Jack Adams, the Mutineer

Forsideomslag
Henry Colburn, 1838
 

Hvad folk siger - Skriv en anmeldelse

Vi har ikke fundet nogen anmeldelser de normale steder.

Udvalgte sider

Andre udgaver - Se alle

Almindelige termer og sætninger

Populære passager

Side 49 - ... shillings the bushel ; it is of a round shape, and hath a thick tough rind ; when the fruit is ripe it is yellow and soft, and the taste is sweet and pleasant. The natives of Guam use it for bread. They gather it, when full grown, while it is green and hard ; then they bake it in an oven, which scorcheth the rind and makes it black, but they scrape off the outside black crust, and there remains a tender thin crust ; and the inside is soft, tender, and white, like the crumb of a penny-loaf.
Side 265 - ... of figures, which at this time presented themselves to each other. An indifferent spectator would have been at a loss which most to admire — the eyes of famine sparkling at immediate relief, or the horror of their preservers at the sight of so many spectres, whose ghastly countenances, if the cause had been unknown, would rather have excited terror than pity.
Side 49 - They gather it when full grown, while it is green and hard: then they bake it in an oven, which scorcheth the rind, and makes it black; but they scrape off the outside black crust, and there remains a tender thin crust; and the inside is soft, tender and white, like the crumb of a penny loaf. There is neither seed nor stone in the inside, but all is of a pure substance like bread. It must be eaten new; for, if it is kept above twenty-four hours, it grows harsh and choaky; but it is very pleasant...
Side 49 - The bread-fruit," says this navigator, " grows on a large tree, as big and high as our largest apple trees ; it hath a spreading head, full of branches, and dark leaves. The fruit grows on the boughs like apples ; it is as big as a penny loaf, when wheat is at five shillings the bushel ; it is of a round shape, and hath a thick tough rind. When the fruit is ripe, it is yellow and soft, and the taste is sweet and pleasant. The natives of Guam use it for bread. They gather it when full grown, while...
Side 266 - ... whose ghastly countenances, if the cause had been unknown, would rather have excited terror than pity. Our bodies were nothing but skin and bones, our limbs were full of sores, and we were clothed in rags: in this condition, with the tears of joy and gratitude flowing down our cheeks, the people of Timor beheld us with a mixture of horror, surprise, and pity.
Side 233 - The allowance now regularly served to each person was one twentyfifth of a pound of bread, and a quarter of a pint of water, at eight in the morning, at noon, and at sunset. Today...
Side 50 - It must be eaten new ; for if it is kept above twenty-four hours, it grows harsh and choaky; but it is very pleasant before it is too stale. This fruit lasts in season eight months in the year, during which the natives eat no other sort of food of bread kind. I did never see of this fruit anywhere but here.
Side 208 - I found in the boat was one hundred and fifty pounds of bread, sixteen pieces of pork — each...
Side 239 - I conclude that a heavy sea sets in here with a northerly wind. This day being the anniversary of the restoration of King Charles the Second, and the name not being inapplicable to our present situation (for we were restored to fresh life and strength) I named this Restoration Island; for I thought it probable that Captain Cook might not have taken notice of it.
Side 261 - Palm from the leaf spreading like a fan; but here we saw no signs of cultivation, nor had the country so fine an appearance as to the eastward. This, however, was only a small tract, for by sunset it improved again, and I saw several great smokes where the inhabitants were clearing and cultivating their grounds. We had now run...

Bibliografiske oplysninger