The Devil's Dictionary

Forsideomslag
Wordsworth Editions, 1996 - 254 sider
19 Anmeldelser
Anmeldelserne verificeres ikke af Google, men Google tjekker indholdet og fjerner det, hvis det er falsk.
This dictionary aims to help users to find the most appropriate word to use on a wide range of occasions. It is designed in particular for students, those writing reports, letters and speeches, and crossword solvers, but is also useful as a general word reference. Special features include: an alphabetical A-Z listing; numbered senses for words with more than one meaning; British and American variants; and specially marked colloquial uses.

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Brugervurderinger

5 stjerner
7
4 stjerner
6
3 stjerner
4
2 stjerner
1
1 stjerne
1

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LibraryThing Review

Brugeranmeldelse  - et.carole - LibraryThing

If he wasn't dead, I would go to Mexico and look for Bierce. This year's junior research paper for English 11 was fun, because he was my topic. A lovely little book of definitions that I might not ... Læs hele anmeldelsen

LibraryThing Review

Brugeranmeldelse  - Juva - LibraryThing

A vintage collection of devilishly satirical definitions to common words. The perfect resource for the depraved wit seeking the perfect quotation. Læs hele anmeldelsen

Udvalgte sider

Indhold

Afsnit 1
9
Afsnit 2
11
Afsnit 3
27
Afsnit 4
36
Afsnit 5
56
Afsnit 6
71
Afsnit 7
84
Afsnit 8
100
Afsnit 15
176
Afsnit 16
178
Afsnit 17
184
Afsnit 18
200
Afsnit 19
202
Afsnit 20
217
Afsnit 21
235
Afsnit 22
243

Afsnit 9
112
Afsnit 10
125
Afsnit 11
146
Afsnit 12
149
Afsnit 13
152
Afsnit 14
164
Afsnit 23
245
Afsnit 24
246
Afsnit 25
251
Afsnit 26
252
Afsnit 27
253
Copyright

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Almindelige termer og sætninger

Om forfatteren (1996)

Ambrose Bierce was a brilliant, bitter, and cynical journalist. He is also the author of several collections of ironic epigrams and at least one powerful story, "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge." Bierce was born in Ohio, where he had an unhappy childhood. He served in the Union army during the Civil War. Following the war, he moved to San Francisco, where he worked as a columnist for the newspaper the Examiner, for which he wrote a number of satirical sketches. Bierce wrote a number of horror stories, some poetry, and countless essays. He is best known, however, for The Cynic's Word Book (1906), retitled The Devil's Dictionary in 1911, a collection of such cynical definitions as "Marriage: the state or condition of a community consisting of a master, a mistress, and two slaves, making in all, two." Bierce's own marriage ended in divorce, and his life ended mysteriously. In 1913, he went to Mexico and vanished, presumably killed in the Mexican revolution.

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