Woman's Work in the Civil War: A Record of Heroism, Patriotism and Patience

Forsideomslag
Zeigler, McCurdy & Company, 1867 - 799 sider
Women's Work in the Civil War highlights the many ways that women participated during the war. Whether they disguised themselves as men to take to the battlefield, served as nurses or passed along valuable information as spies, women played an enormously important role during the course of the American Civil War.
 

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again wounded and in the enemys linesShe removes him and succors the wounded
225
MRS ARABELLA GRIFFITH BARLOW
227
MRS NELLIE MARIA TAYLOR
233
MRS ADALINE TYLER
241
MRS WILLIAM H HOLSTEIN
251
The death of her husband Governor Louis P HarveyHer intense griefShe resolves to derote
265
Her birth and educationHer preparation for service in the hospitalsReceives instruction
273
MRS ALMIRA FALES
279
PAGE
284
MRS MARY MORRIS HUSBAND
287
THE HOSPITAL TRANSPORT SERVICE
299
The organization of this service by the United States Sanitary CommissionDifficulties
316
States Sanitary CommissionOther labors for the soldiers 318323
318
THE MISSES WOOLSEY
324
ANNA MARIA ROSS
343
MRS G T M DAVIS
352
An angel at Cairo_That little gal that used to come in every day to see usI tell
357
Early efforts for the soldiersShe urges the organization of Aid Societies and these become
373
Previous pursuitsIn the hospitals in Tennessee in the summer and autumn of 1862A remark
379
A native of BostonCame to St Louis in 1861 and entered upon hospital work in January
384
M Jarsh appointed Medical Inspector of Department of the SouthEarly in 1863
388
Her birth and parentageHer residence in Germany and SwitzerlandHer fondness for study
390
MISS DOROTHEA L DIX
392
CLARA DAVIS
400
Mrs Hawley accompanies her husband Colonel Hawley to South CarolinaTeaching the freed
416
JESSIE HOME
422
Miss Vance a missionary teacher before the warAppointed by Miss Dix to a Baltimore hos
430
PAGI
431
Missionary teachers before the warAttending lectures to prepare for nursing After the first
437
C HALL
448
ANNAPOLIS
455
The Maine slay of the Annapolis HospitalMiss TitcombMiss NewhallMiss UsherOther
461
MRS A H AND MISS S H GIBBONS
467
MRS E J RUSSELL
477
agpinBrandy StationA stove half a yard squareThe battles of the WildernessAt
480
NEW ENGLAND WOMENS AUXILIARY ASSOCIATION
553
Iler birth and early educationHer marriageHer familyShe identifies herself from the
562
THE NORTHWESTERN SANITARY COMMISSION
566
Mrs Livermores childhood and educationShe becomes a teacherHer marriageShe is asso
577
GENERAL AID SOCIETY FOR THE ARMY BUFFALO
590
tifarious laborsThe Military Hospitals in DetroitThe Soldiers Home in Detroit
596
The origin of the CommissionIts early laborsMrs Porters connection with itHer determi
603
The Milwaukie Ladies Soldiers Aid SocietyLabors of Mrs Jackson Mrs Delafield and others
607
MRS ELIZABETH S MENDENHALL
617
ST LOUIS LADIES UNION AID SOCIETY
630
She dies of heartdisease in May 1861 643649
643
LADIES AID SOCIETY OF PHILADELPHIA
645
WOMENS RELIEF ASSOCIATION OF BROOKLYN AND LONG ISLAND
650
MRS ELIZABETH M STREETER
659
MRS CURTIS T FENN
666
MRS JAMES HARLAN
676
Childhood and youth of Mrs GageAntislavery views inculcated by her parents and grand
683
MRS LUCY GAYLORD POMEROY
691
MARIA R MANY
697
SARAH J HAGAR
704
M HALLOWELL
710
LADIES DISTINGUISHED FOR SERVICES IN SOLDIERS
717
and Soldiers Rest for the next fifteen monthsThe Northwestern Sanitary and Soldiers
719
MISS HATTIE WISWALL
725
MISS CHARLOTTE BRADFORD
731
PAGE
738
MRS ANNIE ETHERIDGE
747
PAGE
754
BURGER STEARNS
760
OTHER DEFENDERS OF THE FLAG
767
THE WOMEN OF GETTYSBURG
775
Names of loyal Southern Women already mentionedThe loyal women of RichmondTheir
779
FINAL CHAPTER
787
INDEX OF NAMES OF LADIES 795800
795
Previous historySecretary Ladies Aid SocietyHer decision to go to the frontEarly
797

