On the Principles of Political Economy, and Taxation

Forsideomslag
John Murray, 1821 - 538 sider

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Indhold

I
3
II
55
III
78
IV
82
V
88
VI
109
VII
133
VIII
164
XVIII
283
XIX
302
XX
309
XXII
322
XXIV
340
XXV
356
XXVI
382
XXVIII
390

IX
171
XI
193
XII
197
XIII
203
XIV
216
XV
228
XVI
233
XVII
247
XXIX
405
XXX
417
XXXII
423
XXXIV
450
XXXV
459
XXXVI
462
XXXVII
468
XXXVIII
485

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Populære passager

Side 346 - What is prudence in the conduct of every private family, can scarce be folly in that of a great kingdom. If a foreign country can supply us with a commodity cheaper than we ourselves can make it, better buy it of them with some part of the produce of our own industry, employed in a way in which we have some advantage.
Side 55 - Rent is that portion of the produce of the earth which is paid to the landlord for the use of the original and indestructible powers of the soil.
Side 97 - The friends of humanity cannot but wish that in all countries the labouring classes should have a taste for comforts and enjoyments, and that they should be stimulated by all legal means in their exertions to procure them. There cannot be a better security against a superabundant population.
Side 202 - The tax which each individual is bound to pay ought to be certain, and not arbitrary. The time of payment, the manner of payment, the quantity to be paid, ought all to be clear and plain to the contributor, and to every other person.
Side 59 - It is only, then, because land is not unlimited in quantity and uniform in quality, and because, in the progress of population, land of an inferior quality, or less advantageously situated, is called into cultivation, that rent is ever paid for the use of it.
Side 143 - Gold and silver having been chosen for the general medium of circulation, they are, by the competition of commerce, distributed in such proportions amongst the different countries of the world, as to accommodate themselves to the natural traffic which would take place if no such metals existed, and the trade between countries were purely a trade of barter.
Side 460 - The chapter opens by reaffirming that it is the cost of production which must ultimately regulate the price of commodities, and not, as has been often said, the proportion between the supply and demand: the proportion between supply and demand may, indeed, for a time, affect the market value of a commodity, until it is supplied in greater or less abundance, according as the demand may have increased or diminished, but this effect will be only of temporary duration.
Side 3 - The things which have the greatest value in use have frequently little or no value in exchange; and, on the contrary, those which have the greatest value in exchange have frequently little or no value in use.
Side 327 - Capital is that part of the wealth of a country which is employed in production, and consists of food, clothing, tools, raw materials, machinery, etc., necessary to give effect to labour.
Side 5 - The real price of everything, what everything really costs to the man who wants to acquire it, is the toil and trouble of acquiring it.

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