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THE

WORKS OF HORACE,

WITH

ENGLISH NOTES,

ORIGINAL AND SELECTED.

BY

JOSEPH CURRIE,

ONE OF THE CLASSICAL MASTERS OF THE GLASGOW ACADEMY.

WITH NUMEROUS ILLUSTRATIONS.

LONDON AND GLASGOW:

RICHARD GRIFFIN AND COMPANY,
PUBLISHERS TO THE UNIVERSITY OF GLASGOW.

207. a. 177.

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PREFACE.

THE "NOTES ON HORACE" have occupied the leisure of the Editor for several years. It is hoped that they will be found generally useful and trustworthy. They are based upon those of Orelli, Dillenburger, and Doering, and are intended to be to the School and College Student what those able Latin Commentaries are to the accomplished Scholar. Considerable assistance has been derived from the labours of Dr Anthon, Pemble, Macleane, Keightley, Heindorf, and others; but never, it is believed, in the case of original matter, without acknowledgment. Information has been obtained from many collateral sources, and incorporated with much that is believed to be original.

The Text followed is substantially that of Orelli, except in the spelling of a few words, such as baca, iam, Juppiter, volnus, volt, which have been changed into bacca, jam, Jupiter, vulnus, vult. The various readings have been given and explained, whenever they were judged of sufficient importance to merit notice; but difficulties have never been slurred over by adopting emendations.

All the Odes, &c., have been annotated; for, so long as complete editions may be had in abundance, expurgated editions, like other shams, will be productive of more injury than good. By presenting nothing but what is beautiful and worthy of remembrance, they excite an undue admiration in favour of the author, while they serve not merely to indicate the objectionable passages, but to invest them with an adventitious interest and favour. In this, as in other matters, the honest course is the best. Moreover, the works of Horace are a vivid history of the age in which he lived; and just in proportion as they are mutilated, they fail to show what was written, read, and appreciated among a civilized people devoid of Christianity. Horace wrote nothing which was then considered beneath the dignity of a gentleman, though he may have written much which we ought not to admire.

The manner in which his objectionable passages are treated, may be seen by referring to the introductions given to Ode i. 4; i. 9; and iv. 7. Such Odes are not without utility, as they show the highest views of life which a heathen poet could conceive; while ignorance in regard to these passages is no security for either innocence of conduct, or soundness of belief.

The Scanning has been indicated at the commencement of each Ode. This is not required in the Satires and Epistles, as these are in Hexameter verse; but wherever peculiarities occur in either, they are pointed out in the Notes.

Much space has been saved by the manner in which the Text is quoted for translation. Only the first and last of the Latin words have been given, and the place of the intervening ones supplied by an &c. and a dash. References are given to avoid repetitions. No unusual abbreviations have been employed except Cp. which stands for Compare.

The value of the work is much enhanced by numerous Woodcuts, taken from the best authorities.

In order to foster habits of observation and reflection on the part of the student, the Author has given a literal, as well as a free translation, of many idiomatic expressions, along with a vast variety of miscellaneous knowledge, in addition to what was absolutely required. All glowing eulogiums, however, on the beauties of the Text, and long lists of learned names in favour of particular views, have been avoided, as these are more calculated to engender pedantry than to promote research.

By being printed apart from the Text, the Notes are rendered more convenient for home consultation than if they were at the foot of the page, while they do not tempt the pupil, when in school, to impose upon himself and his class-fellows by reading them off unobserved by the master.

GLASGOW ACADEMY,

March, 1860.

J. C.

Q. HORATII FLACCI

CARMINUM

LIBER PRIMUS.

CARM. I.-AD MAECENATEM.

MAECENAS atavis edite regibus,
O et praesidium et dulce decus meum,
Sunt quos curriculo pulverem Olympicum
Collegisse juvat, metaque fervidis
Evitata rotis palmaque nobilis
Terrarum dominos evehit ad deos;
Hunc, si mobilium turba Quiritium
Certat tergeminis tollere honoribus;

Illum, si proprio condidit horreo,
Quidquid de Libycis verritur areis.
Gaudentem patrios findere sarculo
Agros Attalicis conditionibus

Nunquam dimoveas, ut trabe Cypria
Myrtoum pavidus nauta secet mare.
Luctantem Icariis fluctibus Africum
Mercator metuens, otium et oppidi
Laudat rura sui; mox reficit rates
Quassas, indocilis pauperiem pati.
Est qui nec veteris pocula Massici
Nec partem solido demere de die

Spernit, nunc viridi membra sub arbuto
Stratus, nunc ad aquae lene caput sacrae.
Multos castra juvant et lituo tubae
Permixtus sonitus bellaque matribus

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