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necessity for any argument on the subject. It needs only a little common sense trial to prove it correct. I have cured chills with cream of tartar and sulphur, which leads me to think that the sulphur or chlorine in the quinine may be a valuable thing. Anyone who will compare the "New Idea" with the formula given on page 628, i. e., use that formula himself, will turn with holy horror from it. Dr. W. E. Pugh (formerly of our parish) used to call it "Devil's Broth." I will wager if the two Doctors themselves had chills they would not take many doses of their own medicine.

Also, when cured with the "New Idea," the chills do not return in seven, fourteen or twenty-eight days. There are no more chills that season. An old Doctor in Anna, O., writes me he "cures chronic third-day chills with nitric acid," and they do not come back.

Also, the acid tonic is a purely chemical compound, does not separate by adding water, as does tincture of muriate of iron. Does not injure the teeth. Five drops to a glass of water makes a good tooth wash. No need to take it through a quill or straw. Also, the dose is not excessive, United States Dispensatory to the contrary, notwithstanding. As in nearly thirty years use of it, in the prescribed dose as above, I have yet to see the first untoward symptom. Can the same be said of quinine? I have seen a very few (five or six cases) where it did not agree well with the stomach in the full dose; but half the amount (five drops to glass of warm water) was well received, and did good service. Also, in the place of the nauseating, distressing drug, quinine, given between times with really no assurance that it will do what is wanted, you have a pleasant drink, grateful to the patient and palate, with the absolute certainty that your patient will have no return of the chill. Also, you will never have any hematuria. In eight years I have not had a single case where the "New Idea" was used.

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Allow me to draw the attention of the reader to the splendid action of the bichloride of mercury in malaria. I have been surprised, after having given the second and third course of calomel and

podophyllin, and followed it with the bichloride to note the amount of black, tarry, stinking mess that was thrown off from the intestines. Can any of my brethren tell me where the quart or so of filth comes from? Surely the drug must get behind the "way back” filth and start it moving. Also, I have noted that after its action the patient fattens up right along, with good color in face, fine appetite, and more cheerful.

The acid tonic should be given after the calomel or bichloride has acted, and stopped during their administration.

[Written for the MEDICAL BRIEF.J Mind-Reading.

BY W. S. ROBINSON, M. D., Frostville, Ark.

I notice, in Dr. Robert Hunter Dalton's very able article, "Lucubration of an Inquisitive Mind," in March BRIEF, where he states that: "Mind-reading is now established as practical beyond question. The matter has been finally settled by the finding of articles by a mind-reader, hidden by a person whose hand is afterwards held by him, as they walk, or drive, in search of the article hidden, the mind reader being perfectly blindfolded." He further states, "it appears to be an insolvable mystery, and few men venture to account for it." I, for one, will venture to put the Doctor on to the "combination,” as I have done the "trick" a hundred times just for amusement. There is no such thing as "mind-reading." It is a "fake" of the "first water." It is "muscle-reading." The person's hand which you hold to, dictates to you the exact route, and where to stop without his knowledge (if he is not on to your "combination"). His hand is active, and yours passive. Try the "trick," Doctor, and if you do not find the pen-knife the first trial, I will set up the frog legs.

Success to the BRIEF.

Menorrhagia.

Dr. Geo. M. O'Hara, West Side Square, Springfield, Ill., says: I prescribe Aletris Cordial for profuse and painful menstruation, with very gratifying results.

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WM. R. WARNER & CO.'S

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1-2 gr.

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MORPHINE AND ATROPINE, No. 16,

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Inquiry Department.

How Will It Terminate?

I was called to see Mrs. B., on February 21st, 1898, supposed to be in labor. Upon careful examination, coupled with a history of the case from patient, I told her, in my opinion, she would not be confined before the following day or night.

Patient is the mother of six children, two being born dead. I was very certain, after my examination, that it was a twin pregnancy, and so informed patient. The uterus was pressing forcibly against the sternum, causing shortness of breath, and considerable pain. The abdomen was greatly distended, very much resembling dropsy, feet unusually swollen, pressure against bladder causing urine to be voided often, bowels constipated. I ordered nurse to give large dose of castor oil at bedtime, and send messenger for me on first indication of labor. I left at four P. M.

At eleven A. M. the next day, while patient was sitting quietly upon the bedside, the membranes ruptured, and from her statement, "almost a bucketful passed," and immediately the heavy uterus sank downward into the pelvis. I was notified, and reached patient about two P. M., but, before I arrived, she was delivered of a male child. Body, upper and lower extremities well developed, but the head and face presenting all the likeness of a cat. The child survived only a few seconds after birth. (Patient claims to have received a severe shock during the middle of gestation, being very badly frightened by a mad cat.)

After the child's exit, the midwife in attendance tied and severed the cord, and placed patient in bed to await my coming. I arrived about two hours after birth of child, and at once made an examination, and could, in my opinion, outline another fetus in uterus. I began immediately to bring away the presenting placenta. Mind you, since the birth of other child, she had not experienced a single pain of any nature. Kneading the abdomen with left hand, while using gentle traction on the cord

with right, the placenta was expressed in very few minutes.

