Summer Months Among the Alps: With the Ascent of Monte Rosa

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Longman, Brown, Green, Longmans & Roberts, 1857 - 312 sider
 

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Side 34 - Breathing like one that hath a weary dream. Full-faced above the valley stood the moon ; And like a downward smoke, the slender stream Along the cliff to fall and pause and fall did seem. A land of streams ! some, like a downward smoke, Slow-dropping veils of thinnest lawn, did go ; And some through wavering lights and shadows broke, Rolling a slumbrous sheet of foam below.
Side 34 - In the afternoon they came unto a land In which it seemed always afternoon. All round the coast the languid air did swoon. Breathing like one that hath a weary dream. Full-faced above the valley stood the moon; And, like a downward smoke, the slender stream Along the cliff to fall and pause and fall did seem. A land of streams! some, like a downward smoke. Slow-dropping veils of thinnest lawn, did go; And some thro' wavering lights and shadows broke, Rolling a slumbrous sheet of foam below.
Side 42 - But it needs only a slight exaggeration to prove the old adage that there is only one step from the sublime to the ridiculous.
Side 121 - The whole of the ridge was exceedingly narrow, and the fall on each side desperately steep, but the ice in some of these intervals between the masses of rock assumed the form of a mere sharp edge, almost like a knife ; these places, though not. more than three or four short paces in length, looked uncommonly awkward; but, like the sword leading true believers to the gates of Paradise, they must needs be passed before we could attain to the summit of our ambition. These were in one or two places so...
Side 143 - They that stand high have many blasts to shake them, And when they fall they dash themselves to pieces ; — King Richard III.
Side 20 - ... discouraged : no one can fail to be completely recompensee for his fatigue, when he sees, for the first time, the monarch of the Oberland, the tremendous Finsteraarhorn. A moment before all was dulness, but a pas further has placed us on the summit of the Furka ; and exactly in front of us, at a hopow of only fifteen miles, this magnificent mountain lifts its snow-wreathed precipices into the deep blue sky. The inferior mountains on each side of Dead Mans Lake.
Side 119 - HinchlifF, himself one of these later travellers, ' that the best mountain guides look with great suspicion upon everybody except the English and their own countrymen in a mountaineering point of view: they distrust them from the beginning, and always seem maliciously glad when the grounds of their contempt are justified by the subsequent collapse of the luckless foreigner. They seldom take any trouble to cheer his fainting spirits, or offer him any assistance: and take delight in speaking of a difficult...
Side 208 - ... other nation ; a distinction to which the beauty of his person and the winning grace of his deportment gave peculiar lustre. It is at this period of his popularity and promise that he is depicted, with his brother-in-law, Lord Russell, by the unrivalled pencil of Vandyck, in a painting at Althorp, which can never be forgotten by those who have once seen it.* The retired life which his father, after his liberation, found it desirable to lead, proved of eminent advantage to Lord Digby ; for, finding...
Side x - ... be prolonged. It is not in general relieved by remedies which act speedily and severely, but by those which raise the standard of health, relieve complications, such as pain and sleeplessness, which may be distressing the patient, and the doses of which we can raise when it is thought fit to do so. At the same time I think it only right to say, that my observations have not been extensive enough to warrant me in giving an opinion. (g.) Bromide of Potassium. — For some years past I have used...
Side 221 - Were they all equally excellent, this would not be a great hardship, but the contrary is the fact ; and none grumble at the system so much as the really first-rate guides, of whom there are plenty at Chamonix, who find themselves put on a level with men scarcely more fit for their duties than so many railway porters.

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