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that he will open yet further the secrets that lie in the book of fate. - 264. Mores conveyed to a Roman many of the notions which political institutions and a social system convey to us. Viris for (his) people. — 265. Viderit. Gr. 522. I. A. & S. 145. VI. ; 263. 4 (1). Tertia aestas ... ternaque hiberna, triginta magnos orbes (v. 269), ter centum annos (v. 272), imperium sine fine (v. 279) ; i. e. Aeneas is to reign three years after his victory over Turnus and the Rutulians, Ascanius thirty, the Alban kings three hundred, but to the empire of Rome no limit is fixed. — 266. Terna. Gr. 174. 2. 3). A. & S. 120. 4 (a). Rutulis ... subactis = post Rutulos subactos : probably a dat., by a Greek construction, depending upon transierint ; though it may very well be the abl. absol. — 267. At marks the transition from hic, v. 261, to Ascanius. Ascanius; the son of Ae. neas and Creusa. Iulo. Gr. 387. 1. A. & S. 204, R. 8 (a). The son of Aeneas was first called Euryleon ; in the flight from Troy he received the name of Ascanius; but he was never called Tulus except by the Roman poets in compliment to the Caesars, who belonged to the gens Frilia, and who traced their origin to Ascanius. — 268. Dum regno while the Trojan state stood with power unbroken. Gr. 414 and 3. A. & S. 247 and 2 Cf. II. 88. – 269. Volvendis volgentibus. Cf. volventibus annis, v. 234, volvenda dies, IX. 7. A. & S. 274, R. 9. Mensibus. Gr. 428. A. & S. 211, R. 6. Orbes. Cf. annuus orbis, v. 46. — 270. Imperio. Gr. 419. 2. A. & S. 249. I. – 271. Longam. It was called Longa, from its stretching in a long line down the Mons Albanus towards the lake (Lacus Albanus). Multa vi muniet =shall build and fortify with great power and might. — 272. Jam= at this point in the series of events ; contrasting Alba and its long-lived dynasty with the preceding members of the series. The force of hic jam may be given by the phrase and here. — 273. Hectorea Trojana ; Hector being the bravest of the Trojans. Regina. Gr. 363. A. & S. 204. Sacerdos; i. e. of Vesta. — 274. Geminam ... prolem; i. e. Romulus and Remus. Partu dabit = pariet. Gr. 414 and 3. A. & S. 247 and 2. Tia of Trojan descent; an epithet applied by the poets to Rea Silvia, the daughter of Numitor, king of Alba. See also on Hor. C. I. 2. 17. - 275. Tegmine. Gr. 414 and 2. A. &. S. 247 and 1. The allusion is to the myth that the infants Romulus and Remus were nourished by a she-wolf. It seems better with Forb. to understand the text of his habitually wearing a wolf's skin, in grateful and joyous remembrance of the fostering care of that animal. — 276. 'Excipiet gentem. See on G. II. 345. The notion here is that of succession. Mavortia = of Mars. This word may point at once to Romulus as the son of Mars or Mayors, the worship of Mars at Rome, and the martial character of the nation. - 278. Metas refers

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to the bounds of the empire (rerum), tempora to its duration. — 279. Quin nay, even. — 280. Metu rather expresses the alarm which Juno feels at the course of destiny (id metuens, v. 23) than the terror which she spreads through the universe. The latter view, however, is the one taken by most of the commentators. Gr. 414 and 2. A. & S. 247 and 1. Fatigat; i. e. keeps earth, air, and sea astir, by constantly traversing them and exciting their powers. — 281. In me. lius referet shall change for the better, amend. — 282. Rerum

of the world. Togatam. The toga was the peculiar distinction of the Romans, who were thence called togati or gens togata. It was forbidden alike to exiles and to foreigners. — 283. Sic placitum. Jupiter is speaking of destiny. Lustris; strictly a period of five years, here used for time or ages in general. Gr. 431. A. & S. 257.

