Billeder på siden
PDF
ePub

HUDIBRAS.

HUDIBRAS CONSULTS THE LAWYER.

QUOTH he, “ There is one Sidrophel Whom I have cudgelled "_"Very well." “And now he brags t' have beaten me”— “Better, and better still," quoth he; “And vows to stick me to a wall, Where'er he meets me”-“Best of all!" “ 'Tis true the knave has taken 's oath That I robbed him "__"Well done, in troth " When h' has confessed he stole my cloak, And picked my fob, and what he took; Which was the cause that made me bang him, And take my goods again ”—“Marry, hang him.” “Now, whether I should beforehand, Swear he robbed me?"__"I understand "-“Or, if 'tis better to indict, And bring him to his trial?”—“Right”-. "Prevent what he designs to do, And swear for th' state against him?”—“True". "Or whether he that is defendant, In this case, kas the better end on't; Who, putting in a new cross-bill, May traverse the action?”—“Better still.” “Then there's a lady too.”—“Ay, marry" “That's easily proved accessory; A widow, who, by solemn vows, Contracted to me for my spouse, Combined with him to break her word, And has abetted all ”_-“Good Lord!” “Suborned th' aforesaid Sidrophel To tamper with the devil of hell,

SAMUEL BUTLER.

Who put m' into a horrid fear, Fear of my life”—“Make that appear". “ Made an assault with fiends and men Upon my body”—“Good again ”“And kept me in a deadly fright, And false imprisonment, all night. Meanwhile they robbed me, and my horse, And stole my saddle”_"Worse and worse “And made me mount upon the bare ridge, T'avoid a wretcheder miscarriage."

“Sir," quoth the lawyer, “not to flatter ye, You have as good and fair a battery As heart can wish, and need not shame The proudest man alive to claim: For if th' have used you as you say, Marry, quoth I, God give you joy; I would it were my case, I'd give More than I'll say, or you 'll believe : I would so trounce her, and her purse, I'd make her kneel for better or worse; For matrimony, and hanging here, Both go by destiny so clear, That you as sure may pick and choose, As cross I win, and pile you lose.'

[graphic]
[graphic][merged small][merged small][merged small]

SURE there are poets which did never dream
Upon Parnassus, nor did taste the stream
Of Helicon ; we therefore may suppose
Those made not poets, but the poets those.
And as courts make not kings, but kings the court,
So where the Muses and their train resort,
Parnassus stands; if I can be to thee
A poet, thou Parnassus art to me.

SIR JOIN DENHAM.

My eye descending from the Hill, surveys
Where Thames among the wanton valleys strays.
Thames! the most loved of all the Ocean's sons
By his old sire, to his embraces runs,
Hasting to pay his tribute to the sea,
Like mortal life to meet eternity.
Though with those streams he no resemblance hold
Whose foam is amber, and their gravel gold;
His genuine and less guilty wealth t' explore,
Search not his bottom, but survey his shore;
O’er which he kindly spreads his spacious wing,
And hatches plenty for th' ensuing spring;
Nor then destroys it with too fond a stay,
Like mothers which their infants overlay ;
Nor with a sudden and impetuous wave,
Like profuse kings, resumes the wealth he gave.
No unexpected inundations spoil
The mower's hopes, nor mock the ploughman's toil ;
But godlike his unwearied bounty flows;
First loves to do, then loves the good he does.
Nor are his blessings to his banks confined,
But free, and common, as the sea or wind ;
When he, to boast or to disperse his stores,
Full of the tributes of his grateful shores,
Visits the world, and in his flying towers
Brings home to us, and makes both Indies ours;
Finds wealth where 'tis, bestows it where it wants,
Cities in deserts, woods in cities plants.
So that to us no thing, no place is strange,
While his fair bosom is the world's exchange.
Oh could I flow like thee, and make thy stream
My great example, as it is my theme!
Though deep yet clear, though gentle yet not dull;
Strong without rage, without o'erflowing full.

[graphic][merged small][merged small][merged small]

TELL me not, sweet! I am unkind,

That from the nunnery Of thy chaste breast, and quiet mind,

To war and arms I fly.

True, a new mistress now I chase,

The first foe in the field; And, with a stronger faith, embrace

A sword, a horse, a shield.

Yet this inconstancy is such

As you, too, shall adore; I could not love thee, dear! so much,

Loved I not honour more.

TO ALTHEA, FROM PRISON.

When Love, with unconfined wings,

Hovers within my gates, And my divine Althea brings

To whisper at the grates;

« ForrigeFortsæt »