guiaux, owed what he was evidently to his who advanced that very evening to royal birth. No expectations were Conagliono, and, on the next day, formed, by those who attended to the thirteenth, to Sacali, where he their respective characters, that he overtook the rear guard of a large would be able to cope with the division of the Auftrians, and made abilities of the French general. a number of prisoners. Massena,

The Austrians had been so com- after taking poflession of Balluno, pletely defeated, at the battle of pursued the enemy that was retreatRivoli, that they had ever since ing to Cadora, and took some hunbeen averse to take the field against dreds. On the sixteenth, all the the French. They were cautiously French divisions directed their posted on the northern fide of the march to the Tagliomento. The Piava, waiting for the reinforce- Austrians were intrenched on the ments of which the Archduke's opposite side, in hope of being army was chiefly to confft. The more successful, in defending the French, on the south of that river, passage of this river, than of the and of the Lavisio, were watch: Piava. The archduke commanded ful of their motions, constantly re- them in person, and was duly senpelling them whenever they al. lible of the necesity of stopping the tempted to crofs either. Part of progress of the French, and thai, by February and of March were con- paffing this river, they would be fumed in hostilities of this nature. able to over-run a large extent of

As soon as the archduke had af- country. This action, which both fumed the command, the French he and Buonaparte considered as determined to march against him, decisive, began at mid-day, The

French

The re

French were by this time arrived on with difficulty, that he effected his the banks of the river, and the pal- own escape. {age was immediately commenced. The passages of the Piava, and Their right and left, protected by of the Tagliamento, decided the a formidable artillery, were directed contest between the archduke and by Buonaparte, to cross the river, Buonaparte. The whole country. and to attack the enemy in Aank, to the north of these rivers now while the centre made its passage lay open to the French. in their front. His orders were ex- publican army spread itself immeecuted with the completest success. diately into every direction, the Both the cavalry and infantry of the Imperial troops retiring before them -Austrians were drawn up with the with a visibly diminished resistance, utmost skill, and behaved with fo Thele evacuated Palmanova, of much firmness, in their respective which the French took pofleffion, positions, as for a while to balance on the eighteenth, with immense the fortune of the day : but the pas magazines of provisions. They adfage being at length effected eve vanced on the nineteenth to Grawhere, and the repeated charges of disca, a town of importance on the the Austrians having failed to make river Lizonzo. The Austrians were that impression upon the French, posted in force on the opposite which was hoped, from the bravery bank: but the French having efof the soldiers, and the judgement fected a passage, made themselves of those who conducted them, it masters of the heights commandwas found necesary to have re- ing the town, upon which it was course to a retreat. The principal obliged to surrender, and the garlofs, in this affair, fell upon the rison, consisting of the best troops officers of the Imperialists: one of in the archduke's army, were made their generals was nain, and several prisoners of war, to the amount of officers of rank were made prisoners, thrzé thousand. Another French with some hundreds of men, besides division proceeding northward from those that were sain.

the Tagliamento, drove the retreatThe defeat of the Austrians was ing enemy as far as Ponteba, after chiefly owing to the superiority of repeatedly defeating him, and mathe French artillery. It ftruck them king numbers prisoners, with vast with such terror, that, after quitting quantities of stores. the field of battle, they could not The capture of Gradisca was be prevailed on to make a stand. . followed by that of Goritz, on the The archduke had taken an ad- twenty-first of March. The Ausvantageous poft at a village, where trians withdrew from this place in he proposed to maintain his ground, fuch hafte, that they left fifteen and risk another combat, the next hundred fick and wounded in the morning; but the discouragement of hospitals, with all their provisions his men, and the impetuosity with and stores. Both these towns be. which it was assailed by the French, longing to the emperor, the French notwithstanding a dark and tempeftu- commander fettled a municipal goous night, compelled him to abandon vernment in them, on the republic his design. The Austrians were can form, declaring them in poslefdriven from their post, and it was fion of all the rights and přivileges

they

H

ANNUAL REGISTER, 1797. were making for another trial of before he had received a farther adfortune, to be the last that could dition to the strength already ars possibly be made. Full of this per- rived. To this intent they advanced suasion, a most formidable army was to the Piava, in three divisions. The again collected, from the numerous first commanded by Massena, effectdivisions and garrisons in the Auf- ed its passage over, near Feltri, on trian service. Their patriotisin and the tenth of March, and compel, honour were equally excited by led the Austrians to withdraw to every motive that could stimulate Belluno, higher up that river. The either. To do the Austrians justice, second division, under Serrurier, they had displayed enough of both proceeded to Asola, in the neighto preserve their character unful- bourhood of which, he also crolled lied. But the extremity to which on the twelfth, after putting to the their sovereign and their country rout a body of Austrians that opwas now reduced evidently called posed him. Several other corps were for greater exertions than ever. encamped near this one: but they

