Annual Meeting: Proceedings, Constitution, List of Active Members, and Addresses

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Side 107 - And he spake of trees, from the cedar tree that is in Lebanon even unto the hyssop that springeth out of the wall: he spake also of beasts, and of fowl, and of creeping things, and of fishes.
Side 42 - We know that we can none of us read the great Masters in any foreign literature, or enjoy them like natives, because we cannot speak their language like natives. For the characteristic peculiarities, and essential beauty and power of their gifted minds are concealed in those idiomatic phrases, those unobtrusive particles, those racy combinations, which, as they were first produced by the prompt eloquence and passions of immediate intercourse, can be comprehended and felt only by those who seek them...
Side 43 - ... characteristic peculiarities and essential beauty and power of their gifted minds are concealed in those idiomatic phrases, those unobtrusive particles, those racy combinations, which, as they were first produced by the prompt eloquence and passions of immediate intercourse, can be comprehended and felt only by those who seek them in the sources from which they flow : so that, other things being equal, he will always be found best able to read and enjoy the great writers in a foreign language,...
Side 74 - ... the highest assurance, and in fact comes the nearest to an actual exhibition of the matter to be demonstrated. In all species of illustrations the least general truth should first be presented to the eye of the student, and those modes of demonstration which partake of the nature of abstractions, reserved for a more advanced stage of his progress. This is only following out the principle of induction ; or perhaps we ought to say, it is the first and best period for the application of that important...
Side 74 - ... susceptible of a complete exhibition to the same sense, with all the details which science would make known. In these departments of knowledge, the most satisfactory illustration is doubtless to be found in the exhibition of the thing itself which we would explain. Yet, owing to the complication of parts and the intricate or concealed structure of an object, it may happen that more clearness will be given by well executed drawings, than even by the immediate inspection of an object of this description....
Side 43 - ... has never ceased to remember that it is a living and a spoken tongue. Gentlemen: The general views so imperfectly developed in this discussion are not new. They coincide with the suggestions made by Lord Bacon, and with the systems pursued and recommended by Cardinal Wolsey and Roger Ascham, by Milton and Locke, and by the vast majority of skilful teachers in those parts of Europe where Education at the present time is the best conducted and advanced the furthest. The substance of the whole is,...
Side 92 - Haply some hoary-headed swain may say, "Oft have we seen him at the peep of dawn Brushing, with hasty step, the dews away, To meet the sun upon the upland lawn...
Side 74 - ... directly, but may have recourse to some of its analogies, and thence obtain a parallel relation to things capable of being presented to the eye. Thus, we cannot exhibit directly to the senses, the manner in which a charge of electricity is distributed over the surface of a prime conductor ; but by the intervention of motion produced in the index of a torsion balance by a small insulated metallic plane applied successively to the different parts of the conductor, and at each trial presented to...
Side 110 - I would earnestly press the remark on the consideration of every one who honours these pages with a perusal, that very much of the pupil's success depends upon attention to seemingly minute points, when first beginning to write. Deviations from a judicious course commenced at that period, are apt to be followed by the worst consequences, and often, the evil done is without remedy, from the fixedness of the habit. The pupil should sit in an easy, upright posture. His seat should be near the...
Side 75 - Thus also the different kinds of timber are sometimes formed into boxes in the shape of books, containingsamples of the bark, leaves, flowers, fruits, roots, and seeds. The insects which inhabit or infest each, are sometimes added. In the next place, we may construct artificial, but accurate models of some races in the vegetable kingdom, of which actual specimens cannot be easily preserved. Thus the cryptogamous class has been successfully imitated in wax ; and the trade of making artificial plants...

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