- 284. Assaraci. Assaracus is the ancestor through whom Aeneas was related to the royal house of Troy, being the son of Tros and grandfather of Anchises. Cf. VI. 838. Phthia, a city of Thessaly and the native place of Achilles, Mycenae, a city of Argolis, and of which Agamemnon was king, and Argos (v. 24, note), which was ruled by Diomedes, are here put comprehensively for the whole of Greece, which Jupiter assures Venus shall become subject to Roman sway. — 285. Argis. Gr. 131. 3 ; 421. II. A. & S. 92. 4; 254 - 286. Origine. Gr. 428. A. & S. 211, R. 6. Caesar; ie. Augustus, not Julius Caesar, the dictator, who could hardly be said to be laden with the spoils of the East, v. 289. - 287. Qui termi. net; i. e. destined to bound. Gr. 500 and 1. A. & S. 264. 5.288. Julius. He was adopted by Julius Caesar, who was his uncle by blood, and therefore by the law adoption received the gentile name Julius, which connected him with Iulus. - 289. Coelo. Cf. Hor. C. III. 3. 11, 12. Gr. 422. 'A. & S. 254, R. 3. Spoliis – onustum. Cf. G. II. 171; IV. 560 ; A. VI. 792 foll. ; Hor. C. I. 12, 55, etc. — 290. Secura

free from anxiety, alarm. Vocabi. tur ... votis. Cf. E. I. 44 ; G. I. 42. Hic quoque; i. e, as well as Aeneas, v. 259. — 291. Aspera bellis ; i. e. the iron age will under the reign of Augustus pass into the golden. Cf. E. IV. 8; A. VI. 793. - 292. Cana = prisca, antiqua ; i. e. virtue stern as was that of the ancients. Cf. Hor. Car. Sec. 57. Fides – Quirinus. These four deities are chosen as typical of the primitive and golden age of Rome, Vesta has been mentioned before in a similar connection, G. I. 498, Romulus and Remus, G. II. 533. Quirinus. See on Romule, G. I. 498. – 293. Dirae — artis = grim with closely. welded plates of iron. See on v. 61. Gr. 414 and 2. A. & S. 247 and ... - 294. Belli; a personification, meaning the divinity who presides

The allusion is to the closing of the temple of Janus, B. C. 29, and the existence of peace over the whole Roman world. This

over war.

temple, which was always kept open in time of war, but closed during peace, is said to have been shut but four times prior to the Christian era Cf. Hor. C. IV. 15. 9. Impius; on account of the civil wars. See on G. I. 511. – 296. Nodis = catenis. 297. Maia genitum; i.e. Hermes or Mercurius, the son of Jupiter and Maia, the daughter of Atlas. He was the messenger of the gods. Gr. 425 and 3. 1). A. & S. 246. Demittit ... pateant... arceret. Demittit being an historical present, the verbs dependent upon it might be either in the pres, or imperf. Here we have both; a construction which is occasionally used. See Caes. B. G. I. 8, communit ... conarentur ... possit. Ut pateant expresses Jupiter's charge to Mercury, ne arceret, his object in giving it – 298. Novae; with Karthaginis. See v. 366. 299. Hospitio Teucris = as a place of refuge to the Trojans. Gr. 390. A. & S. 227. Fati; i. e. the destiny that they were to settle in Italy. Dido, called also Elissa, the daughter of Belus, king of Tyre (or, according to another account, of Sidon), and the wife of Sychaeus, whom her brother Pygmalion murdered for his riches. 300. Aëra Gr. 93. 1. A. & S. 80, R. Magnum=expanded. — 301 Remigio=by the rowing movement, oarage. Adstitit. See on fugere, G. I. 330 — 303. Volente deo=since the god (wills it): referring probably to Mercury. Quietum= peaceful. - 304. Accipit. Dido passively and unconsciously receives the influence of the god, and is thereby prepared to treat the Trojans kindly, when they shall arrive. She does not yet know of their presence in her territory, nor even of their existence, and therefore can not entertain feelings or thoughts in respect to them. — 305. Volvens = qui volvebat. 306 Alma See on G. I. 7. – 307, Accesserit ... teneant; depending on quaerere. Gr. 525. A. & S. 265. — 308. Inculta a desert. Gr. 441 and 2. A. & S. 205, R. 7 (2). Videt. Gr. 669. V. A. & S. 309. 2 (1). — 309. Exacta=the results of his search, his discoveries. _ 310. In - nemorum = in a place where the woody shores (of the cove) narrow: more lit. in a narrowing of the groves ; i. e. where the forest-crowned shores approach each other, forming the head of the cove (v. 164). Convexo ; from conveho, I bring together. Cavata=overarching. – 311. Horrentibus. See on v. 165. – 312. Comitatus. Gr. 221. 2. A. & S. 162. 17 (a). - 313. Bina. Gr. 174. 2. 4). A. & S. 120. 4 (a). Crispans probably expresses the motion of the spear merely as carried in the hand in walking. Henry interprets it as grasping, clenching." Ferro. Gr. 428. A. & S. 211, R. 6. — 314. Cui. Gr. 391. A. & S. 222, R. 1 (6). 315. Venus assumes the face and appearance of a virgin and the accoutrements of a huntress. — 316. Qualis – Harpalyce= (of such a virgin) as the Thracian Harpalyce (is, who, or, when she) tires horses ; i. e. by outrunning them. On the elliptical structure of the

