Thoth a romance

Forsideomslag
Blackwood and Sons, 1888 - 207 sider
 

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Indhold

I
7
II
11
III
26
IV
38
V
43
VI
51
VII
60
VIII
68
XII
118
XIII
128
XIV
137
XV
148
XVI
153
XVII
161
XVIII
166
XIX
176

IX
76
X
88
XI
102
XX
191
XXI
197
XXII
207

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Populære passager

Side 36 - Nay, speak not comfortably to me of death, oh great Odysseus. Rather would I live on ground as the hireling of another, with a landless man who had no great livelihood, than bear sway among all the dead that be departed.
Side 16 - But the greatest misery of all was, the dejection of mind, in such as found themselves beginning to be sick, for they grew presently desperate, and gave themselves over without making any resistance, as also their dying thus like sheep, infected by mutual visitation, for the greatest mortality proceeded that way. For if men forbore...
Side 15 - Upon this followed a sneezing and hoarseness, and not long after the pain, together with a mighty cough, came down into the breast. And when once it was settled in the stomach, it caused vomit; and with great torment came up all manner of bilious purgation that physicians ever named.
Side 17 - ... men half dead about every conduit through desire of water. The temples also where they dwelt in tents were all full of the dead that died within them ; for, oppressed with the violence of the calamity, and not knowing what to do, men grew careless, both of holy and profane things alike. And the laws which they formerly used touching funerals were all now broken, every one burying where he could find room.
Side 17 - And many for want of things necessary, after so many deaths before, were forced to become impudent in the funerals of their friends. For when one had made a funeral pile, another getting before him would throw on his dead, and give it fire. And when one was in burning, another would come, and, having cast thereon him whom he carried, go his way again.
Side 69 - It didn't look as though there'd be any place to go, for as far as the eye could reach there was nothing but a sea of waving grass, cypress and tangled mangrove thickets.
Side 18 - ... profitable to pleasure, that was made both profitable and honourable. Neither the fear of the gods, nor laws of men, awed any man. Not the former, because they concluded it was alike to worship or not worship, from seeing that alike they all perished ; nor the latter, because no man expected his life would last, till he received punishment of his crimes by judgment.
Side 15 - If any man were sick before, his disease turned to this; if not, yet suddenly, without any apparent cause preceding and being in perfect health, they were taken first with an extreme ache in their heads, redness and inflammation of the eyes; and then inwardly, their throats and tongues grew presently bloody and their breath noisome and unsavoury.
Side 17 - ... touching funerals, were all now broken; every one burying where he could find room. And many for want of things necessary, after so many deaths before, were forced to become impudent in the funerals of their friends. For when one had made a funeral pile *, another getting before him, would throw on his dead and give it fire. And when one was burning, another would come, and having cast thereon him whom he carried, go his way again. /And the great licentiousness, which also in other kinds was...
Side 28 - Daphne had determined, in like manner, to enter into no forced marriage, but to form a fitting connection with some man whom she loved and honoured, if chance so willed it, in marriage, but if not, even as Aspasia with Pericles.

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