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CONTENTS.

PAGE

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329.

Introduction

1. 33

Origin of Sabbath Schools

9

Hints for the formation of Supday Schools

13. 36. 68. 97. 129

Management of Sunday Schools

70. 72 74.79. 347

Notes on the Scriptures

17. 47. 85. 113. 213

First Sunday School in the United States

21. 53. 142

A survey of the Sunday Schools throughout the world

21

Sunday School celebrations

29. 370

S. School Facts and Anecdotes 39. 119. 172. 215. 265. 295. 318. 355. 377

Origin of the British and Foreigo Bible Society

41

Let Infidels read the Bible they oppose

41

On Social Prayer

42

Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church 1823.

46

Society for the relief of poor widows

50

Particulars relative to the late Rev. Richard Raikes

51

On the Existence, Personality and Presence of God

55

Intelligence

59. 297. 329. 361.

New-York Sunday School Societies

60

Poetry

61. 95. 128. 224. 266. 330

On Prayer

65

Observations on Sunday School Churches

75

Want of instruction in Ohio

79

Extract from the Governor of New-York's speech

81

Annual meetings and reports.

Free Schools in the State of New York

82

S. S. Association in New York

88

Auxiliary New-York Bible and Common Prayer Book Society 94

Belfast Sunday School Union

125

Protestant Episcopal Sunday School New-York

181

Female Sunday School Union Society

182

St. George's Church Sunday School Association

188. 195
District of Columbia Sunday School Union

222
Sunday School Union in Rochester New-York

362

Palestine Mission. Letter of Mr. Fisk.

83

Description of Jerusalem

83

Ignorance of the Turkish Government

87

Notices and reviews of new publications.

On Infant Schools

92

Poetical Miscellany

94

Sunday School Tracts

171

Questions on the New Testament

263. 380

Sabbath School Visitant

263

Sunday School Magazine, Philadelphía

264

Rose by Mrs. Sherwood

359

New series of Tracts for children

379

May-bee and the wishing cap

380

Difficulties of Sunday School achers

100
Taking Sunday School Scholars to Church

102
Emulation

105. 168
Rules for Sunday Schools

110
49

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Catechetical Instruction

115. 136. 202. 277. 351. 366

Method of Instructing a class

116

Debates of the Association of Teachers 123. 133. 161. 203. 251. 267.

299. 331.364.

137

On Femalė Sunday Schools

108. 139. 206

Story of Benevolus

Constitution of the Pittsburg Sunday School

143

Self Examination of Teachers

147

Best manner of communicating Instruction

148

Address to Children from four to six

years

old

152

Answer to lota on taking Sunday School children to Church 156

Religious Conversation approved by Cod

168

To Bible Classes

193

Instruction to the conductors of Sunday Schools

;

173

Duty of Self-Denial

177

Dr. Milner's Address

88. 193

Thoughts on early rising

210

The necessity of perspicuity in Sunday School Teachers

211

Improvements in Sunday Schools

218. 255. 324. 328. 358

The uncertainty of Life, an argument for activity in benevolent

pursuits

236

Extract from Langhorne's Theodosius and Constantia

237

Monitory Record

238

Frailty of Children, a motive to diligence

239

The (burch of God established through the teaching of his word 242

Reflections on the Qd chapter of Ephesians

247

The Sunday School Teachers prayer meeting

248. 277

Effect of Sunday School instruction, on the manners and habits of

the children of our city

274

Want of perseverance the cause of decline in Sunday Schools 281

Obituary notice of Thomas Jarman, late Editor of this Magazine 285

The White Book

287. 303. 338. 356

Remarks on Sunday School anniversaries

290

Effect of S S. in correcting the religious prejudices of the age 301

Necessary precautions in receiving Sunday School Scholars 306

An inquiry into the subject of Chalmer's Civic Economy 308. 371

Female Education

310

Duty of committing our concerns to God with prayer

312

On Scripture lessons

313

Selections from the Port Folio of a Sunday School Teacher 315. 353

A pleasing reflection for religious instructors

317

A brief answer to a very common excuse for not doing good

317

Effects of Sunday Schools in adding useful and pious members to

the Church

333

Sunday Schools considered as promoting early piety

343

Sunday Schools in Montreal, Canada

350

Remarks on reading Novek. &c.