sentence, cf. v. 498 and IV, 143. Harpalyce was a daughter of Harpalycus, a Thracian king. After the death of her father, by whom she was trained in all, manly exercises, she spent her time in the forests as a robber, being so swift in running that horses were unable to overtake her. - 317, Fuga; of rapid movement in general. Hebrum; a river of Thra flowing into the Aegean. - 318, Humeris. Gr. 386. A. & S. 224. Habilem=well fitted, well shaped ; i. e, for the hand. - 319. Venatrix, Gr. 362, A. & S, 210, R. 4 Diffundere. Gr. 553. V. A. & $. 274- 7 (6). — 320. Genu ... sinus. Gr. 380 and 1. A. & S. 234. II. and R, 2. Nodo. Gr. 414 and 3. A. & S. 247 and 2. -321 Prior. Gr. 174, note on primus. A.&S. 120, 1. Juvenes. See on Hor. C. I. 2. 41. Monstrate ... vidistis si; if you have seen ... point out to me where she is; not, tell me whether you have seen. — 322. Quam, Gr. 455 and 2 A. & S. 137, R. (3). — 323. Tegmine lyncis. This was worn as a chlamys or scarf. — 324. Apri cursum = aprum currenten , i. e, a boar that has broken covert. Clamore ; sc, canum. - 326. Audita; (sc. est) ; not = heard of, the reference being to clamore. Mihi, Gr.388.4 A, & S. 225. II. – 327. O would have been regularly followed by a voc. of her name ; for he is sure that she is a goddess ( o dea certe), though he knows not what goddess. Quam te. Gr. 373. A. & S 230. Memorem. Gr. 485. A. & S. 260, R. 5. 328. Hominem Gr. 371. 3. A. & S. 232. (2)Certe. Gr. 583. 2. A. & S. 277, R. L. 329. An...

= utrum ... an, but two separate questions. Phoebi; i, e. Apollo. Soror; i. e. Diana. This is conjectured from her attire as a huntress, Sanguinis = generis. — 330. Sis felix. See on E, V. 65. Quaecumque ; i. e, qualiscumque dea (s. 331. Tandem pray, In interrogations the word expresses im. patience. 332. Locorumque. Gr. 663. III. 4), A. & S. 307.3 In scanning connect with the next verse, - 334. Multa , .. hostia See on E, I. 34. 335. Me... bonore Gr.419. 2a A. & S. 244, R. 1. - 336. Virginibus, . . mos. Gr. 390 and 2. A. & S. 227 and R. 4. Gestare. Gr. 549. A. & S. 269. – 337. Alte ; refer. ring to the height of the boot, which rose more than half way to the knee, and the object of which was to protect the feet and legs from brambles. Cf. E. VII. 32. - 338. Punica, The terms Poeni and Punicus point to the Phoenician origin of the Carthaginians. Tyrios; because Dido and her colony were from Tyre. Agenoris urbem Carthage is so called in allusion to the descent of Dido from Agenor, the twin brother of Belus and king of Phoenicia. - 339. Fines Li. byci; i.e. the country, as distinguished from the city, is a part of Libya. Genus ; grammatically in apposition with fines, but in sense referring to the noun Libyes Implied in Libyci. CE IV. 40. Bello. Gr. 414 and 4. A. & S. 247 and 3. - 340. Imperium is here the command,

