The Yale Review, Bind 2

Forsideomslag
George Park Fisher, George Burton Adams, Henry Walcott Farnam, Arthur Twining Hadley, John Christopher Schwab, William Fremont Blackman, Edward Gaylord Bourne, Irving Fisher, Henry Crosby Emery, Wilbur Lucius Cross
Blackwell, 1894
 

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Populære passager

Side 408 - But if a long train of abuses, prevarications, and artifices, all tending the same way, make the design visible to the people, and they cannot but feel what they lie under and see whither they are going, it is not to be wondered that they should then rouse themselves and endeavor to put the rule into such hands which may secure to them the ends for which government was at first erected...
Side 407 - That government is, or ought to be, instituted for the common benefit, protection, and security of the people, nation, or community...
Side 142 - Whenever any citizen of the United States discovers a deposit of guano on any island, rock, or key, not within the lawful jurisdiction of any other government, and not occupied by the citizens of any other government, and takes peaceable possession thereof, and occupies the same, such island, rock, or key may, at the discretion of the President, be considered as appertaining to the United States.
Side 255 - Not only, therefore, can there be no loss of separate and independent autonomy to the States, through their union under the Constitution, but it may be not unreasonably said that the preservation of the States, and the maintenance of their governments, are as much within the design and care of the Constitution as the preservation of the Union and the maintenance of the National government. The Constitution, in all its provisions, looks to an indestructible Union, composed of indestructible States.
Side 405 - Men being, as has been said, by nature all free, equal, and independent, no one can be put out of this estate, and subjected to the political power of another, without his own consent.
Side 398 - having endeavored to subvert the constitution of this kingdom by breaking the original contract between King and People, and by the advice of Jesuits and other wicked persons having violated the fundamental laws, and having withdrawn himself out of the kingdom, has abdicated the Government, and that the throne is thereby vacant.
Side 140 - ... there are laws of political as well as of physical gravitation ; and if an apple, severed by the tempest from its native tree, cannot choose but fall to the ground, Cuba, forcibly disjoined from its own unnatural connection with Spain, and incapable of self-support, can gravitate only towards the North American Union, which, by the same law of nature, cannot cast her off from its bosom.
Side 249 - Confederation have inconsiderately endeavored to accomplish impossibilities ; to reconcile a partial sovereignty in the Union, with complete sovereignty in the States ; to subvert a mathematical axiom, by taking away a part, and letting the whole remain.
Side 247 - His Britannic Majesty acknowledges the said United States, viz. New Hampshire, Massachusetts Bay, Rhode Island, and Providence Plantations, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia, to be free, sovereign and independent States...
Side 343 - Government for the control and management of public affairs and the protection of the public peace is hereby established, to exist until terms of union with the United States of America have been negotiated and agreed upon.

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