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Edinburgh Magazine,

0R,
LITERARY MISCELLANY,

FOR DECEMBER 1790.

With a View of STOCKBRIDGE and ST BERNARD'S.,

TENTS:

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Siste of the BAROMETER in inches and decimals, and of Farenheit's THERE

MOMETER in the open air, taken in the morning before fun-rise, and a noon; and the quantity of rain-water fallen, in inches and decinals, froin November 30th, to the 30th of December 1790, near the foot of Ar thur's Seat.

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0.04

0.08

, 33, 29.475 1

28.8

0.14
29.525
29.2812 0.23
29.65
30.375
30.05
29.95 0.03
29.9 0.06

29.80
1. 29.54

29.43 0.12
29.5
29.0125

0.16
28.9

0.40
28.45 0.04
29.05
28.825

0.03
29.35
29.375
29.475
29.2 0.32
29.125

0.61
29.775
29.525

0.04
30.
29.675

0.05
29.625

29.975 - 35

29.5

0.69 | 40 | 29.7

Quantity of Rain, 2.63

Sleet.
Snow.
Clear.
Rain.
Clear.
Ditto.
Diito.
Cloudy.
Small Showers,
Clear.
Rain.
Sleer.
Ciear.
Sleet.
Small Showers,
Sleet.
Clear,
Small Showers
Clear.
Ditto.
Rain.
Sleet.
Ditto.
Showery.
Ditto.
Clear.
Showerys
Clear.
Ditto.
Rain.
Clear.

0.1

0.06

39

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THE following anecdotes are sides, in such disorder, that it was

I translated from the German impollible for him to thew it. I have Journal of the travels of M. d'Uffen. however, ben informed that it is bach, Magiltrate and Sinator of the large, and contains many curious artiimperial city of Frankfort, who died cles. But Leibnitz, it seems, wishes in 1734. That journal forms three to enjoy it alone, and the Elector large volumes, and describes with, himself has never once feen it, his for the most part, tisgusting minu eness, learned privy counsellor always inevery inc dent that happened to the forming nim that it is not yet arrangauthir. This very minuteness, bow- ed. As to his own library, he made ever, becomes interesting upon particu- many excuses, adding, that it contain: Jar occasions, as we hope the reader ed nothing except a small number will acknowledge in the following a- of MSS. which he would go and necdotes of the celebrated Leib. fetch us.” nilz

Here M. d' Uffenbach mentions M. d'Uffenbach passed through several manufcripts which Leibnitza Hanover in 1710, where Leibnitz made use of, either for ois vast and thea lived. On the oth of January useful compilation the Scriptores Branca in the morning, says tie traveller, I fwicense, or for that intitled Accelsio. was engaged in writing letters, but in nes Historicæ. At last he shewed therd the ariernoon we mide ourselves be an- tourteen little books in chinese cha. nounced to the celebrated and learn- racters, which F. Bouvet, a Jeluit ed Cou follor, who inmediately invi- millionary, had sent him. But when ted us to his house. Though he is he was asked to explain what they now upwards of 60 years of age, and concainel, he discovered that the let. though his dress gave him a very ter he had received along with them oud lauk, his stockings buing furred, was not to be found ; a circumstance his night-govn also furret, with large which our traveller does not seem al. socks of felt instead of flippers, and together to believe. Night however his perriwig of a muaftious jength, yet interrupted their conversation for he is a very engaging man. He re. this time. ceived us with the greatest politeness, In the afternoon of the second day, and conversed wich us on various (for M. d' Uffinbach is very scru. Suljects of politics and literature. pulous as to dates) Leibnitz returned He informed us, among other things, the visit of our travellers, and informthat he was the author of the letter ed them that it was he, and not M. against F. Hardouin, which la Croze Eccari, who had inserted, in a pe. inserted in his treatise againit that Je. siodical paper of Hanover, some refait so famous for luis paraiioxes. . marks on an old book of chiromancy,