an, not

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not the domain. 341. It is a long and intricate tale of wrong. 342. Sequar = I will recount in order. - 343. Huic conjux Gr. 390 and 2.

A. & S. 227 and R. 4. Agri. Gr. 399 and 2. 2). A. & S. 213 and R. 1 (3). — 344. Phoenicum Gr. 396. III. A. & S. 212, R 2 Miserae; for ab ea misera. Gr. 388. 3. A. & S. 225. II. Cl. IV. 31. Amore. Gr. 414 and 3. A. & S. 247 and 2. 345. Pa. ter; Belus. See v. 621. Intactam; i. e. not previously married, Hence primis; i. e. the auspices taken when she was married to Sychaeus, were the first ones. 346. Ominibus; the omens of the marriage sacrifice, and hence the marriage rite. A mixture of instr. and temp. abl. — 347. Scelere. Gr. 429. A. & S. 250. 1. Immanior, The comparative is pleonastic. A. & S. 256, R. 13 (6). - 348. Sychaeum. For the variety of the quantity in the first syllable (cf. V, 348) see on v. 258. – 349. Aras; i. e. of the Penates. CL. IV. 21, Atque couples caecus with impius. – 350. Incautum superat. Cf, III. 332. Amorum. Gr. 399. A. & S. 213. — 352. Malus. Gr. 443. A. & S. 205, R. 15. - 353. Inhumati, Cf. VI. 325 - 328. – 354. Modis. Join with pallida. Gr.414 and 3. A. & S. 247 and 2, - 356. Nudavit disclosed. Domus scelus the domestic crime ; i. e. as perpetrated by her brother, not as perpetrated before the Penates. - 357. Celerare ... excedere. Gr. 558, VI, and 3, A. & S. 273. 2. — 358. Auxilium. Gr. 363. A. & S. 204 and R. ! (2). Viae. Gr. 396. II. A. & S. 211, R. 2. Tellure=from the earth. In her dream the ghost seems to her to open the earth and dig out from it the old treasures, 360. His; i. e. by these revelations. 361. Crudele

fierce, Savage,

- 362. Acer keen, violent; i. e. such as impels to action, Cf. III. 682. Both acer and crudele are emphatic. — 365. Locos. Gr. 379. 4. A. & S. 237, R. 5 (c). - 366. Novae. See on v. 298. - 367. Mercati; sc. sunt, Byrsam= (called) Byrsa. This word, whence the legend of the bull's hide (Búpoa in Greek meaning a hide) arose, appears to have been the Greek corruption of Bosra, the Phoenician name of the citadel of Carthage. -368. Taurino ... tergo. The story was that they cut the hide so as to make one thong; the bargain being that they should have as much ground as they could compass with a bull's hide. Possent. Gr. 485. A. & S. 366. 3. — 369. Tandem. See on v. 331. – 370. Talibus; probably with quaerenti, though it may go with ille. — 371. Imo. Gr. 441. 6. A. & S. 205, R. 17. – 372, si-pergam; i. e. if I should tell my story throughout, beginning at the first. Pergam... vacet ... componat. Gr. 502 ; 503 and III. ; 509. A. & S. 261 and 2. -373. Vacet =should you have leisure. — 374. Ante = first; i. e. before I should finish. Diem ... componat=would lay the day to sleep. Vesper; the god of evening, the evening star personified, Clauso... Olympo = clos.

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