The Educational Journal of Virginia, Bind 13–14

Forsideomslag
Charles Henry Winston, Thomas Randolph Price, D. Lee Powell, John Meredith Strother, H. H. Harris, Harry Fishburne Estill (F.), John P. McGuire, Rodes Massie, William Fayette Fox, Richard Ratcliffe Farr, John Lee Buchanan, George R. Pace
Educational Publishing House, 1882
 

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Side 366 - The day is done, and the darkness Falls from the wings of Night, As a feather is wafted downward From an Eagle in his flight. I see the lights of the village Gleam through the rain and the mist, And a feeling of sadness comes o'er me That my soul cannot resist; A feeling of sadness and longing, That is not akin to pain, And resembles sorrow only As the mist resembles the rain.
Side 92 - Industry need not wish, as Poor Richard says and he that lives upon hope will die fasting. There are no gains without pains; then help hands for I have no lands, or if I have, they are smartly taxed.
Side 91 - I stopped my horse lately, where a great number of people were collected at an auction of merchants' goods. The hour of the sale not being come, they were conversing on the badness of the times; and one of the company called to a plain, clean, old man, with white locks, "Pray, Father Abraham, what think you of the times? Will not these heavy taxes quite ruin the country? How shall we ever be able to pay them? What would you advise us to?" Father Abraham stood up, and replied, "If you would have my...
Side 16 - For which of you, intending to build a tower, sitteth not down first and counteth the cost, whether he have sufficient to finish it ? Lest haply after he hath laid the foundation, and is not able to finish...
Side 150 - There is not wind enough to twirl The one red leaf, the last of its clan, That dances as often as dance it can, Hanging so light, and hanging so high, On the topmost twig that looks up at the sky.
Side 77 - There is no office higher than that of a teacher of youth, for there is nothing on earth so precious as the mind, soul, character of the child. No office should be regarded with greater respect. The first minds in the community should be encouraged to assume it. Parents should do all but impoverish themselves, to induce such to become the guardians and guides of their children.
Side 313 - For the North and South alike there is but one remedy. All the constitutional power of the nation and of the States, and all the volunteer forces of the people, should be summoned to meet this danger by the saving influence of universal education.
Side 290 - God, in the nature of each being, founds Its proper bliss, and sets its proper bounds : But as he fram'da whole, the whole to bless, On mutual wants built mutual happiness : So from the first, eternal Order ran, And creature link'd to creature, man to man.
Side 92 - What though you have found no treasure, nor has any rich relation left you a legacy, ' diligence is the mother of good luck, and God gives all things to industry. Then plough deep while sluggards sleep, and you shall have corn to sell and to keep.
Side 92 - He that hath a trade, hath an estate ; and he that hath a calling, hath an office of profit and honor," as poor Richard says ; but then the trade must be worked at, and the calling well followed, or neither the estate nor the office will enable us to pay our taxes. If we are industrious, we shall never starve ; for, " at the working man's house, hunger looks in, but dares not enter.

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