The Works of the English Poets: With Prefaces, Biographical and Critical, Bind 29–31

Forsideomslag
Samuel Johnson
C. Bathurst, 1779
 

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Side 52 - Then I looked on all the works that my hands had wrought, and on the labour that I had laboured to do : and behold, all was vanity and vexation of spirit, and there was no profit under the sun.
Side 78 - Be to her virtues very kind; Be to her faults a little blind; Let all her ways be unconfin'd; And clap your padlock — on her mind.
Side 72 - ... tis his fancy to run, At night he declines on his Thetis's breast. So, when I am wearied with wandering all day, To thee, my delight, in the evening I come : No matter what beauties I saw in my way ; They were but my visits, but thou art my home ! Then finish, dear Chloe, this pastoral war, And let us like Horace and Lydia agree ; For thou art a girl as much brighter than her, As he was a poet sublimer than me.
Side 24 - He hath made every thing beautiful in his time: also he hath set the world in their heart, so that no man can find out the work that God maketh from the beginning to the end.
Side 52 - I made me great works; I builded me houses; I planted me vineyards: I made me gardens and orchards, and I planted trees in them of all kind of fruits: I made me pools of water, to water therewith the wood that bringeth forth trees...
Side 259 - ... tortures, and rejoice in fire; Or had I faith like that which Israel saw, When Moses gave them miracles and law; Yet...
Side 259 - Shadrach's zeal my glowing breast inspire, To weary tortures, and rejoice in fire; Or had I faith like that which Israel saw, When Moses gave them miracles and law...
Side 94 - Terrible, marches through the midday air, And scatters death; the arrow that by night Cuts the dank mist, and fatal wings its flight; The billowing snow, and violence of the...
Side 48 - To Me pertains not, She replies, To know or care where CUPID flies ; What are his Haunts, or which his Way ; Where He would dwell, or whither stray : Yet will I never set Thee free : For Harm was meant, and Harm to Me.
Side 49 - And through the woods uncertain chanc'd to stray. Apollo passing by beheld the maid ; And, Sister dear, bright Cynthia, turn, he said: The hunted hind lies close in yonder brake. Loud Cupid laugh'd, to see the god's mistake ; And laughing, cried, Learn better, great divine, To know thy kindred, and to honour mine.

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