A Letter to the Rt. Hon. Lord Grenville: Occasioned by Some Observations of His Lordship on the East India Company's Establishment for the Education of Their Civil Servants

Forsideomslag
J. Johnson and Company, 1813 - 38 sider
 

Hvad folk siger - Skriv en anmeldelse

Vi har ikke fundet nogen anmeldelser de normale steder.

Udvalgte sider

Andre udgaver - Se alle

Almindelige termer og sætninger

Populære passager

Side 6 - Company, therefore, can no longer be considered as the agents of a commercial concern. They are, in fact, the ministers and officers of a powerful sovereign ; they must now be viewed in that capacity, with reference, not to their nominal, but to their real occupations. They are required to discharge the...
Side 13 - ... higher classes of society; and those who offer themselves, and are found deficient, are remanded till another period of admission. 'The lectures of the different Professors in the College are given in a manner to make previous preparation necessary, and to encourage most effectually habits of industry and application. In their substance they embrace the important subjects of classical literature, the Oriental Languages, the Elements of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy, the Laws of England,...
Side 7 - ... the difficulty of every public charge. Their duties are those of statesmen in every other part of the world, with no other characteristic differences than the obstacles opposed by an unfavourable climate, by a foreign language, by the peculiar usages and laws of India, and by the manners of its inhabitants.
Side 10 - ... service cannot wisely or conscientiously be left to depend on the success of individual or accidental merit, struggling against the defects of established institutions. A due administration of our affairs can alone be secured by the constant 'effect of public institutions, operating in a regular and uninterrupted course upon the various characters, talents, and acquirements of individuals, The nature of our establishments should furnish fixed and systematic encouragement to animate, to facilitate,...
Side 6 - The civil servants of the English East India Company, therefore, can no longer be considered as the agents of a commercial concern. They are, in fact, the ministers and officers of a powerful sovereign...
Side 9 - The study and acquisition of the languages have, however, been extended in Bengal, and the general knowledge and qualifications of the civil servants have been improved. The proportion of the civil servants in Bengal, who have made a considerable progress towards the attainment of the qualifications requisite in their several stations, appears great, and even astonishing, when viewed with relation to the early disadvantages, embarrassments, and defects of the civil service.
Side 7 - India, and by the manners of its inhabitants. Their studies, the discipline of their education, their habits of life, their manners and morals should, therefore, be so ordered and regulated as to establish a just conformity between their personal consideration, and the dignity and importance of their public stations, and to maintain a sufficient correspondence between their qualifications and their duties.
Side 8 - ... civil servants of the East India Company, at any of the Presidencies, can now be deemed competent to discharge their arduous and comprehensive trusts in a manner correspondent to the interests and honour of the British name in India, or to the prosperity and happiness of our native subjects.
Side 14 - ... departments at the same time have proved that these fears were without foundation ; and that this variety has not only been useful to them in rendering a methodical arrangement of their hours of study more necessary, but has decidedly contributed to enlarge, invigorate, and mature their understandings, On all the important subjects above enumerated, examinations take place twice in the year, at the end of each term. These •examinations last above a fortnight, They are conducted upon the plan...
Side 13 - ... commencement of the institution it was feared by some persons that this variety would too much distract the attention of the students at the age of sixteen or seventeen, and prevent them from making a satisfactory progress in any department. But instances of distinguished success in many departments at the same time have proved that these fears were without foundation ; and that this variety has not only been useful to them in rendering a methodical arrangement of their hours of study more necessary,...

Bibliografiske oplysninger