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WRITTEN IN EARLY MANHOOD,

AND MIDDLE LIFE.

VOL. I.

8

FACILE credo, plures esse Naturas invisibiles quam visibiles in rerum universitate. Sed horum omnium familiam quis nobis enarrabit, et gradus et cognationes et discrimina et singulorum munera ? Quid agunt? quæ loca habitant ? Harum rerum notitiam semper ambivit ingenium humanum, nunquam attigit. Juvat, interea, non diffiteor, quandoque in animo, tanquam in tabulâ, majoris et melioris mundi imaginem contemplari: ne mens assuefacta hodiernæ vitæ minu- . tiis se contrahat nimis, et tota subsidat in pusillas cogitationes. Sed veritati interea invigilandum est, modusque servandus, ut certa ab incertis, diem a nocte, distinguamus.-T. BURNET. ARCHÆOL. PHIL. p. 68

Speritical experience of Mariner is real.

TUE

RIME OF THE ANCIENT MARINER.*

IN SEVEN PARTS.

PART I.

Mariner meeteth

It is an ancient Mariner,

An ancient
And he stoppeth one of three.

three gal-
“ By thy long gray beard and glittering lants bidden
eye,

ding-feast,
Now wherefore stopp’st thou me?

to a wed

and detain-
eth one.

The Bridegroom's doors are opened

wide,
And I am next of kin;
The guests are met, the feast is set :
May'st hear the merry din.”

He holds him with his skinny hand,
“ There was a ship,” quoth he.
“ Hold off! unhand me, gray-beard

loon!”
Eftsoons his hand dropt he.

* See Note.

and con

The Wed. He holds him with his glittering eye-
ding-Guest
is spell- The Wedding-Guest stood still,
bound by
the eye of And listens like a three years' child :
the old sea-
faring man, The Mariner hath his will.
strained to
hear his

The Wedding-Guest sat on a stone:
He cannot choose but hear;
And thus spake on that ancient man,
The bright-eyed Mariner.

tale.

“ The ship was cheered, the harbour

cleared,
Merrily did we drop
Below the kirk, below the hill,
Below the light-house top.

The Ma

The sun came up upon the left, riner tells how the Out of the sea came he ! ship sailed southward And he shone bright, and on the right to with a good

Went down into the, sea.

wind and fair weath

er, till it

reached the Line.

Higher and higher every day,
Till over the mast at noon-
The Wedding-Guest here beat his

breast,
For he heard the loud bassoon.

32 2

The Wed. The bride hath paced into the hall,
heareth the Red as a rose is she;
sic; but the Nodding their heads before her goes
continueth The merry minstrelsy.

bridal mu

his tale.

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