Mononia: A Love Story of 'Forty-eight

Forsideomslag
Chatto and Windus, 1901 - 383 sider
 

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Side 359 - Like one who wraps the drapery of his couch Around him, and lies down to pleasant dreams.
Side 169 - Oh ! then remember me. Other arms may press thee, Dearer friends caress thee, All the joys that bless thee Sweeter far may be; But when friends are nearest, And when joys are dearest, Oh ! then remember me.
Side 397 - Giaslng, and as such some day he will have to be taken into account."— Boston Herald. " It should Insure Mr. White a permanent place in the critical regard of his fellow-countrymen... . Few characters as strong as that of Elizabeth Hinckley have ever been drawn by an American author, and she will remain in the mind of the most assiduous novel reader, secure of a place far above that held by most of the puny creations of the day."— Chicago Tribune.
Side 396 - Dostoievsky, and yet it is in no sense an imitation of those writers: it is apparently like them merely because the author's motives and ways of thought and observation are like them. ... I have never before read any such treatment in the English language of the life and thought of laboring people.
Side 339 - Oh for a tongue to curse the slave, Whose treason, like a deadly blight, Comes o'er the councils of the brave, And blasts them in their hour of might...
Side 396 - There is no end of philosophy in books about the poor and how to reach them and send rays of sunshine into their world; but few books get at the real 'Differences' that exist between the wealthy classes and the poor as does Mr. Hervey White. . . . Difference* is vitally interesting, both as a story and as a moral lesson. ... It is written with wholesome enthusiasm and an intelligent survey of real facts."— Boston Herald. " The method employed by Mr. Hervey White in Difference! is not like that...
Side 396 - WHITE. 121110, cloth, decorative, 320 pages. $1.50 " It is treating the poor as a class and employing any method of handling them that I object to. ... Why can't they be treated as individuals, the same as other people ? What would the rich think of my impertinence if I went about the world treating them in a peculiar manner,— as if they were not real people, at all, but only 'the rich,' in my knowledge?"— Hester Carr, in Differences.
Side 397 - American author, and she will remain in the mind of the most assiduous novel reader, secure of a place far above that held by most of the puny creations of the day."— Chicago Tribune. " It is wrought of enduring qualities. Few novels are so sustained on an elevated plane of interest."— Philadelphia Item. " It is a novel that takes hold of one, and is not the sort of book that, once begun, can be laid down without being finished."—Indianapolis Newt.

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