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for the origin of all things as I will, I am brought back to this at last. But why were all things created ? and what is our destiny?" Such thoughts, without guide or compass to direct him, soon cast his mind upon an ocean of conjecture and uncertainty as usual; but in his present feelings, his mind, for the first time, turned to the possibility of a communication from the Author of our being as to light and comfort. “If all doubt conld be removed,” he thought, “and a moral certainty be given, that we have received instruction on these points from an infinite source, it would indeed impart repose to the soul.” But no sooner did this idea arise, than the arguments which he was accustomed to employ to prove its absurdity rushed into his mind. They did not, however, bring with them the usual confidence and satisfaction.

THE

DIVINE AUTHORITY

OF THE

CHRISTIAN REVELATION

ACKNOWLEDGED,

BY THE AUTHOR OF

A DIALOGUE ON PROVIDENCE, FAITH AND PRAYER.

PRINTED FOR THE

American Unitarian Association.

BOSTON,
LEONARD C. BOWLES, 50 WASHINGTON STREET.

1829.

Price 4 Cents.

BOSTON, Press of Isaac R. Butts.

THE

DIVINE AUTHORITY

OP THE

CHRISTIAN REVELATION

ACKNOWLEDGED.

On the day appointed for the funeral of Mrs Henderson's friend, the widow Brown, George lingered in the parlor after breakfast, as if something more than usual occupied his mind and detained him. At length he inquired of his mother if she intended going to Dorchester. On being answered in the affirmative, he asked, who would go with her ?

“ Your father, my dear;" replied Mrs Henderson. Why do you ask ?"

" I thought you might wish me to go with you," he replied, “and if so, I should need to make arrangements for it this morning."

“ If you are willing to go with me," said his mother, " and can leave your business, I shall be quite glad; for though your father is desirous of paying this tribute of respect to the memory of our friend, yet it will put him to great inconvenience."

George said he should be pleased to take the place of his father; and his mother frankly expressed a grateful sense of his attention.

The conversation between the mother and her son during their ride to the house of mourning, was of a moral and serious cast, but nothing showed any decided change in George's feelings, till Mrs Henderson made some re mark, such as frequently fell from her, respecting the manifestation of divine benevolence in all the natural and moral world. “I think," she continued, " it gives a new force and beauty to all that we admire, to be able to trace the hand of a merciful God through all creation.”

“I wish," said George, “ you could find any way to give me a perception of this benevolence, in supposing God the author of that strange system that is called the christian revelation."

“Is it possible you can think that God has no concern for the multitude of beings he has created," asked Mrs Henderson,

“No," replied her son ;“on the contrary I believe he has considered their welfare in all his works. I see evident testimonies of his care in the creation around us; every thing is adapted to the wants and enjoyments of his creatures. I believe all we see was made by God for the use and comfort of his intelligent offspring. But I do not suppose that a Being infinite in power and glory as well as in goodness, will concern himself about the petty circumstances of beings whose whole existence, and even the world they inhabit, are but as a point in his view, and as a moment in duration. That we should suppose ourselves important enough to occupy the thought or attention of infinite mind appears to me such an evidence of presumption, that no one who is justly impressed with a sense of God could ever entertain such an idea.''

“ Your sentiments are not unnatural, my dear son," replied his mother, " and result from the narrowness of a young mind. It is long, very long, that we must think

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