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The quantity of Gold and Silver deposited in market from the producing countries other than America, at the commencement of the present century.

SILVER.

GOLD.
Countries.

Value in

Value in Total value in francs. francs.

dollars. Europe,

11,701,000 4,478,000 $3,009.852 Turkey in Asia, 2,449,000

455,514 Russia in Asia,

4,821,000 2,239,000 1,313,160 Archipelago of Sunda, or

16,189,000 3,011,154 Malaysia, Afrique,

13,778,000 2,564,708

19,027,000 34,681,000 $10,354,388 The annual quantities of Gold and Silver delivered by different countries into the

general market.
SILVER.

GOLD.
Countries.

Value in

Value in Total value in francs. francs.

dollars. America,

136,480,000 51,434,000 $34,952,004 Europe,

26,667,000 4,478,000 5,792,970 Russia,

4,604,000 402,861,000 75,789,018 Africa,

13,778,000 2,564,708 Archipelago of Sunda, or

16,189,000 3,011,154 Malaysia, Various,

4,444,000 3,444,000 1,467,168

472,195,000 192,189,000 $123,577,052 The amount of specie imported into the United States 'from 1812 10 1847 (inclusive) is stated at $64,207,043, and the amount exported during the same period, $23,699,246.

MANUFACTURES. By the census of 1840, the amount of capital invested in manufactures in the United States, was $267,726,579, while the total value of the articles manufactured was $294,106,772. The following table of the value of the articles manufactured is gathered from the census returns. Manufacture of

Dollars.
Cotton

46,350,453
Wool

20,696 999 Leather

33, 134,403 Flas

322,205 Cordage

4,078,306 Mixed manufactures

6,515,503 Silk

119,814 Paper

6,153,092 Cast iron

8,607,090 Bar iron

13,806,310 Cannon and small arms

1,000,000 Hardware and cutlery

6,451,967 VOL. 1.—MAY, 1848.

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Machinery
Hats, caps, and bonnets
Glass
Earthenware
Drugs, medicines, &c.
Soap and candles
Musical instruments
Carriages and wagons
Ships
Furniture
Sugar refined
Confectionery
Gunpowder
Precious metals
Various metals
Domestic goods made in families
Non-enumerated articles

10,980,581
10,180,801
2,890.293
1,104,825
4,151,899
6,000,000

953,924
10,897,887
7,016,004
7,555,405
3,250,700
1,769,571
1,795,469
4,734,960
9,779,442
29,023.380
34,785,353

Total

$294,106,772 It is computed that there were employed in 1820, in the United States in manufactures, 349,506 persons, and in 1840, 791,749, while at the same time 3,719,951 were employed in agriculture, and 117,607 in commerce.

The returns of the census of 1840 of the productive industry of the country, were evidently imperfect. The present Secretary of the Treasury estimates the aggregate amount of products of the United States at $3,028,830,000. As an evidence of the increase since the census of 1840, we give the results of the labor and employment of capital in Massachusetts, the principal manufacturing state in the Union, for the year 1845.

By the census of 1840, the estimate of the domestic industry of Massachusetts, it was put down at $75,470,297. From a table published in 1845, we make the following extracts: Amount produced

$124,735,264

Capital invested

$59,145,767

Hands employed

152,767

The following are among the largest items in the table:

Boots and Shoes manufactured
Colton goods

do. Fishery, Whale

do. Cod, Mackerel, &c.
Woolen goods
Leather
Calicoes -
Candles. Oil, and Sperm
Bleaching and Coloring
Machinery
Rolling Mills, Nails, &c.
Paper
Hollow Ware, Casting, &c.
Cars, Carriages, &c.
Cabinet Ware
Stone, Building -

Value.
$14,799,140

12,193,449 10,371,167

1,184,137 8,877,478 3,836,657 4,779,817 3,613,796 2,166,000 2,022.648 2,738,300 1,750,273 1,280,141 1,343,576 1,476,679 1,065,599

Maine, New Hamp- {Taborers

Straw Bonnets, Hats, and Braid

1,649,496 Vessels, Shipping

1,172,147 Wood, Bark, Charcoal, &c.

1,088,656 Caitle (No. 276,549)

5,327,199 Grain

2,228,229 Hay

5,214,357 Horses (No. 65,181)

3,451,118 Sheep (No. 354,943)

558,284 Swine (No. 104,740)

917,435 Potatoes

1,309,030 Butter

1,116,709 In other parts of the Union, we have similar evidences of the progressive state and prosperity of the manufacturing interest. Under the head of cotton, we have mentioned the impulse which has been given to manufactures in the southern states. The subject is one of absorbing interest to the American people; and we have, therefore, in preparation from recent data, full tables of the present condition and progress of the manufactures, and of the results of the whole productive industry of the Union.

A Table of the average rate of Wages in the United States. It often happens that wages vary in different sections of the same state, and in large cities good laborers generally command $1 per day.

Per day.

Per month. mechanics

$1 shire, and Vermont,

62 cts.

$12 Massachusetts,* R. mechanics

1.25

26 Island, and Conn., y laborers

75

12 to $15 New York, mechanics

75 to 1.50

20 to 25 laborers

50 to 75.

10 to 12 mechanics New Jersey,

1 to $1.25. laborers

75 cts.

12 \

1 to $1.25.

20 Ohio,

50 cts.

10 Maryland and Dis- / mechanics

1 trict of Columbia, laborers (white), 50 to 75.

10 mechanics (white),

1 to $1.50.

25 to 40 Virginia, North and mechanics (cold), 1 to 1.25.

20, or 200 S. Carolina, Georgia,

per annum Kentucky, and Tennes laborers (white), 50 cts.

