Miscellaneous Works of the Late Philip Dormer Stanhope, Earl of Chesterfield: Consisting of Letters to His Friends, Never Before Printed, and Various Other Articles : to which are Prefixed, Memoirs of His Life, Tending to Illustrate the Civil, Literary, and Political History of His Time, Bind 2

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Side 330 - Wit, my Lords, is a sort of property; it is the property of those who have it, and too often the only property they have to depend on. It is indeed but a precarious dependence. Thank God! we, my Lords, have a dependence of another kind...
Side 320 - I fear we have more reason to complain of bad measures in our polity, and a general decay of virtue and morality among the people. In public, as well as private life, the only way to prevent being ridiculed or censured, is to avoid all ridiculous or wicked measures, and to pursue such only as are virtuous and worthy.
Side 388 - At other times he was a cheerful and agreeable companion ; but, conscious that he was not always so, he avoided company too much, and was too often alone, giving way to a train of gloomy reflections. His constitution, which was never robust, broke rapidly at the latter end of his life.
Side 331 - Gentleman will be exposed to who writes any thing for the Stage, must certainly prevent every Man of a generous and free Spirit from attempting any Thing in that Way; and as the Stage has always been the proper Channel for Wit and Humour, therefore, my Lords, when I...
Side 267 - My friend was going on, and to say the truth, growing dull, when I took the liberty of interrupting him, by acknowledging that the cogency of his arguments, and the...
Side 346 - Lords, the law is not to be condemned for its inefficacy, since it only fails by the defect of those who are to direct its operations. The best and most important laws will contribute very little to the security or happiness of a people, if no judges of integrity and spirit can be found among them.
Side 307 - ... for keeping : every age has degenerated ; and, from the fall of the first man, my unfortunate ancestor, our species has been tumbling on, century by century, from bad to worse, for about six thousand years. Considering this progressive state of deterioration, it is a very great mercy that things are no worse with us at present ; since, geometrically speaking, the human ought by this time to have sunk infinitely below the brute and the vegetable species, which...
Side 283 - Townly observed with concern and impatience, that people of fashion now came intolerably late, and in a glut at once, which laid the lady of the house under great difficulties to make the parties properly. That, no doubt...
Side 263 - The fact will appear so incredible, that it will certainly be believed; the only difficulty will be how to account for it ; and that, as it commonly does, will engross the attention of the learned.
Side 329 - Court, which is only a most just and a most necessary satire upon the fashionable vices and follies of the Court. Courtiers, my Lords, are too polite to reprove one another ; the only place where they can meet with any just reproof, is a free though not a licentious stage...

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