The archduke Charles, though did not venture to support it, and a prince of high spirit, and of an they all made a precipitate retreat, enterprising disposition, was 'not in apprehension of being furrounded, by the public reputed an adequate and cut off by the two divifions that match for Buonaparte. This latter, had already crossed, and by another had raised himself entirely by his that was then crolling the river. talents and merit; but the former It was beaded by general Guiaux, owed what he was evidently to his who advanced that very evening to royal birth. No expectations were Conagliono, and, on the next day, formed, by those who attended to the thirteenth, to Sacali, where he their respective characters, that he overtook the rear guard of a large would be able to cope with the division of the Auftrians, and made abilities of the French general. a number of prisoners. Maslena,

The Austrians had been so com- after taking posession of Balluno, pletely defeated, at the battle of pursued the enemy that was retreatRivoli, that they had ever since ing to Cadora, and took some hun. been averse to take the field against dreds. On the fixteenth, all the the French. They were cautiously French divifions directed their posted on the northern fide of the march to the Tagliomento. The Piava, waiting for the reinforce. Austrians were intrenched on the ments of which the Archduke's opposite fide, in hope of being army was chiefly to conkft. The more successful, in defending the French, on the south of that river, passage of this rives, than of the and of the Lavisio, were watch Piava. The archduke commanded fül of their motions, constantly re- them in person, and was duly senpelling them whenever they at- sible of the necessity of Stopping the tempted to cross either. Part of progress of the French, and that, by February and of March were con- passing this river, they would be Sumed in hostilities of this nature. able to over-run a large extent of

As soon as the archduke had as country. This action, which both fumed the command, the French he and Buonaparte considered as determined to march against him, decisive, began at mid-day, The

French

French were by this time arrived on with difficulty, that he eflected his the banks of the river, and the pas- own escape. lage was immediately commenced. The passages of the Piava, and Their right and left, protected by of the Tagliamento, decided the a formidable artillery, were directed contest between the archduke and by Buonaparte, to cross the river, Buonaparte. The whole country, and to attack the enemy in fank, to the north of these rivers now while the centre made its passage lay open to the French. The rein their front. His orders were ex- publican army spread itself immeecuted with the completest success. diately into every direction, the Both the cavalry and infantry of the Imperial troops retiring before them -Auftrians were drawn up with the with a visibly diminished resistance. utmost skill, and behaved with fo Thele evacuated Palmanova, of much firmness, in their respective which the French took poffeffion, positions, as for a while to balance on the eighteenth, with immense the fortune of the day : but the pal- magazines of provisions. They adsage being at length effected every vanced on the nineteenth to Grawhere, and the repeated charges of disca, a town of importance on the the Austrians having failed to make river Lizonzo. The Austrians were that impression upon the French, posted in force on the opposite which was hoped, from the bravery bank: but the French having efof the soldiers, and the judgement fećted a passage, made themselves of those who conducted them, it masters of the heights commandwas found necessary to have re- ing the town, upon which it was course to a retreat. The principal obliged to surrender, and the garlofs, in this affair, fell upon the rifon, consisting of the best troops officers of the Imperialists: one of in the archduke's army, were made their generals was sain, and several prisoners of war, to the amount of officers of rank were made prisoners, three thousand. Another French with some hundreds of men, besides divisiow proceeding northward from those that were slain.

the Tagliamento, drove the retreatThe defeat of the Austrians was ing enemy as far as Ponteba, after chiefly owing to the superiority of repeatedly defeating him, and mathe French artillery. It ftruck them king numbers prisoners, with vast with such terror, that, after quitting quantities of stores. the field of battle, they could not The capture of Gradisca was be prevailed on to make a stand. . followed by that of Goritz, on the The archduke hack taken an ad- twenty-firft of March. The Aus. vantageous poft at a village, where trians withdrew from this place in he proposed to maintain his ground, such haste, that they left fifteen and risk another combat, the next hundred fick and wounded in the morning; but the discouragement of hospitals, with all their provisions his men, and the impetuosity with and stores. Both these towns bewhich it was assailed by the French, longing to the emperor, the French notwithstanding a dark and tempeftu- commander fettled a municipal goous night, compelled him to abandon vernment in them, on the republihis design. The Austrians were can form, declaring them in pofiel driven from their poft, and it was fion of all the rights and privileges

« ForrigeFortsæt »