The True and the Beautiful: In Nature, Art, Morals, and Religion

Forsideomslag
Wiley and Halstead, 1859 - 452 sider
 

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Side 44 - Again, ye have heard that it hath been said by them of old time, Thou shalt not forswear thyself, but shalt perform unto the Lord thine oaths : but I say unto you, Swear not at all : neither by heaven ; for it is God's throne : nor by the earth ; for it is his footstool...
Side 401 - And he took up his parable and said, Balaam the son of Beor hath said, and the man whose eyes are open hath said...
Side 340 - I find this conclusion more impressed upon me, — that the greatest thing a human soul ever does in this world is to see something, and tell what it saw in a plain way. Hundreds of people can talk for one who can think, but thousands can think for one who can see. To see clearly is poetry, prophecy, and religion, — all in one.
Side 21 - That which doth assign unto each thing the kind, that which doth moderate the force and power, that which doth appoint the form and measure, of working, the same we term a law.
Side 39 - Nature never did betray The heart that loved her; 'tis her privilege, Through all the years of this our life, to lead From joy to joy: for she can so inform The mind that is within us, so impress With quietness and beauty, and so feed With lofty thoughts, that neither evil tongues, Rash judgments, nor the sneers of selfish men, Nor greetings where no kindness is, nor all The dreary intercourse of daily life, Shall e'er prevail against us, or disturb Our cheerful faith that all which we behold Is...
Side 403 - A servant with this clause makes drudgery divine; who sweeps a room, as for thy laws, makes that and the action fine.
Side 384 - My brethren have dealt deceitfully as a brook, and as the stream of brooks they pass away; Which are blackish by reason of the ice, and wherein the snow is hid: What time they wax warm, they vanish: when it is hot, they are consumed out of their place.
Side 437 - She riseth also while it is yet night and giveth meat to her household, and a portion to her maidens.
Side 411 - LET the day perish wherein I was born, and the night in which it was said, " There is a man child conceived.
Side xxvi - Where rose the mountains, there to him were friends; Where roll'd the ocean, thereon was his home; Where a blue sky and glowing clime extends, He had the passion and the power to roam; The desert, forest, cavern, breaker's foam, Were unto him companionship; they spake A mutual language, clearer than the tome Of his land's tongue, which he would oft forsake For nature's pages glass'd by sunbeams on the lake.

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