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We love our country well, but we have another country that we love still better.

“ I'm but a stranger here,

Heaven is my home.” I hope the reason that you love your Missionary Newspaper is because it gives you news of the kingdom of Jesus. If so, I am sure you often pray, “ Thy kingdom come,” and you pray for the soldiers tooấthe brave Missionaries who are gone away to labour and fight until their Captain shall call them home.

Are there any of the readers of this Paper who, when the year began, were rebels against this gracious King but who have since then come to His footstool with mourning and with prayer, and who have been washed in the blood of the Lamb? Oh, then, eighteen hundred and fifty-four has been to them a happy year, the golden year of their lives.

May God grant to all who read this Paper that they may be admitted into the everlasting kingdom of His dear Son earnestly prays their sincere friend,

THE EDITOR.

December 1854.

INDEX.

35

Page

Page
A Happy New Year,

5 Missions in Burmah-
A Living Coffin,
24 No. 1. Early Days,

53
A Living Sacrifice,

39
2. Dr Judson in Prison,

61
A Morning Thought,

8
3. The Starved Lion,

65
A Sailor's Testimony,

55 Missions to the Indians in Guiana
Am I my Brother's Keeper ?
88 No. 1. The Moravians,

14
Bless, and Curse Not,

71

2. The Solitary Missionary, 20
Chinese Hymn for Children,

80

3. Mr Youd at Bartica Grove, 29
Confessions of an Idolater,

77

4. Mr Bernau,
Correspondence,

70, 88
5. The Schools,

46
Do you Ever Try?

40
6. Indian Scholars,

51
Good News from old Calabar,

22

7. A Missionary Journey, 57
Heathenism Two Thousand Years Ago, 76 8. Travelling,

67
He said his Prayers, but never Prayed, 56 9. Indian Liberality,

74
How Christ Counts,

86
10. Mr Youd,

81
How to Give,

70
11. Conclusion,

92
be Dead before next Year, 96 Missions in West Africa. Ibadan. 68
Little Rajee,
39 More Precious than Gold,

73
Little Things and Little People, 88 Mr Crowther, the Slave Missionary, 25
Love to God's House,
32 Never Give Up,

79

Parrot Worship. Old Calabar, 8
Missionary Evenings

Poetry,
No. 1. Madagascar,
1 Little Things,

8
2. China,
9 Little Words,

88
3. The Missionary Ship, 17 Missionary Hymn,

98
4. The Sikhs,
27 Nothing Useless,

32
5. Russian Worship,
33 O Happy Day,

80
6. Bengal,
44 Oh, to save a Soul alive,

57
7. Old Calabar,
84 Sowing and Reaping,

24
8. Polynesia,
90 The Saviour's Love,

60

I may

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Page
15

7
71
56
13

72

.

Page
True Prayer,

24 The Ragged Missionary,
What to pray for,

16 The Rescue,
Popery in Ireland,

78 The Shipwreck and the Bible,
Send to my Father's House, 16 The Sinner and the Tempter,
She hath done what she could, 49 Thou God seest me,
Something to do,

56 Too Late,
Tell me again,

24 What are you doing for China ?
The Arab and the Pearls,

71 | What the Gospel has done for the
The Indian Mother and her Dying

Sandwich Islands,
Boy,

60 What God do they worship?
The Lapland Missionary, 95 | Where there is a Will, there is a
The Little Shovel,

64 Way,
The Parable of the Chain, 89 | Why did you not come before ?
The Puzzled Philosopher, 60 You may save a Soul,

7

41
64

38
38
23

ILLUSTRATIONS.
FRONTISPIECE.
The Madagascar Convert visiting the Missionaries,
The Chinese breaking Popish Images,
The “ John Williams” at Erramanga,
Mr Crowther and the King of Ketu,
A Russian Priest,
A Waterfall in the Sandwich Islands,
The Lighthouse,
Eric preaching to his Countrymen,
The Starved Lion,
Lake Winnipeg,
A Congregation of Macusie Indians,
A Scene on the Ganges,

1
9
17
25
33
41
49
57
65
73
81
89

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“WINTER evenings are come again, little girl, “ I wish it was always sumdull, dark winter evenings,” exclaimed mer; look Mary, doesn't everything little Jessie Campbell, in rather a com- look dismal? Why the trees look as if plaining tone, as she stood at the win- | they had got cobwebs on them. Mary, dow watching the drip, drip of the rain. don't

you

wish that winter was gone?” "I don't like winter,” continued the “No, indeed I do not,” answered her

January 1854.

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sister ; "Ithink we should miss a great | elephants and tigers ; I have told you deal of pleasure if we had no winter nearly all that I know myself about Jugevenings; don't you remember last year gernaut, and his brothers and sisters, what nice stories father used to tell us, and the river Ganges, and the great and you were sorry to go to bed, the city of Calcutta, and" evenings passed so quickly ? Come, Never mind father,” interrupted you must not scold poor old winter; Gilbert, “ let us hear them again, we you know it is God that sends the cold are not a bit tired of them; please to weather, and the rain and the snow, tell us something about the missionand indeed we should not do very well aries.” without them, I ncy."

“O yes, do, do !” cried all three at “I know that,” said Jessie, “but once ; "and please father begin now," I can't help feeling dull when every- added Jessie. thing out of doors looks so dismal." “ Well children,” said Mr Camp

Then, do not look out of. doors ; bell, “ I'll tell you what I will do-inlet us close the shutters and stir up the stead of relating to you what I saw in fire: there now, that is pleasant, and India, which I am sure you know all father will be home soon.

about, I will tell you what is going on Oh,” said Jessie, “and then we will now among the heathen in different ask him to tell us some stories after countries. Will that do ?” tea, as he used to do; I wonder if he “ That will be capital,” said Gilbert, has any new ones to tell us about what " it will be like having a missionary he saw when he was in India.”

meeting of our own here in the par" I don't know," said Mary, I am sure he can tell us something we “So it will,” said Mary, “but father shall like to hear."

will be the only speaker. Well, I do not much care what it is “ No, no," cried Jessie, “ you know about ; I always like father's stories.” we shall want to ask questions, so we

As soon as tea was over,Jessie slipped shall speak too sometimes.” down from her chair and whispered Her father laughingly told her that something to her brother Gilbert. Her he should be very happy to listen to father saw, from the glances at him, her speeches, and to answer them too. and the loud whispering of this being But first, said he, I want you to bring Friday evening, when there are no me the large map of the world, that lessons to be learned,” that there was you may point out the countries that I some plan in contemplation of which shall speak of. he was the subject, and said, “ Well The three children were soon seated Jessie, what is it ?”

at the table “ as still as mice,” as Jessie A story, father, please tell us a remarked, and prepared to listen very story,” cried the children all together. attentively.

Well, but,” said Mr Campbell, “ I Perhaps our young readers would have no more stories about lions and like to take out their map of the world

66 but

lour."

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