The Last Inca; Or, The Story of Tupac Amâru

Forsideomslag
Tinsley brothers, 1874 - 859 sider
 

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Populære passager

Side 265 - Little remains: but every hour is saved From that eternal silence, something more, A bringer of new things; and vile it were For some three suns to store and hoard myself, And this gray spirit yearning in desire To follow knowledge like a sinking star, Beyond the utmost bound of human thought.
Side 245 - Dickens capacity for good or evil, for love or hatred, for patriotism or discontent, for the decomposition of virtue into vice, or the reverse, at any single moment in the soul of one of these its quiet servants, with the composed faces and the regulated actions.
Side 130 - With rapid repetition. In the name Of God ! for Spain and vengeance ! and forthwith On either side along the whole defile The Asturians, shouting in the name of God, Set the whole ruin loose ! huge trunks and stones, And loosen'd crags, down, down they roll'd, with rush, And bound, and thundering force.
Side 211 - ... without a fever or other bad circumstance attending. And the disease, by being communicated from the sick to the well, seemed daily to get ahead, and to rage the more, as fire will do by laying on fresh combustibles. Nor was it given by conversing with only, or coming near the sick, but even by touching their clothes, or anything that they had before touched.
Side 245 - ... beheld the Indian labouring at the mine under cruel buffetings, his family neglected, perishing, or enslaved; she would have marked him on his return, after eight months of dire toil, enter a place which knew him not, or a household that could only sorrow over the gaunt creature who had returned to them, and mingle their sorrows with his ; or, still more sad, she would have seen Indians who had been brought from far distant homes, linger at the mines, too hopeless or too careless to return."3...
Side 38 - Calize arrived with upwards of 4000 slaves. ... It was really a most distressing thing to see the way in which these wretched creatures naked, tired, and lame were treated [by the Spaniards]; exhausted with hunger, sick, and despairing. The unfortunate mothers, with two or three children on their shoulders or clinging round their necks, overwhelmed with tears and grief, all tied with cords or with iron chains. . . . Nor was there a girl but had been violated by the depredators...
Side 211 - To the cure of this malady, neither medical knowledge, nor the power of drugs, was of any effect...
Side 38 - ... journey. And when some of them could not walk, the Spaniards, to prevent their remaining behind to make war, killed them by burying their swords in their sides or their breasts. It was really a most distressing thing to see the way in which these wretched creatures, naked, tired, and lame, were treated ; exhausted with hunger, sick, and despairing. The unfortunate mothers, with two and three children on their shoulders or clinging round their necks, overwhelmed with tears and grief...
Side 211 - ... was to avoid it : persuaded, therefore, of this, and taking care for themselves only, men and women in great numbers left the city, their houses, relations, and effects, and fled into the country : as if the wrath of God had been restrained to visit those only within the walls of the city ; or else concluding that none ought to stay in a place thus doomed to destruction.
Side 58 - Bloody and deceitful men shall not live out half their days (Ps.

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