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" It appears, from the books of the Treasurer, that the sums received from students in the Law School, during the sixteen years of his professorship, amounted to $105,000. Of this sum, only $47,200 were spent in salaries, and other current expenses of the School. The balance, amounting to $57,200, is represented by the following items, viz.:

Books purchased for the Library and for students, including about

$1,950 for binding, and deducting the amount received for books sold

$29,000 For the enlargement of the Hall, containing the library and lecturerooms, in 1844 - 45

12,700 The Fund remaining to the credit of the School in August, 1845

15,500

$57,200

Thus it appears that the Law School, at the time of Professor Story's death, actually possessed, independent of the somewhat scanty donations of Mr. Royall and Mr. Dane, funds and other property, including a large library, and a commodious edifice, amounting to upwards of fifty-seven thousand dollars, all of which had been earned during Professor Story's term of service. As he declined, during all this time, to receive a larger annual salary than $1,000, and as his high character and the attraction of his name doubtless contributed to swell the income of the School, it will be evident that a considerable portion of this large sum may justly be regarded as the fruit of his bountiful labors contributed to the University

“ The committee, while calling attention to the extent of the pecuniary benefaction which the Law School has received from Professor Story, have felt it their duty to urge upon the Government of the University the propriety of recog. mizing this service in some suitable form. The name of Royall, attached to one of the professorships, keeps alive the memory of his early beneficence. The name of Dane, attached to the professorship on which Story taught, and sometimes to the edifice, containing the library and lecture-rooms, and also to the Law School itself, attests, with triple academic voice, a well-rewarded donation. But the contributions of Royall and Dane combined -- important as they have been, and justly worthy of honorable mention- do not equal what has been contributed by Story. At the present moment, Story must be regarded as the largest pecuniary benefactor of the Law School, and one of the largest pecuniary benefactors of the University. In this respect he stands before Hollis, Alford, Boylston, Hersey, Bowdoin, Erving, Eliot, Smith, M'Lean, Perkins, and Fisher. His contributions have this additional peculiarity, that they were munificently afforded, - from his daily earnings, — not after death, but during his own life; so that he became, as it were, the executor of his own will. In justice to the dead, as an example to the living, and in conformity with established usage, the University should enroll his name among its founders, and, in some fit manner, inscribe it upon the School which he has helped to rear.

“ Three different courses have occurred to the committee. The edifice containing the library and lecture-rooms may be called after him, Story Hall. Or the branch of the University devoted to law may be called the Story Law School; as the other branch of the University devoted to science is called, in gratitude to a distinguished benefactor, Lawrence Scientific School. Or, still further, a new and permanent professorship in the Law School may be created, bearing his name.

“ If the latter suggestion should find acceptance, the committee would recommend that the professorship be of Commercial Law and the Law of Nations. It is well known, that it was the earnest desire of Professor Story, often expressed, in view of the increasing means of the Law School, and of the necessity of meeting the increasing demands for education in the law, that professorships of both these branches should be established. He regarded that of commercial law as most needed. His own preëminence in this department is shown in his works, and especially in his numerous judicial opinions. And only a few days before his death, in conver

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sation with one of this committee, hearing that it had been proposed by some of the merchants of Boston, on his resignation of the seat which he had held on the Bench for thirtyfour years, to cause his statue in marble to be erected, he said,

If the merchants of Boston wish to do me honor in any way on my leaving the Bench, let it not be by a statue, but by founding in the Law School a professorship of commercial law. With these generous words he embraced in his vows at once his favorite law, and his favorite University.

“ The subject of commercial law is of great and growing practical importance. Every new tie of commerce, in the multiplying relations of mankind, gives new occasion for its application. Besides the general principles of the law of Contracts, it comprehends the law of Bailments, Agency, Partnership, Bills of Exchange, and Promissory Notes, Shipping and Insurance ;-branches of inexpressible interest to the lawyer, the merchant, and, indeed, to every citizen. The main features of this law are common to all commercial nations: they are recognized with substantial uniformity, whether at Boston, London, or Calcutta; at Hamburg, Marseilles, or Leghorn. In this respect they may be regarded as a part of the private law of nations. They would be associated naturally with the Public Law of Nations; embracing, of course, the Law of Admiralty, and that other branch which, it is hoped, will remain for ever, a dead letter, - the Law of Prize.

“ The committee believe that all who hear this statement will agree, that something ought to be done to commemorate the obligation of the University to one of its most eminent professors and largest pecuniary benefactors. They have ventured to make suggestions with regard to the manner in which this may be accomplished, not with any pertinacious confidence in their own views, but simply as a mode of opening the subject, and bringing it to your best attention. In dwelling on the propriety of creating a new and permanent professorship, they do not wish to be understood as expressing a preference for this form of acknowledgment. It may well be a question, whether the services of Professor Story, -important in every respect, — shedding upon the Law School a lasting fame, and securing to it pecuniary competence, an extensive library, and a commodious hall,- can be comme. morated with more appropriate academic honors, than by giving his name to that department of the University of which he has been the truest founder.' The world, in ad. vance of any formal action of the University, has already placed the Law School in the illumination of his name. It is by the name of Story that this seat of legal education has become known wherever jurisprudence is cultivated as a science. By his name it has been crowned abroad."

In furtherance of the wish expressed by my father, that the merchants, if they desired to honor his name, instead of erecting his statue, would found a Professorship of Commercial Law in the Law School, a project was at once put on foot to establish such a Professorship, to which my father's name should be given, and which he should assume in place of the position then occupied by him. This scheme was so far matured as to leave little doubt that it would be carried into effect, so soon as his retirement from the Bench should leave him free. Nothing could have been more grateful in every respect than this project, whether he considered it as a tribute of honorable respect for his judicial services, from a class of men so truly esteemed by him, or as affording him a position, the duties of which were of all things most agreeable to his feelings.

CHAPTER XIV.

PROFESSORIAL AND JUDICIAL LIFE.

FESTIVAL ON THE ENLARGEMENT OF THE NEW BUILDING FOR THE

LAW SCHOOL - HEALTH OF MY FATHER - Ilis VieWS AND FEELINGS AS TO HIS RESIGNATION PUBLICATION OF COMMENTARIES on PROMISSORY NOTES— LETTERS FROM PROFESSOR MITTERMAIER AND MR. BURGE — NOMINATION FOR THE PRESIDENCY — LETTER ON MR. SUMNER'S ORATION ON THE TRUE GRANDEUR OF Nations CASES IN THE CIRCUIT COURT - LETTER RELATING TO His REsIGNATION · ILLNESS DEATH FUNERAL RESOLUTIONS BY THE BAR OF THE SUPREME COURT, AND OF THE VARIOUS STATES PORTRAITS.

THESE preliminaries being arranged, my father again devoted himself with renewed zeal to his professorial duties. On the third day of July, a festival was given, in celebration of the completion of two large wings, which it had been found necessary to add to the Law Building, in order to accommodate it to the increased number of students, and to afford a larger space for the library. In superintending the progress of these additions, my father took great interest, and, a few days before the celebration, he carried me, with other friends, over the rooms, pointing out their conveniences, and with great enthusiasm expatiating on the delightful days in store for him, little foreseeing that those dreams were never to be realized. The following letter refers to the festival :

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