The Lore of the Forest

Forsideomslag
Cosimo, Inc., 1. jan. 2005 - 324 sider
Sacred Groves and Tree Nymphs, Yule Logs and Divining Rods, Wild Huntsmen and Wood-Wives . . . Delve into an enchanting exploration of the magic and mystery of forest realms in this scholarly and highly readable work. Fact and fable sit side by side with snippets of Shakespeare and ancient legend to create a mythology of the woods throughout human history.Since its original publication in 1928, this lively guide to the folklore of the forest around the world has also appeared under such titles as The Forest in Folklore and Mythology and Forest Folklore, Mythology and Romance. It has become a beloved sourcebook and reference guide for environmentalists, anthropologists, Wiccans, and nature lovers alike.AUTHOR BIO: Scottish author ALEXANDER PORTEOUS was a professor of philosophy whose work appeared in various philosophical journals, which include The Town Council Seals of Scotland; Historical, Legendary and Heraldic (1906) and The History of Crieff from the Earliest Times to the Dawn of the Twentieth Century (1912).

Fra bogen

Hvad folk siger - Skriv en anmeldelse

Vi har ikke fundet nogen anmeldelser de normale steder.

Indhold

I
9
II
21
III
34
IV
44
V
84
VI
149
VII
191
VIII
245
IX
270
X
307
Copyright

Andre udgaver - Se alle

Almindelige termer og sætninger

Populære passager

Side 102 - I know a bank whereon the wild thyme blows, Where ox-lips and the nodding violet grows ; Quite over-canopied with lush woodbine, With sweet musk-roses, and with eglantine...
Side 251 - Like leaves on trees the race of man is found, Now green in youth, now withering on the ground; Another race the following spring supplies; They fall successive, and successive rise: So generations in their course decay; So flourish these, when those are pass'd away.
Side 39 - If it please the king, let letters be given me to the governors beyond the river, that they .may convey me over till I come into Judah ; and a letter unto Asaph the keeper...
Side 68 - From the still glassy lake that sleeps Beneath Aricia's trees — Those trees in whose dim shadow The ghastly priest doth reign, The priest who slew the slayer, And shall himself be slain...
Side 102 - These are the forgeries of jealousy : And never, since the middle summer's spring Met we on hill, in dale, forest, or mead, By paved fountain, or by rushy brook, Or on the beached margent of the sea, To dance our ringlets to the whistling wind, But with thy brawls thou hast disturb'd our sport.
Side 46 - And they left all the commandments of the LORD their God, and made them molten images, even two calves, and made a grove, and worshipped all the host of heaven, and served Baal.
Side 46 - He removed the high places, and brake the images, and cut down the groves, and brake in pieces the brazen serpent that Moses had made: for unto those days the children of Israel did burn incense to it: and he called it Nehushtan.
Side 176 - With bitter tears she wept her last offence ; And still she weeps, nor sheds her tears in vain ; For still the precious drops her name retain.
Side 77 - Thammuz came next behind, Whose annual wound in Lebanon allured The Syrian damsels to lament his fate In amorous ditties all a summer's day; While smooth Adonis from his native rock Ran purple to the sea, supposed with blood Of Thammuz yearly wounded...

Bibliografiske oplysninger