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highest degree, and breathes of a scholarship that must have made the author a phenomenon in the Guards.

The British Grenadiers.

“ Some talk of Alexander, and some of Hercules, - Of Conon and Lysander, and some Miltiades,

But of all the world's brave heroes, there's none that can compare,
With a tow row, row, row, row, row, to the British Grenadiers.

Chorus-But of all, &c.

None of your ancient heroes e'er saw a cannon-ball,
Or knew the force of powder, to slay their foes withall ;
But our brave boys do know it, and banish all their fears,
With a tow row, row, row, row, the British Grenadiers.

But our brave, &c.

Whene'er we are commanded to storm the palisades,
Our leaders march with fusees, and we with hand-grenades,
We throw them from the glacis about our enemies' ears,
With a tow row, row, row, row, the British Grenadiers.

We throw them, &c.
The God of War was pleased, and great Bellona smiles,
To see these noble heroes of our British isles ;
And all the Gods celestial, descending from their spheres,
Bebold with admiration the British grenadiers.

And all the Gods celestial, &c.

Then let us crown a bumper, and drink success to those
Who carry caps and pouches, and wear the louped clothes ;
May they and their commanders live happy all their years,
With a tow row, row, row, row, to the British Grenadiers !

May they and their commanders,” &c. It is almost superfluous to say, that Nassau, or the innumerable “ God those words are set to the most animated Save the Kings,”

,” “Electors,” Empeand manly melodies. The vigour of the rors,” &c.” flooding out yearly from verse implies it. Though excellence of the German school, to our noble meall music is its appropriateness, no man lody? The old English composers have will suppose that words like these are fully established their claim to distincconveyed to the ears of the earth in Sici- tion; and when Doctor Kitchener, in lianas and affetuosos. But for boldness, the fulness of years and publication, loftiness, and a direct connexion of shall descend to the elysium of paintenergy of sound, with energy of sense, ers, poets, and musicians, we predict they certainly have no superiors in the that the shades of Blow and Green, whole chronology of music. All the Purcell and Leveridge, will be waiting continent has been labouring to pro- at the entrance, deputed to lead him to duce a God save the King, and all its the softest seat, and overwhelm his efforts have failed. What are the brows with the greenest laurel. Vive Henri Quatre, the Wilhelmus von

“ At dubium est, habitare Deum sub pectore nostro ?
In cælumque redire animas, cæloque venire ?
Utque sit ex omni constructus corpore mundus,
Ætheris atque ignis summi, terræque, marisque,
Spiritum et in toto rapidum qui jussa,” &c.

Toryism set to music, it is still at the form accessible to our modern perforhead of affairs in Helicon, without mers, who would have been formidably costing itself an additional stave. Our repelled by its six-line staves, and its musicians have not been idle. The merciless variety of cleffs. This comcomplete published works of the Eng- position is "merely a ground or volunlish composers fill two hundred and fifty tary for the organ, of the four notes, folio volumes ; and we venture to pre- c, G, F, E, with twenty-six different dict, that the doctor's sale, serus in basses !and, as the editor pledges cælum, will be the choicest compila- himself, “is no more like them now tion black-letter melody that has sung, than a frog is like an ox." The been committed to the eloquence and editor's contemptuous conviction is, the hammer of a Christie, or an Evans, " that there is no other than mere since Queen Elizabeth played upon hearsay evidence or vague conjecture, the virginals.

as to the composer or the time of this This collection is attended with anthem, nor any proof that the words all imaginable advantages for all kinds or the music of God save the King, as of professors and performers. Regu- now sung, had been either seen or lar scores for the scientific; simple heard previously to October 1745, basses for the novice ; in brief, all when it was published in the Gentlethe cunning of counterpoint display- mau's Magazine. In the table of coned in all its charms. The introduc- tents prefixed to that month's magation discusses a question which had zine, it is styled, ‘God save our Lord lately excited infinite curiosity among the King, a new song.'”—This is powthe cognoscenti, and been the unhappy erful authority, but it has not altogeparent of a thick quarto the true his- ther cured the world of scepticism; tory of God save the King. The quarto and no subject can be worthier of the had decided that Doctor John Bull was summer consideration of my Lord the composer. No man will deny that Aberdeen and the Antiquarian Societhe song, if it ever had a composer at ty. In addition to this preface, curious all, ought to have had one bearing this little notices of the principal songs are name. But see “how a plain tale puts given, and the work, in general, is a down” a happy theory. "In all the vo- capital specimen of musical publicalumes left by the doctor, and they are tion. many and mighty, there is not a bar The names of the songs are a treaof the great symbol of loyalty. sure of loyalty in themselves, the

