Shakespearean Scholarship: A Guide for Actors and Students

Forsideomslag
Greenwood Publishing Group, 2002 - 413 sider


More has been written about Shakespeare than about any other author, and so much new scholarship continues to be generated that even experts are daunted. While bibliographies of Shakespeare scholarship exist, these tend to cover works that are primarily of academic interest. At the same time, there are many scholarly works of inestimable value to theatre professionals. These works can help actors and directors gain a better understanding of Shakespeare's plays, his world, and the ways in which theatre companies have interpreted his works. But because of the sheer bulk of Shakespeare scholarship, it is difficult for theatre professionals to distinguish such materials from more arcane studies.

This reference is a convenient guide to the many scholarly works on Shakespeare that are of special interest to members of the dramatic community. The volume begins with a consideration of how the needs of theatre professionals differ from those of scholars. It then offers advice on how to use the resources of academic libraries. Topics such as the merits of particular editions and commentaries, available reference resources, graphic works and studies of the Elizabethan world, and the ways in which Shakespeare's plays have been staged are also discussed.

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Shakespearean scholarship: a guide for actors and students

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The goal of this trio of books by O'Dell (theater and English, Wilfrid Laurier Univ.), the text consultant for the Stratford Festival, is to help actors and students gain access to Shakespeare's plays ... Læs hele anmeldelsen

Udvalgte sider

Indhold

Shakespearean Scholarship without Tears
1
Premises
2
The Authors Biases
3
An Actors Guide to Shakespearean Scholarship
14
Theatrical Adventures in an Academic Library
17
Diggers and Delvers Gleaners and Grooms
29
The Actors Responsibilities
35
Which Shakespeare?
37
Villains Rogues and Notorious Failures
221
Shakespeare the Master of All Arts
228
Shakespeares England
233
Apocrypha
238
General Introduction
239
Encyclopedias of Ordinary Life
251
A Womans Work
252
Love Marriage and Procreation
253

The Scholarly Editions
39
Nonscholarly Editions
49
Alternative Strategies
50
What Can Be Learned from Quartos and Folios?
52
In Search of Shakespeares Text
61
Playspecific Commentaries
62
The Actor and the Text
68
Recommended Reading
69
Dictionaries Reference Books and Guides
73
Reference Books Companions and Guides
92
History Reference Books
100
Nonacademic Introductions and Overviews
102
A Debt of Gratitude
103
Recommended Reading
104
Pictures Reproductions and Reprints
109
Picturefilled General Introductions
111
Castles and Sheepcotes
112
Portraits and Landscapes
113
Engravings and Woodblocks
114
Emblems
115
Shakespeares Hand
123
Shakespeares Library
133
Verbal and Visual Portraits of Daily Life
150
Old Books Anew
153
The Shakespeare Industry
157
Famous Players of the World Stage
161
Reflections in a Mirror
162
The Glass of Fashion
164
Using the Past to Reflect the Present
176
Distorted Images of the Past
193
Recommended Reading
194
The Peopled World
197
Honorable Service
199
Occupations
203
The Aristocracy
215
Fools
220
Private Matters
255
Games and Pastimes
259
Sports
263
Holidays
267
The Natural World
271
Travel
274
Commerce
275
Anachronisms
276
Theatrical Time Machines
280
Recommended Reading
284
Beliefs
291
Intellectual History
292
Shakespeares Personality
293
The English Church
297
Death
310
The Supernatural
312
Prejudices
321
Misogyny
323
Layers of Meaning
325
Recommended Reading
326
Shakespeare in the Theatre
331
Production History
333
Performance Criticism
336
Shakespeare in Performance
337
Acting Shakespeare
347
Shakespeares First Theatres
355
The Swan of Avon
363
The Medieval Heritage
371
Recommended Reading
372
Final Thoughtsfor Now
377
Shakespeare in the Rehearsal Hall
379
Works Cited
385
General Index
391
Index of Plays and Characters
409
Copyright

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Populære passager

Side 163 - The heavens themselves, the planets, and this centre, Observe degree, priority, and place, Insisture, course, proportion, season, form, Office, and custom, in all line of order...
Side 161 - O, for a muse of fire, that would ascend The brightest heaven of invention ! A kingdom for a stage, princes to act, And monarchs to behold the swelling scene...
Side 309 - Still through the hawthorn blows the cold wind: Says suum, mun, ha, no, nonny. Dolphin my boy, my boy, sessa! let him trot by. Storm still LEAR. Why, thou wert better in thy grave than to answer with thy uncovered body this extremity of the skies. Is man no more than this? Consider him well. Thou owest the worm no silk, the beast no hide, the sheep no wool, the cat no perfume. Ha! here's three on "s are sophisticated! Thou art the thing itself; unaccommodated man is no more but such a poor, bare,...
Side 175 - They say he is already in the forest of Arden, and a many merry men with him ; and there they live like the old Robin Hood of England. They say many young gentlemen flock to him every day, and fleet the time carelessly, as they did in the golden world.
Side 317 - twixt the green sea and the azur'd vault Set roaring war; to the dread rattling thunder Have I given fire and rifted Jove's stout oak With his own bolt, the strong-bas'd promontory Have I made shake and by the spurs pluck'd up The pine and cedar; graves at my command Have wak'd their sleepers, op'd and let 'em forth By my so potent Art.
Side 295 - When that this body did contain a spirit, A kingdom for it was too small a bound; But now two paces of the vilest earth Is room enough.
Side 8 - Be not too tame neither, but let your own discretion be your tutor: suit the action to the word, the word to the action; with this special observance, that you o'erstep not the modesty of nature: for any thing so overdone is from the purpose of playing, whose end both at the first and now, was and is, to hold as 'twere the mirror up to nature; to show virtue her own feature, scorn her own image, and the very age and body of the time his form and pressure.
Side 104 - Seek for thy noble father in the dust : Thou know'st 'tis common ; all that lives must die, Passing through nature to eternity. Ham. Ay, madam, it is common. Queen. If it be, Why seems it so particular with thee ? Ham. Seems, madam ! nay, it is ; I know not

Om forfatteren (2002)

LESLIE O'DELL is Associate Professor of Theatre and English at Wilfrid Laurier University and Text Consultant for the Stratford Festival in Ontario.

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