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'Ερασμία ΠΕΛΕΙΑ,
Πόθεν πόθεν πέτασσαι;
Πόθεν μύρων τοσούτων
Πνέεις τε και ψεκάζεις;

Anacreon, Ode IX.

SH499

1442

TO THE READER.

Sir,

THE

THE book I here present to you was put into

the Printer's hands for the entertainment of a few Gentlemen Fishers; and I hope you take a pleasure in the harmless recreation of Angling, otherwise I may not hope you will overlook its defects. I heartily wish it were a more worthy tribute to the memory of those best masters of our art, Mr. Izaak Walton, and Mr. Charles Cotton :

ALAS, THAT THEY ARE DEAD!! But I beseech you to be civil, and moderate in

your censures ; for I undertook those pleasant walks, to which I here invite you, by the banks of the Dove (now ten years are past) to unbend my mind from some serious cares. And that I may not detain you from the perufal, I have only this

further to desire, that we may all have a south wind when we go a-fishing, -and be bleft with a virtuous cheerful spirit, a peaceful conscience, and at last eternal rejoicings in the kingdom of angels.

Your loving friend

and humble servant,

[merged small][merged small][graphic][subsumed]

THE RIVER DOVE;

WITH SOME QUIET THOUGHTS ON THE

HAPPY PRACTICE OF ANGLING.

CHAPTER I.

A Meeting at Derby, between an Angler

and a Painter.

Painter.

[graphic]

1 ELCOME, Mr. Gentleman An

gler : welcome to Derby.

Angler. Good morrow, brother, I am glad to see

you

look so cheering and courteous; for I must confess I am later than our fix't appointment.

Painter. Sir, now I possess you, I'm too glad-hearted to chide your lagging: yet, to say the truth, I expected you this hour agone ; for methought your sprightful anglers were apt to

B

prevent the fun's rising on a delicate May morning.

Angler. Give me your pardon this turn, and doubt not to find me stirring with the lark every day that you and I purpose to walk in each other's company by the banks of the Dove.

Painter. My pardon you shall have the more willingly, if you fail not a traveller's good stomach for breakfast.

Angler. You may trust me. I am as keenly set as a moss trooper.

Painter. I am glad to hear it, for I have told the civil hostess to treat us well.

Angler. You are worthy to be a brother of the angle; and this I am resolved you shall be when we are come to the river that I love so well :--but let us see what we may have for our breakfast, and fall to it merrily.

Painter. Here it is, and all of the best ; so let us say grace, and begin.

Angler. With all my heart ;-—and that will give it a relish. Painter. How now, brave Sir!

brave Sir! What say

you !

Angler. By pick and pie 'tis all excellent. When I am Lord Great Chamberlain you shall be my caterer. Come, Sir, for a glass of

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