Elements of Mental Philosophy Enbracing the Two Departments of the Intellect and the Sensibilities, Bind 2

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Harper & Brothers, 1841
 

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Indhold

Of the beauty of straight and angular forms
46
Of square pyramidal and triangular forms
48
The variety of the sources of that beauty which is founded on forms illustrated from the different styles of architecture
49
Of the original or intrinsic beauty of colours
50
Further illustrations of the original beauty of colours
52
Of sounds considered as a source of beauty
54
Illustrations of the original beauty of sounds
55
Further instances of the original beauty of sounds
58
The permanency of musical power dependant on its being intrinsic
59
Of motion as an element of beauty
60
Explanations of the beauty of motion from Kaimes 38 Or intellectual and moral objects as a source of the beautiful
61
Of a distinct sense or faculty of beauty
63
ASSOCIATED BEAUTY 40 Associated beauty implies an antecedent or intrinsic beauty
64
Objects may become beautiful by association merely
65
Further illustrations of associated feelings
66
Instances of national associations
68
happiness
69
Of fitness considered as an element of associated beauty
70
Or utility as an element of associated beauty
71
Of proportion as an element of associated beauty
72
Relations of emotions of beauty to the fine arts
73
Differences of original susceptibility of this emotion
74
Objection to the doctrine of original beauty
75
5 Summary of views in regard to the beautiful
76
Of picturesque beauty
77
EMOTIONS OF SUBLIMITY 53 Connexion between beauty and sublimity
78
The occasions of the emotions of sublimity various
79
Great extent or expansion an occasion of sublimity 56 Great height an element or occasion of sublimity
80
Of depth in connexion with the sublime
81
Of colours in connexion with the sublime
82
Of sounds as furnishing an occasion of sublime emotions
83
Of motion in connexion with the sublime 61 Indications of power accompanied by emotions of the sublime
84
Of moral worth in connexion with sublimity
85
Sublime objects have some elements of beauty
86
Emotions of grandeur 65 Of the original or primary sublimity of objects
87
Considerations in proof of the original sublimity of objects
88
Influence of association on emotions of sublimity
89
Further illustrations of sublimity from association
90
NATURE OF INTELLECTUAL TASTE 69 Definition of taste and some of its characteristics
91
Distinguishable from mere quickness of feeling or sensibility
92
EMOTIONS OF THE LUDICROUS
97
Of the practical utility of feelings of the ludicrous
103
PART FIRST
109
INSTINCTS
119
Further instances of instincts in
125
Of the complex nature of the affections
175
Modifications of resentment Peevishness
182
165
188
Illustrations of the filial affection
194
Of the connexion between benevolence and rectitude
200
Other remarks in proof of the same doctrine
207
Of patriotism or love of country
213
THE BENEVOLENT AFFECTIONS LOVE TO THE SUPREME
220
The absence of this principle attended with an excessive and
226
Of the origin of secondary active principles
237
205
242
The objection noticed in connexion with the malevolent affections
243
Proofs of a moral nature from the manner of our intercourse with
250
211
251
Evidences of a moral nature even among Savage nations
258
pod from an 223
259
EMOTIONS OF MORAL APPROVAL AND DISAPPROVAL
264
Emotions of moral approval are called forth in connexion with
271
RELATION OF REASONING TO THE MORAL NATURE
272
Of the origin of emotions of moral beauty
280
Remarks in explanation of the moral sublime
286
Further proof from the conduct of
298
Feelings of obligation differ from those of mere approval and dis
304
Additional illustration of the same view of the subject
314
Mustration of the principle of the preceding section
320
Illustration of the fact that there are the remains of conscientious
326
The immutability of moral distinctions supported by the views
332
The immutability of moral distinctions thirdly from the opera
340
The doctrine further shown from the opinions which mankind
346
Of the proofs of this doctrine from the appeals which are made in
351
Of the discouragements attending a process of moral instruction
357
303
360
Further views on the influence of moral habits
363
DISORDERED AND ALIENATED ACTION OF THE APPETITES
369
Disordered action of imitativeness or the principle of imitation
376
SYMPATHETIC IMITATION
382
Other instances of this species of imitation
388
Of sudden and strong impulses of mind
393
Disordered action of the passion of fear
399
2
400
Of moral accountability in cases of natural or congenital moral
406
Casual association in connexion with objects and places
413
ORAL SIGNS OR SPEECH
431
22
443
CHARACTERISTICS OF LANGUAGES
446

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Side 98 - I may therefore conclude, that the passion of laughter is nothing else but sudden glory arising from some sudden conception of some eminency in ourselves, by comparison with the infirmity of others, or with our own formerly...
Side 82 - Come on, sir; here's the place: — stand still. — How fearful And dizzy 'tis, to cast one's eyes so low! The crows and choughs, that wing the midway air, Show scarce so gross as beetles : Half way down Hangs one that gathers samphire; dreadful trade! Methinks, he seems no bigger than his head: The fishermen, that walk upon the beach, Appear like mice; and yon...
Side 263 - For when the Gentiles, which have not the law, do by nature the things contained in the law, these, having not the law, are a law unto themselves ; which show the work of the law written in their hearts, their conscience also bearing witness, and their thoughts the mean while accusing or else excusing one another ;) in the day when God shall judge the secrets of men by Jesus Christ, according to my Gospel.
Side 83 - The voice of the Lord is upon the waters: the God of glory thundereth: the Lord is upon many waters.
Side 89 - AND I saw another mighty angel come down from heaven, clothed with a cloud : and a rainbow was upon his head, and his face was as it were the sun, and his feet as pillars of fire...
Side 100 - The sun had long since in the lap Of Thetis taken out his nap, And like a lobster boiled, the morn From black to red began to turn," The imagination modifies images, and gives unity to variety ; it sees all things in one, il piti nelV uno.
Side 83 - There went up a smoke out of his nostrils, and fire out of his mouth devoured : coals were kindled by it. He bowed the heavens also, and came down : and darkness was under his feet. And he rode upon a cherub, and did fly : yea, he did fly upon the wings of the wind. He made darkness his secret place ; his pavilion round about him were dark waters and thick clouds of the skies.
Side 285 - The sun shall be no more thy light by day, neither for brightness shall the moon give light unto thee; but the Lord shall be unto thee an everlasting light, and thy God thy glory. Thy sun shall no more go down, neither shall thy moon withdraw itself: for the Lord shall be thine everlasting light, and the days of thy mourning shall be ended.
Side 352 - What could have been done more to my vineyard, That I have not done in it? Wherefore, when I looked that it should bring forth grapes, Brought it forth wild grapes?

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