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Side 757 - Over the heads of the rebel host. Ever its torn folds rose and fell On the loyal winds that loved it well ; And through the hill-gaps sunset light Shone over it with a warm good-night. Barbara Frietchie's work is o'er, And the Rebel rides on his raids no more. Honor to her ! and let a tear Fall, for her sake, on Stonewall's bier.
Side 756 - It shivered the window, pane and sash; It rent the banner with seam and gash. Quick, as it fell, from the broken staff Dame Barbara snatched the silken scarf. She leaned far out on the window-sill, And shook it forth with a royal will. "Shoot, if you must, this old gray head, But spare your country's flag," she said. A shade of sadness, a blush of shame, Over the face of the leader came; The nobler nature within him stirred To life at that woman's deed and word; "Who touches a hair of yon gray head...
Side 755 - Fair as a garden of the Lord To the eyes of the famished rebel horde On that pleasant morn of the early fall When Lee marched over the mountain wall, Over the mountains winding down, Horse and foot into Frederick town.
Side 756 - In her attic window the staff she set. To show that one heart was loyal yet. Up the street came the Rebel tread, Stonewall Jackson riding ahead. Under his slouched hat left and right He glanced; the old flag met his sight. 0 Halt! " — the dust-brown ranks stood fast •Fire!
Side 569 - Come, humble sinner, in whose breast A thousand thoughts revolve; Come, with your guilt and fear oppressed, And make this last resolve. 2 I'll go to Jesus, though my sin Hath like a mountain rose, I know His courts, I'll enter in Whatever may oppose.
Side 323 - I am not eager, bold, Nor strong — all that is past; I am ready not to 'do At last, at last. My half day's work is done, And this is all my part ; I give a patient God My patient heart, And grasp His banner still, Though all its blue be dim ; These stripes, no less than stars, Lead after Him.
Side 135 - One afternoon, just before the evacuation, when the atmosphere of our rooms was close and foul, and all were longing for a breath of our cooler northern air, while the men were moaning in pain, or were restless with fever, and our hearts were sick with pity for the sufferers, I heard a light step upon the stairs; and looking up I saw a young lady enter, who brought with her such an atmosphere of calm and cheerful courage, so much freshness, such an expression of gentle, womanly sympathy, that her...
Side 81 - I prefer to give you money, if it will do as much good." " Very well ;. then give money, which we need badly, and without which we cannot do what is most necessary for our brave sick men." " Then I will give you the entire earnings of the next two weeks. I'd give more, but I have to help support my mother, who is an invalid. Generally, I make but one vest a day, but I will work earlier and later these two weeks.
Side 82 - Opening her portemonnaie, she counted out — how much do you think, reader? — nineteen dollars and thirty-seven cents ! Every penny was earned by the slow needle, and she had stitched away into the hours of midnight, on every one of the working days of the week. We call that an instance of patriotism married to generosity. SOME farmers...
Side 325 - ... was managed at first : The surgeons left in care of the wounded three or four miles out from the town, went up and down among the men in the morning, and said, 'Any of you boys who can make your way to the cars can go to Baltimore.' So off start all who think they feel well enough ; anything better than the 'hospitals,' so called, for the first few days after a battle.

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