Well, so far so good. My next step consisted in giving my patient fifteen drops fluid extract ergot, together with all the mechanical methods in my knowledge to induce uterine activity, but all in vain. The organ remained soft only when deep pressure was made, reaching the substance within. The uterus would drift from right side to left, from pelvis to sternum. This brings us to the hour of five P. M. Patient resting unusually well. No pain, either in labor or after. No indication of hemorrhage; pulse and temperature good. Called for something to eat, which was prepared. I thought it was policy at this point to allow her a few hours she could call her own, giving me an opportunity to hold a secret commune with my own thoughts, and determine the future course to pursue.

After a rest of four hours, I began giving her, at stated intervals, usual doses of the most reliable drugs known to bring about uterine activity. I did not neglect to bring into play all the old women tea remedies. Along this line I again battled, in vain, the remainder of the night, and, in face of all, my patient would now and then drop into a gentle sleep, only to awake fresh and free from pain. Sunrise found me in the mire, standing guard over my patient in a peculiar condition (in fact, I had never before met a similar case). Several miles from surgical assistance, I felt like help from any source would be like an oasis in the desert. My patient resting well. No threatening hemorrhage. Must I go in and take the lingering substance away, whatever it may be, incurring the dangers that might occur, or would it be best to rest my case in Nature's care for a few days, and watch and await results? After consulting my patient, her husband, and nurse, I decided to allow Nature to take its course for forty-eight hours at least, at which time I promised to see patient again.

Now, I would like to hear from any of my professional brothers, and especially the kind Editor of BRIEF. Did I do right or wrong? If wrong, what ought I to have done? In conclusion, will say (Continued on page 726.)

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“ONLY A LITTLE NERVOUS.” CAN you imagine anything worse than being

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"only a little nervous." Is there any suffering greater than being "only a little nervous." All nervous patients know that there is no unhappiness more terrible than being “only a little nervous. My Dear Doctor, don't call your nervous patient a crank, don't make fun of his malady, but do something for him. There is nothing so good for

"nerves" as CELERINA and exercise, or rather work that causes one to take exercise. Therefore, give your "nervous patients" a teaspoonful of CELERINA every two or three hours and put them to work.

I visited patient; she is doing well, able to sit up, and walk about the house, but the peculiar something is there still. ZACH. A. THOMPSON, M. D.

Melvine, Tenn.

[It is the general concensus of opinion, among obstetricians, that an accoucheur shall not leave his patient until labor is complete-that is, until the uterus is thoroughly emptied of its contents, and well concentrated. While this is a good general rule to follow, we believe that room should be left for the individual judgment to operate in. Circumstances do alter cases, and sometimes patience and a masterly inactivity are the course of wisdom. The Doctor can not consider his case discharged, but must watch her carefully, and be prepared to act at the first unfavorable symptom.ED.]

How to Use Quinine.

In looking over some of my old BRIEFS, I find some advice given to Dr. D. S. Sparks, on page 1852 (December, 1897), in reference to the use of quinine in pernicious chills. You say give twenty to thirty grains hypodermically, at a dose. Will you please inform me what salt you would use not to produce an abscess, or some bad effect following its use? Did you ever use quinine by inunction on a raw surface? Would there be any danger, say, in putting on a good fly blister, and following with the quinine? Would like to have your opinion on this matter, for the time is coming when we will have to use considerable anti-periodics, and, as you know, sometimes the stomach is SO weak that one can take scarcely anything. I have never been able to get a preparation that I could use hypodermically without an abscess forming, and I desire to know the prescription that you use. J. R. BAKER, M. D.

Harrisburg, Ill.

[When abscesses follow the hypodermic use of quinine, it is usually because the drug is not perfectly dissolved, or contains gritty particles, impurities, etc. Or, the technique, or the operator, may be deficient, or, perhaps the patient's tissues are devitalized. Ordinarily, with a perfect solution, a clean, sharp needle and due care, no

bad results will follow. Either the hydrobromate, the muriate, or sulphate may be used. Get Powers & Weightman's quinine. If you use the hydrobromate, dissolve forty-eight grains of the salt in half an ounce of distilled water. If you use the muriate, add twenty-four grains to forty-eight minims of aqua bullientis and heat. If you prefer the ordinary sulphate, add a drop or two of aromatic sulphuric acid to fifteen grains of the quinine, and dissolve in aqua fontaine one and one-half drachms. All these solutions should be injected at bloodheat, and into the subcutaneous loose tissues. If the muscles are entered, trouble is apt to follow. Once the needle penetrates the skin, turn it in several directions, and inject a little at the time, rubbing the seat of puncture gently, to promote absorption.

We see no reason why quinine should not be used on a raw surface, as suggested by you.-ED.]

Malignant Disease-Sepsis. Please give me diagnosis and treatment for the following cases:

Case 1.-Mrs. S., aged forty-eight, married, health good prior to present illness. Menses ceased some three years ago until September, 1896, when they re-appeared. She then consulted me. I prescribed, and they ceased for some time, until January, 1897, when they appeared again. She called upon me once more, and she has been under my care ever since. She has been bedfast since the summer of 1897, and has been failing in strength, weight, and usefulness. She complains of pain in back, bowels, stomach, and side. The flow is easily controlled, appetite good, some soreness in region of uterus, bowels regular, but still the patient is gradually growing weaker.

Case 2.-Mrs. H., aged thirty-five, married, has five children. Health good up till last confinement, in September, 1897, which, I was informed, was normal. I saw the patient in November, the first time. She had a cough and complained of pain in head, breast, side, and back, just below right scapula. Has a rigor, or chill, every day. Some soreness in (Continued on page 728.)

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