354

On the inanner of reading in Sunday Schools

368

A soliloquy from Wesley

378

Address on the close of the work

work

354

Notices to Correspondents

160. 224. 266

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The present age has been emphatically styled “ The age of benevolence.”

It is indeed an age in which a great and mighty influence has descended upon the christian world ; arousing it to more benevolent and extensive exertions for the spread of christianity, than have been made since the first promulgation of the gospel: and wherever this particular influence has been most warmly felt, and energetically acted upon, it has produced, as a secondary result, the most beneficial effects upon the hearts and lives of those who have yielded to it. The sacred impulse to spread the knowledge of the gospel, which is so extensively felt, has produced a union among christians as christians ; and is gradually breaking down the barriers which a narrow spirit of sectarianism had raised to kee from intercourse and communion with each other." They who are united in endeavouring to promote the “ glory of God,” their common Fa.

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ther, “peace on earth, and good will towards men,' cannot but feel a desire to be at peace with each other. They have common objects to attain, and common difficulties to encounter; difficulties so great, that they who are best acquainted with them frequently“ tremble" while they “rejoice;" and would almost faint with despondency, if they were not supported by the divine assurances, that “ the earth shall be full of the knowledge of the Lord as the waters cover the sea ;* and that “ all shall know the Lord from the least unto the greatest.”+

One common object, then, to which the christian mind should be, and is now directed, is the propagation of the “ knowledge of the Lord ;” and among the best methods of doing this, two powerful engines have been employed; and are proceeding with effect :-Bible Societies, and Missionary Societies.

The Scriptures, or some portions of them, are now translated into almost all the languages of the earth ; and in every quarter of the globe there are some of the heralds of the cross to be found preacbing the glad tidings of salvation where they have never been heard before, or reviving an attention to them in places where they have been darkened by superstition, or supplanted by paganism.

Next to the Bible and Missionary Societies, one of the most mighty means for enlightening and evangelizing the world, and one of those means which seems as if designed to usher in the millenial day, is the introduction of Sabbath Schools.

This method of propagating the “knowledge of the Lord" ! has an immense advaag er other means—that it commences its operations at the threshold of human existence, at the right period in the life of man: It sows the good seed, which is to

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* Isaiah, 11. 9.

Hah 2. 14.

# Jer. 31. 34.

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spring up to everlasting life,” in ground not overgrown with tares, or rendered unfruitful by bad culture ; and lays the foun, dation of a widely spreading influence over the succeeding age.

But the introduction of Sabbath Schools, (like the formation of Bible Societies,) is insufficient of itself to accomplish the purpose for which they were designed. As, in, the one case, able and zealous missionaries must be found to preach the gospel to the heathen, so, in the other case, able and zealous persons must be found to teach the gospel to the young and uninstructed. And this too has a powerful re-action, and returns the blessings it dispenses a hạndred fold upon the heads of those who, on right principles, and with right views, engage in the " delightful task.”

There is not a better method for an intelligent mind to become perfectly acquainted with the principles of any science, but partially understood before, than methodically to teach that science to others. Such person feels the necessity

: of fully comprehending himself the true intent and meaning of that which he is to teaches and by teaching, his mind expands, and his principles become fixed and operative. So it is in peligion, fatke most sublime of all sciences,) the frequent reiteration of the same truths, and the act of convincing or endeavouring to conyince others of their value and importance, make them doubly valuable and important to ourselves ; and the necessity of a constant reference to the scriptures when the principles of cha ather than notions of sectarianism are to be taught, brings the teacher to the fountain head of divine knowledge ; and while he instructs others, he is himself instructed and improved.

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