Poems of Places Oceana 1 V.; England 4; Scotland 3 V: Iceland, Switzerland, Greece, Russia, Asia, 3 America 5, Bind 18

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Side viii - Then off there flung in smiling joy, And held himself erect By just his horse's mane, a boy: You hardly could suspect — (So tight he kept his lips compressed, Scarce any blood came through) You looked twice ere you saw his breast Was all but shot in two.
Side vii - You know, we French stormed Ratisbon : A mile or so away On a little mound, Napoleon Stood on our storming-day ; With neck out-thrust, you fancy how, Legs wide, arms locked behind, As if to balance the prone brow Oppressive with its mind. ii Just as perhaps he mused " My plans " That soar, to earth may fall, " Let once my army-leader Lannes
Side 13 - Away with these ! true Wisdom's world will be Within its own creation, or in thine, Maternal Nature ! for who teems like thee, Thus on the banks of thy majestic Rhine ? There Harold gazes on a work divine, A blending of all beauties ; streams and dells, Fruit, foliage, crag, wood, cornfield, mountain, vine, And chiefless castles breathing stern farewells From gray but leafy walls, where Ruin greenly dwells.
Side 14 - But they who fought are in a bloody shroud, And those which waved are shredless dust ere now, And the bleak battlements shall bear no future blow.
Side 168 - WERTHER had a love for Charlotte Such as words could never utter ; Would you know how first he met her? She was cutting bread and butter. Charlotte was a married lady, And a moral man was Werther, And for all the wealth of Indies, Would do nothing for to hurt her. So he sighed and pined and ogled, And his passion boiled and bubbled, Till he blew his silly brains out, And no more was by it troubled. _*• Charlotte, having seen his body Borne before her on a shutter, Like a well-conducted person,...
Side 153 - Wiirtzburg's minster towers. And he gave the monks his treasures, Gave them all with this behest : They should feed the birds at noontide Daily on his place of rest; Saying, " From these wandering minstrels I have learned the art of song; Let me now repay the lessons They have taught so well and long.
Side viii - Emperor, by God's grace We've got you Ratisbon! The Marshal's in the market-place, And you'll be there anon To see your flag-bird flap his vans Where I, to heart's desire, Perched him!
Side 89 - Then," said the stranger, cheerily, " be it so. What Hell may be I know not ; this I know, — I cannot lose the presence of the Lord : One arm, Humility, takes hold upon His dear Humanity ; the other, Love, Clasps his Divinity. So where 1 go He goes ; and better fire-walled Hell with Him Than golden-gated Paradise without.
Side 107 - ANNIE of Tharaw, my true love of old, She is my life, and my goods, and my gold. Annie of Tharaw, her heart once again To me has surrendered in joy and in pain.
Side 215 - THE Wildgrave winds his bugle horn, To horse, to horse ! halloo, halloo ! His fiery courser snuffs the morn, And thronging serfs their lord pursue. The eager pack, from couples freed, Dash through the bush, the brier, the brake ; While answering hound, and horn, and steed, The mountain echoes startling wake. The beams of God's own hallow'd day Had painted yonder spire with gold, And, calling sinful man to pray, Loud, long, and deep the bell had...

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