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soldier. Agitated by the tenderest solicitude, faint with fatigue and loss of blood, and quite unable to support himself, he leaned over the corse of the fallen American War. ren had only entered into his twenty-third year, and added to a face, perhaps too feminine in its beauty, a figure of faultless symmetry. The wound in his breast had bled profusely, and the locket which he seemed to value so dearly glittered in a dark halo of blood.

Love did not want its association in the ideas of O'Hara, and, as he thought on the forlorn situation of his wife, he groaned in an agony of distress. General Howe at the moment rode up,-sprang from his horse, and embracing him, noticed his excessive agitation, and kindly entreated to know the cause.

Mahony, who had been looking at his master with great anxiety, perceiving that he was unable to reply, instantly exclaimed,

- Your honour sees that he is wounded, and, besides, he's frettin about her Ladyship; for when me and the master marched, her Honour's time was in, and they allowed she was

was

going to take labour. Och ! it's I would have been home to tell her, that the Captain was alive and merry, only the devil a leg I could put before the other.”

To summon an orderly with a steady horse to place O'Hara on his back, and offer the warmest wishes for his lady's safety, was all the work of an instant. The Captain rode quietly down the hill. The General gallopped forward to recall the advance, and Pat Mahony, after commending his master .and mistress to the especial care of Heaven, seated himself beside the body of the Republican Commander.

CON

Vol. I.

CHAPTER IV.

No useless coffin enclosed his breast,

Not in sheet or in shroud we bound him ;
He lay like a warrior taking his rest,
With his martial cloak around him.

Woolfe.

THOUSANDS were spectators of the engagement from the eminences of Boston, and its environs; and as O'Hara advanced into the town, his appearance attracted the undivided attention of the lookers on. The soldiers who were off duty, and citizens in detached groups, still occupied the walls from whence they had gazed on the field of battle, with equal anxiety, but dissimilar feelings.

The soldier, as he viewed the fluctuations of the conflict, trembled for the safety and honour of his companions in arms; and when victory and the hill was theirs, his triumph broke out in wild and unrestrained exultation : while the citizen, with keener sensibility, almost sank beneath the blow which threatened to crush, in its infant struggle for independence, the future liberties of a great and growing country. The Royalist with delight, the Republican with sorrow and devotion, still turned their eyes on the spot where the first martyrs of American freedom bled—though they failed to conquer; while O'Hara, cheered by the one, and coldly stared at by the other, interrogated by a multitude, to whose opposite questions it was impossible to reply, at last found his further progress barred by a brigade of soldiers' wives, who seemed obstinate in their determination to dispute the passage. In a state of great exhaustion, he was badly conditioned to free himself from this troublesome group, when his old servant, with heartfelt joy pictured in his countenance, rushed stoutly through the surrounding amazons, and led off the object of their curiosity. The Captain was anticipated in his inquiry for his lady, and listened with rapturous delight to the account of her safety, and the birth of an heir.

“She had a fine time, considering; and now

that his honour was returned with the life in him, all would be well.”

He shortly arrived at his friend's apartments -his servant assisted him to dismount; and, while the news of his safe return was cautiously conveyed to the invalid, his wounds were examined, and being found but trifling, were dressed by the Physician, who fortunately had not left the house; and soon the tears of as brave a soldier as any who bled on the heights of Bunker’s-Hill, fell in more than womanly affection on the cheek of his now happy wife.

There were few that day in Boston who did not share in the general distress. The Americans apprehended that the British troops would follow up their victory, and push forward without delay to their head-quarters at Cambridge; and probably an advance at this critical period would have fatally decided the cause of the Revolution—nothing could have saved their discomfitted army from total dispersion; while, with revived confidence, those who were well affected to the existing Government, would have been animated to have seconded them by their co-operation. But the loss of the victors

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