"I endeavour d, lays d' Uffen- preserved in the ducal library at Wolbach, to break off the conversation, fenbutel. He also told them that he that I might requist a light of his li. had caused to be copied at length all brary, and of the Elector's. But it the passages of the ancient civilians happened, as we had been told it which are fourd fcittcred in the di. wouid, for he always evades any re- geft; not merely the firit word of quelt on these two subjects. As to each passage, as a compiler of the 16th the Elector's library he told us it was century named Lubitus had done, in only a closer library, composed of an index of which M. Terrassun modern books on history, and be speaks at length in his history of the

Roman

3

A 2

Roman Law. I Thall leave our tra- complaining of the little assistance be veller to bake his ren.arks on this la- received from the historical records borious performance, which may serve of the 12th, 13th, and 14th centuries, ' to give the true sense of the passages and he expresied a great inclinat op to which have been mutilated by Tri- see a valgable manuscript relating to bonian. . I shall only remark, that Wurtzburg, in the poffeffion of M. de Leibnitz cannot have the honour of Uffenbach; but our good magistrale this as a new idea ; for the celebrated rememberiog the refusal that had been Caj cius, in explaining the Roman made him with regard to the Electoral

Lar to his pupils, collected all the Library, was not rash in promining; - extracts from Ulpian, from Paul, and " I kept myself on my guard, says he,

foon Caius, what are dispersed thro' and offered with circumspection, for I the Corpus Puris.

know well that M. Leibnitz was w ilLeibnitz then talked of the trouble ing to receive all, but to communicare he had been at in perfecting the cata- nothing.” logue of the rich library of Wolfen- The discourse then turning upon an. butel, which is famous, particularly cient geography, and upen Cellarius,

for the manuscripts it contains. He Leibnitz cold an anecdote of that learn· had made out a catalogue of the books ed man which he had from himself,

and manuscripts arranged in the or. namely that he never meant to carry der of the dates, which he consider- his geography of the middle ages fur. ed as the true basis of a literary his- ther than Charlemagne. Accu!lome! tory, as by that means it may be as he was to the pure and elegant Hile krwn what each age, or each year of the good authors of antiquity, he produced, and what particular study could not resolve to plunge into the was more or less cultivated at any barbarisms of later writers and repart'cular time.

cords. The conversation at this time was It is needless to detail the many terminate by remarks on the travels questions made by d'Uffenbach, with into Greect by Wheeler, Sinith and great address, in order to inducr Leib

other learried Englishmen, in search nitz to thew him the Hanoveriao li. * of the monument. eraining in that brary. Ii is a matter of little mo

ancient native country of the fine arts. ment to pofterity to be informed of Leibnitz observed that these travellers the curiosity of a magiftrate of Frankou;ht no: to have confined themselves fort to see that collection of books. to the discovery of medals, or frag. But it is interesting to know, that aments of inscrip:ions, the explication midst the vast occupations of Le boitz, of which is almost always conje&tural, and at a time when he was Ixty years and rarely useful ; but that they ought of age, he was proposing to collect, unto have been indefatiable in the fearch der the title of Cimelia Philofopbica, atte: vanuscripts, many of which must some manuscripts of Descartes, ot Pala still exist, and would thiow light on the cal, and even of Campanella, to which ja o of the Eastern Empre, of which he meant to add a few pieces more w have only a very imperfect idea ancient, and little known, which be froin the books called Basilica. expected from Fabricius. '. · A few days afterwards, our travel- This literary avarice, this passion

ler returned to Leibnitz to take leave, for reading and enjoying exclusively wen there was a renewal of civilities the rare monuments of antiquity, was, and learned discourses. The philolo. io Leibnitz, the effc& of a towering ph.r.fo in turned the converfation up. salent, which inclined him equally to

op himself and his second volume of all the scieoces, and which enabled · The Scriptores rerum Brunswicenfium, him as it were to create anew those

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