“It is recorded in page 205 of Ward's sound of a trumpet to the ear of all Lives of the Gresham Professors, that lovers of the Catch-club and the conone of Doctor John Bull's books con- stitution. The praises, healths, and tained a composition of his, which he prosperities of monarchy, take, as they entitled God save the Kinge.' The ought, the first place; and we have, editor has the volume in his posses- including " God save the King” twice sion, and in it there is indubitably a over, a whole succession of kingly meGod save the King, pressed into juxta- lodies, in all the forms of song, glee, position with a Fantarin, Felix af- catch, and chorus. We have thus, fertorium, a Levez vous Cæur, and a Long live the King, composed by Philis heft myn hert Gestoolén ; but Handel, in 1745,” for the Gentlemen this associate of love and piety, Latin, Volunteers of the City of London. French, and Dutch, is no more like the words are true, honest, straightthe true, than the Doctor to Hercules. forward allegiance, and such as might In the present publication, the work bring discomfiture to the heart of any of Bull is not only made visible, but Whig, even in our day of rebellious brought, by the industry of Mr Ed- politics and romantic poetry. Ex. Gr. ward Jones, the King's bard, into a

“ Stand round, my brave boys,
With heart and with voice,

And all in full chorus agree;
We'll fight for our King,
And as loyally sing,

And let all the world know we'll be free.

“ The rebels shall fly,
As with shouts we draw nigh,

And Echo shall Victory ring ;
Then safe from alarms,
We'll rest on our arms,

And chorus it, ‘Long live the King !"" This is poetry to the purpose, -no Long live Great George,” (Dr rambling about groves and doves, lips Boyce, 1730.) and sips; no raving about sobs and sun- God preserve his Majesty,” (Dr

flowers, and “victory's moon;" but Blow, 1699.). proper words in proper places, and It is painful to pass over the poetry adapted to the capacity of volunteers. which gave force to those fine meloThe whole corporation of the Pierides dies. But Here's a health to our King could not have done it better.

has an irresistible claim on our comThis is followed by a long and wore memoration, from its having been a tby list of

favourite of Swift, a name “unmusi“ Great George is King,” (1745.).. cal to Volscian ears." The poetry is

“ Here's a health to our King," first-rate in its style. (1700.).

“ Here's a health to the King,
And a lasting peace;
May the factious (the Whigs) be hanged,
And Discord cease!

“Come, let us drink it while we've breath,
For there's no drinking after death;
And he that will this health deny,
Down among the dead men let him lie.

Down, down, down, down! (ad libitum.) Yet it has competitors, and Dr Blow’s renowned catch may rely on immortality, if such can be gained by pithiness of conclusion.

“ God preserve his Majesty,
And for ever send him victory,
And confound all his enemies !
-TAKE OFF YOUR HOCK, SIR!-

- Amen!"

No. 11., written in 1700, has all the merits of the Augustan era. It is true, terse, triumphant, and Toryish.

“ Here's a health to the King, who has said from his throne,
That his heart is true English, as well as our own.
“ And the Church, fixed by law, is resolved to maintain
Through the course of his life, and the course of his reign.
“ Thus we need not to fear any danger to come,

While our arms rule abroad, and our King reigns at home."
But Harrington's Round distances all the rest. The sentiment is as old as
the days of Alfred, and the phraseology was probably copied from the Runic.
It is the true sublime.

A Toast for the Enemies of Old England,

“ Cobweb breeches, hedgehog saddles,
Jolting horses, stony roads,
And tedious marchés, (in ælernum.")

The volume must now be left to its triumph, but a parting glance will fall from time to time on some fragment of touching and resistless captivation. What can be more native than the fine naval contempt of the beginning of Fight on, my boys?

“ Ye rakes and ye beaus, that wear the red clothes,
Come fight for your country, and conquer your foes ;
For the old British tars, they never fear'd wars ;

So fight on, my boys, we shall beat them,” &c.
The close of Jeremy Clarke's (1700) Song on“ St George,” is worthy of a
Greek epigram.

“All the world can't shew the like Saint.
All the sacrifice that we expend,
Is to drink fair, and to deal square,
And to love our friend.”