10 to 12 eee, laborers (col'd), 25 to 40.

5 to 10

or $60 to $100 per annum. Alabama and Missis. ( mechanics

1.50 to $2.

25 to $40 sippi, | laborers

25 to 50.

12 to 15 Louisiana, Florida, , mechanics $1.50 to $2.50.

30 to 50 and Arkansas, laborers

50

15 Indiana, Illinois, and mechanics

$1 to $1.50.

20 to 30 Michigan, laborers

50 to 75,

8 to 12 lowa, Wisconsin, mechanics

1.50 to $2. and Missouri, ( laborers

75 to $1.

10 to 15 * In Lowell, the male operatives are paid 80 to 88 cents a day, exclusive of board. The females earn from $3 to $4 a week,

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During the month of April 1848, the following announcement of the anticipated revenue has been made.

The receipts of the customs for the fiscal year were estimated by the secretary of the treasury to amount to $31,000,000, a sum which will certainly be realized, as $28,000,000 have already been collecied, and there yet remains iwo and onethird months of the fiscal year. The amount estimated to accrue from the sales of public lands, during the same period, was $3,300,000, of which $2,750,000 have been collected, and the large Miami sales coming off before the expiration

of the year.

England and France.
The New York Herald has recently made the following statements:-

The debts of these two countries amount in the aggregate to nearly five thousand millions of dollars, the interest on which annually amounts to about two hundred and fifty millions of dollars—a sum nearly as large as the aggregate indebtedness of every state in the American Union and of the general government. The annexed statement exhibits the aggregate indebtedness, and the annual receipts and expenditures at several periods:Finances of Great Britain-Income, Expenditures and Indebtedness.

Income. Expenditures. Indebtedness. 1836

£50,494,732 £48,787,639 £787,638,816 1843

50,071,000 50,030,000 795,130,240 1844

52,835,124 50,739,697 1845

53,060,354 49,742,712 1846

53,790,138 50,943,830 785,115,000 1847

51,250,000 54,596,000 In 1689, the public debt amounted to £664,263; in 1702, to £16,394,702; 1714, £54,145,373; 1763, £138,865,430; 1784, £219,851,628; 1817, £810,850,491. Since 1817, the debt has been largely reduced, and is now less than eight hundred millions of pounds sterling Since 1815, Great Britain has been at peace with the world, and the debt has been reduced about forty-five million pounds sterling

A statement, showing the present position of the public debt of France, the periodical increase in the amount, and the different rates of interest paid upon the debt :

Public Debt of France—1847.
Capital in Francs. Capital in Capital in

Sterling

Dollars. 5 Cents

2,910,000,000 115,294,000 576,470.000 4} per Cents

22,222,222

871,000 4,375,000 4 per Cents

550,000,000 21,569,000 107,845,000 3 per Cents

1,833,333,333 71,891,000 359,475,000

per

5,345,555,555 £209,629,000 $1,018,165,000 The next dividends which fall due will be those of the five per cents, on the 22d of March.

When Louis Philippe ascended the throne, the debt of France amounted to $860,000,000. Since 1830 the increase has been as follows:

per cent.

Date.
1830
1831
1832
1841
1814
1847

Increase of the Public Debt of France.
Amount in

Rate
Francs.
40.000.000

5
120,000,000

5 150,000,000

5 150,000,000

3 200,000,000

3 250,000,000

3

Contract
price.
102
84
98.50
78.52
8175
75.25

Total 910,000,000 This increase is equal to one hundred and eighty-two millions of dollars, in a period of seventeen years.

State Indebtedness. On the authority of a stock circular of Prime, Ward & Co., the following statement of the debts, revenue and expenditures of the several states was published in 1847. We do not vouch for its perfect accuracy. States. Accounts made

Nov. 30,

Debts.

Revenue. Expenditure. up to Massachu's January 1, 1817 6,000,000 518,528 504,317 New York Sept. 30, 1846 24,734,080 2,842,310 2,015,904 Penn'a

1846 40,789,877 3,529,057 3,529,264 Maryland Dec. 1, 1846 15,038,030 917,752 873,821 Virginia - October 1, 1846 7,384,793 808,807 735,040 S. Carolina Nov. 25, 1816 5,000,000 306,831 347,704 Georgia April 1,

1846 1,465,250 626,958 285,850 Alabama · January 1, 1846 13,646,078 274,246 287,951 Mississippi March 1, 1845 7,271,707 619,888 323,757 Louisiana Dec. 31, 1846 16,238,131 618,860 423,746 Tennessee October 31, 1846 3,957,356 305,119 245,074 Kentucky Dec. 1, 1846 4,596,026 352,405 165,002 Ohio . Nov. 15,

1846 19,246,002 2,081,384 2,038,027 Indiana

1846
13,100,000 293,861

69,136 Illinois

14,000,000 not known not known Missouri October 1, 1846 957,261 477,728 329,481 Michigan January 1, 1847 5,200,000 227,697 165,125 Arkansas October 1846 3,617,227 51,918 107,221 Florida · January 1, 1846 5,000,000 not known not known Texas

not known not known not known " The ten states not included in the above list, viz: Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Delaware, North Carolina, Jowa and Wisconsin, as also the District of Columbia, are without any public debt. Of the debt of Massachusetts, two-thirds ($4,000,000) was created by loan 10 the Western Railroad Company, by whom it is now proposed to be paid off. Against the debt of New York an annual sum is appropriated chiefly from the canal revenues, to the purposes of a sinking-fund, which is expected to extinguish the whole in 1869. Pennsylvania has now a small excess of income over expenditure, but not yet enough to commence a sinking-fund, although this is contemplated in another year.”

October 31,

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