No. 43.-—" Come, my lads," should stand beside it in the Anthologia. It was written on a Spanish war.

“ Who cares a puff for France and Spain,

Soup maigre in alliance !
They'll soon be hang’d, as cross the main ;

We give them bold defiance.
“ The Monsieurs want some English beef;

Some pudding would delight then ;
We'll fill their bellies, ease their grief ;

And afterwards we'll fight them.” This is incomparably British ; at once brave and benevolent, contemptuous and charitable. The idea of first feeding and then killing, could not have occurred to any other than a great nation,

equally beef-eating and belligerent ; the spirit of agriculture and ambition could go no farther.

The praise of beef is, however, a subject at once so national and individual, that we are surprised at the editor's moderation, (to give it no more invidious name,) in limiting the glories of the matchless nutriment of British heroism to a single song. That one is, however, an apotheosis~ The renowned “Roast Beef of Old England,” (Leveridge, 1730.) The words have all the grace of fiction, and all the accuracy of history.

“ King Edward the Third, for his courage renown'd,
His son, at sixteen, who with laurels was crown'd,
Ate beef with their armies, so never gave ground !

Oh the roast beef of Old England, &c.
“ The Henrys, so famous in story of old,
The Fifth conquer'd France, and the Seventh, we're told,
Establish'd a band, to eat beef and look bold.

Oh the roast beef, &c.

“ When good Queen Elizabeth sat on the throne,
Ere coffee and tea, and such slip slop, were known,
The world was in terror, if c'er she did frown.

Oh the roast beef,” &c. The fortunate celebrity of the song almost prohibits quotation; and the Laus Kitcheneri must close ; yet the ** British Grenadiers“ detains the spirit still,” and the reader shall have the parting delight of a few couplets from a composition whose mythology and music might have given new ardour to the troops of Leonidas, or reversed the fates of Chæronea. It is Greek in the

highest degree, and breathes of a scholarship that must have made the author a phenomenon in the Guards.

The British Grenadiers.

“ Some talk of Alexander, and some of Hercules,
Of Conon and Lysander, and some Miltiades,
But of all the world's brave heroes, there's none that can compare,
With a tow row, row, row, row, row, to the British Grenadiers.

Chorus-But of all, &c.

None of your ancient heroes e'er saw a cannon-ball,
Or knew the force of powder, to slay their foes withall;
But our brave boys do know it, and banish all their fears,
With a tow row, row, row, row, the British Grenadiers.

But our brave, &c.

Whene'er we are commanded to storm the palisades,
Our leaders march with fusees, and we with hand-grenades,
We throw them from the glacis about our enemies' ears,
With a tow row, row, row, row, the British Grenadiers.

We throw them, &c.
The God of War was pleased, and great Bellona smiles,
To see these noble heroes of our British isles ;
And all the Gods celestial, descending from their spheres,
Behold with admiration the British grenadiers.

And all the Gods celestial, &c.
Then let us crown a bumper, and drink success to those
Who carry caps and pouches, and wear the louped clothes ;
May they and their commanders live happy all their years,
With a tow row, row, row, row, to the British Grenadiers !

May they and their commanders,” &c. It is almost superfluous to say, that Nassau, or the innumerable “ God those words are set to the most animated Save the Kings,” “ Electors,” Empeand manly melodies. The vigour of the rors,” &c.” Hooding out yearly from verse implies it. Though excellence of the German school, to our noble meall music is its appropriateness, no man lody? The old English composers have will suppose that words like these are fully established their claim to distincconveyed to the ears of the earth in Sici- tion; and when Doctor Kitchener, in lianas and affetuosos. But for boldness, the fulness of years and publication, loftiness, and a direct connexion of shall descend to the elysium of paintenergy of sound, with energy of sense, ers, poets, and musicians, we predict they certainly have no superiors in the that the shades of Blow and Green, whole chronology of music. All the Purcell and Leveridge, will be waiting continent has been labouring to pro- at the entrance, deputed to lead him to duce a God save the King, and all its the softest seat, and overwhelm his efforts have failed. What are the brows with the greenest laurel. Vive Henri Quatre, the Wilhelmus von

- At dubium est, habitare Deum sub pectore nostro ?
In cælumque redire animas, cæloque venire ?
Utque sit ex omni constructus corpore mundus,
Ætheris atque ignis sumri, terræque, marisque,
Spiritum et in toto rapidum qui jussa," &c.

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